Moments of the year January 5, 2009

Bowlers 4, Batsmen 1

ESPNcricinfo staff
Cricinfo's senior editors on the best passages of cricket they watched in 2008
  shares 29



Hold on to this one, he's a goodie: his team-mates swarm Mendis in the Asia Cup final © AFP

Osman Samiuddin

Mendis in the Asia Cup final
This was the beauty of it, of cricket and cricketers in the subcontinent. A young guy, very much his own guy, little heard of, coming out on a big stage and torpedoing a giant. Even if Ajantha Mendis never bowled another ball or got another wicket, his six-for would stand as tribute, a most beautiful tribute in fact, to the art and joy of this region's cricket. It doesn't matter if it is a fleeting thing - often that enhances it - for in that moment, or prolonged moment, you are sucked in and taken along on a ride where nothing makes sense but everything makes you smile and makes the hair on your body stand up. Cricket becomes an experience, a very visceral experience, and not a sport, to be sensed, even touched, but above all to be felt.

These bouts are difficult to explain. The National Stadium in Karachi had been a graveyard for the bowlers. Three hundred was the new 240. Two seventy-four was thus a gettable thing, and with Virender Sehwag in flow and India 76 for 1 in the 10th over, it threatened to be a miniscule total. Mendis - rested in the group game against India - came on, Sehwag charged a straight, wide one, missed, and was stumped. Yuvraj Singh, Suresh Raina and Rohit Sharma also missed straight balls; they expected something to happen with that strange grip and yet nothing really did. Suddenly India were all out for 173. These things happen in such a sudden burst of flair.

There was about the whole spell, a very Pakistani air - something a Waqar or Wasim could do, but more pertinently something a guy like Mohammad Zahid from Gaggu Mandi, who only his parents had heard of, could do. Stuart Broad took a superb five-fer against South Africa last summer but it was all so pristine, so sanitised: straight-up swing; nice, coached upright action; edges to slip; boy who has worked his way through a structure.

This was nothing like it, because it induced in India a very visible panic and in everyone else the purest thrill, from a guy nobody knew much about. Fielders suddenly become more alert, batsmen more incompetent, balls turning who knows which way, and that is the joy of cricket surely, at its absolute base level: in a team game, one man changing the mood of a match, of entire countries, in a trice, just like that, as you or I might turn on a switch. Indeed, the best was that until the very end, nobody could say for sure that someone like Mahendra Singh Dhoni - an equal of Mendis in unorthodoxy - wouldn't do what Mendis had just done and switch it all back. Ajantha Mendis, long may he live and bowl; the glory of this region's cricket, long may it flourish.

Osman Samiuddin is the Pakistan editor of Cricinfo

Peter English

Session one at the WACA, Australia v South Africa
Opening sessions that justify the pre-series hype are rare and when Australia are involved they usually occur only in Ashes contests. South Africa provided the perfect gatecrash in the first Test at the WACA with a brilliant 30 minutes that involved three wickets and showed Australia were finally in a serious contest at home. Dale Steyn and Makhaya Ntini had been talked about as major weapons and they provided the early bullets. Getting through Matthew Hayden, Ricky Ponting and Michael Hussey can sometimes takes days, but the opening pair managed it in less than six overs.

An out-of-form Hayden was uncertain outside off stump and edged to Ntini, who followed next ball by having a driving Ponting caught superbly by AB de Villiers in the cordon. Hussey avoided the hat-trick but was quickly lined up by Steyn's angle and de Villiers was sharp again. It was the sort of spell that excited neutrals, shocked Australian fans and gave South Africans hope.

It also did something that few teams manage Down Under, by getting the home players to doubt themselves. To achieve all that in half an hour was an incredible feat. While it set up the series, it did not gain South Africa immediate control, with the advantage swinging from side to side throughout the three sessions - and the entire game. The opening day couldn't match the start of the Ashes in 2005, but it was so addictive.

Peter English is the Australasia editor of Cricinfo



Flintoff wonders just what he needs to do after a plumb lbw against Kallis has been turned down © Getty Images

Andrew Miller

Flintoff to Kallis at Edgbaston
A spell so good, it deserved to win a Test match. That it did not was ultimately down to the skill of Graeme Smith, whose incredible 154 not out in the second innings secured an improbable run-chase, but when Andrew Flintoff tore into Jacques Kallis to turn the Edgbaston Test match on its head, it was the moment a great competitor announced his rehabilitation at Test level. Until his intervention, England had been drifting out of contention. Their first-innings 231 had been all but matched and six South African wickets were still standing. Then Flintoff upped the ante. Two brutal bouncers and a pair of perfect yorkers, the second of which struck Kallis plumb in front of middle, revived memories of Flintoff's inspired over to Ricky Ponting on the same ground in 2005, except it took another four deliveries to get the desired result. Another wicked bouncer and a perfect outswinging yorker ripped Kallis from the crease, to scenes of wild adulation.

The over had a twin impact. Firstly, it was indisputable proof of Flintoff's enduring class at international level - at the age of 30, and after four ankle operations, seeing was believing, and for the packed Birmingham crowd that day, belief had rarely felt so good. Secondly, it reminded England that all the line-and-length merchants in the world cannot make up for the raw threat of a genuine 90mph speedster. For the next Test at The Oval, Kevin Pietersen's first in charge, Steve Harmison was recalled to the fold, and the improvement in the team was plain for all to see.

Andrew Miller is the UK editor of Cricinfo

Dileep Premachandran

Yuvraj v England's spinners in Chennai
As VVS Laxman trudges back, some fans clutch their heads in despair. Yuvraj Singh strides to the middle a minute later, but on a final-day pitch taking dramatic turn, he's not the figure you want to see. Sachin Tendulkar has made sedate progress to 32, and it's becoming increasingly obvious that he will have to seize the initiative if the effervescent Graeme Swann and the less bubbly Monty Panesar are to be kept at bay.

Tendulkar starts Panesar's next over with a typically precise paddle sweep. As it streaks past Matt Prior and the helmet for four, the crowd finds its voice again. After a nervous Yuvraj sees off another over from Swann, Tendulkar targets Monty once more. This time, a short ball is dismissed to the rope at square leg. He seems to be warming into his role as Yuvraj's guardian.

But does the younger man need such cotton wool? Having been flummoxed by a Swann delivery that turns right across his bat and into Prior's gloves, Yuvraj decides to trust the attacking instincts that have served him so well in coloured clothes. A lovely back-foot push through the covers gives Swann reason to think, and when the next ball lands on leg stump, it's swept with awesome power for four more.



Ishant Sharma draws first blood in what turned out to be the rivalry of the year © Getty Images

When Monty resumes, Yuvraj is out of his crease and lofting with confidence down to long-on. Pietersen swiftly calls off his spin twins and brings back Steve Harmison and Andrew Flintoff. The tide has turned, the Red Sea parted by a man who allegedly can't play spin.

Dileep Premachandran is an associate editor at Cricinfo

Sambit Bal

Ishant v Ponting in Perth
It isn't coincidence that four out of five in this collection of memories of the best cricket we watched last year - are about triumphs by bowlers. It¹s a reflection of our times. What's rare is precious. When the standard wicket-taking method is boring the batsman out with run-denying lines and smart fields, which often include a deep point, out-and-out wicket-taking performances are the ones to hold on to.

After a bit of juggling I settled on Ishant Sharma's dismantling of Ricky Ponting over Ajantha Mendis' dumbfounding of Rahul Dravid in Colombo - if only because the first was a spectacle that lasted an hour. Already in the same Test we had seen a thrilling duel between the game's two premier players, Sachin Tendulkar and Brett Lee, but this was between a rookie and a master, and the master ended up looking like a rookie.

In the first over he bowled to him on the fourth day, Ishant could have had Ponting twice - one went away missing the outside edge by a fraction, and another jagged back and hit in front - but that he didn't only prolonged the drama. Ishant charged in over and over, hurrying Ponting with pace, getting him to fend with bounce, beating him with movement. Every over probably seemed like an eternity for Ponting, who couldn't even get off strike. The reward finally came in the eighth, which came about as a last-second change of mind prompted by Virender Sehwag, who had seen Ishant bowl long spells as his captain for the Delhi team. The ball pitched on off stump and rose while leaving Ponting, who could only edge it to Rahul Dravid at slip. That was Ishant's only wicket in the innings, but it was the one that mattered.

Sambit Bal is the editor of Cricinfo

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • Nipun on January 7, 2009, 16:33 GMT

    If it's only the Indian moments that matter,then why doesn't cricinfo change its name to Indian Cricket News ??? Losers !

  • Tonyhew on January 7, 2009, 10:10 GMT

    AB De Villiers fielding in Australia, the catches, the back handed stops almost giving him two options - a bit different but amazing

  • prakhar1 on January 7, 2009, 8:41 GMT

    I agree with Everything but surely u can't leave out Mitchell Johnson's 8 for in Perth. Almost everyone agreed it was one of the best bowling spells for a long time.

  • danish_tahir87 on January 6, 2009, 13:46 GMT

    This shows that cricinfo editors are so biased. Look everyone talked about their own country's team. Only Osman breaking the unseen rules. I find this so disgusting. I feel the best moment in the whole year came when JP Duminy played a blinder to help South Africa to lift the recent series against Australia. It just proved that cricket is getting more competitive as the time progresses. While as a Pakistan Cricket Fan, I am sad that team Pakistan did not get much cricket in 2008. Hope the things would get better in 2009. Danish Tahir, Karachi...

  • Inducker on January 6, 2009, 12:33 GMT

    Flintoff vs Kallis. The rave reviews Flintoff gets only serve to indicate what a consistent UNDER performer he has been. Yes he certainly has had his moments but but moments they have been. Why don't you put up Flintoff's stats with Kallis' and then we'll see who the greatest alrounder since Sobers really is! With regard to Kallis, he consistently gets a unjustifiably bad press but the circumstances in which he has had to bat propping up SA batting time and again have dictated the way he plays. The nonsense written about selfishness (as if 10000 test runs, 250 wickets and 100+ catches represent in some misguided way represent selfishness)only reflect the his opponent's frustration. Unfortunately lately Kallis seems to be succumbing to this propaganda and has been getting himself out. Give me his wonderfully correct technique to any amount of 20/20 golf swings anyday!

  • Inducker on January 6, 2009, 12:25 GMT

    With regard to the Flintoff / Kallis encounter, Miller conveniently leaves out some important (if distasteful) facts. The Edgebaston sightscreen did not cover Flintoff's background adequately, the pitch was apparently the most lateral it had ever been in a test match. Kallis could not see certain of Flintoff's deliveries at the point of take-off. The 12th man Petersen was sent to put a white towel over the offending area and prevented from doing so (and sworn at) by ? members reported to be in the vicinity of the 3rd umpire. Why God alone knows, if batsman can't see makeshift arrangements are made. Vaughan refused a formal request between innings. His obvious glee at Kallis' dismissal was disgusting sportsmanship. When Vaughan departed tearfully (Smith's second England captain to go) not a single SA supporter was sympathetic.

  • Inducker on January 6, 2009, 12:17 GMT

    With regard to the Flintoff / Kallis encounter, Miller conveniently leaves out some important (if distasteful) facts. The Edgebaston sightscreen did not cover Flintoff's background adequately, the pitch was apparently the most lateral it had ever been in a test match. Kallis could not see certain of Flintoff's deliveries at the point of take-off. The 12th man Petersen was sent to put a white towel over the offending area and prevented from doing so (and sworn at) by ? members reported to be in the vicinity of the 3rd umpire. Why God alone knows, if batsman can't see makeshift arrangements are made. Vaughan refused a formal request between innings. His obvious glee at Kallis' dismissal was disgusting sportsmanship. When Vaughan departed tearfully (Smith's second England captain to go) not a single SA supporter was sympathetic.

  • Scuba__Steve on January 6, 2009, 9:13 GMT

    Andrew Miller has omitted a key fact in Flintoff's dismissal of Kallis - the dodgy sight screen that a desperate Vaughan refused to change. While it was undoubtedly an excellent spell of bowling and absorbing passage of play, the key fact is that Kallis was struggling to see the ball out of Flintoff's hand. Not exactly a fair contest, and in that respect, not deserving of being on this list.

    What about Steyn's 76 against Australia that allowed SA to post a lead and take the game and the series? Still reckon Ponting dropped that series when he put Steyn down on 30. Tough one.

  • Priyam-Sanjeev on January 6, 2009, 7:24 GMT

    Looks like Paulie didn't watch the match. Ponting was completely clueless about what was happening around with him when Ishant was bowling. Greatness is about consistency. Ishant has been ever improving and surely is among the top bowlers playing the game. Its not about just one wicket, but how David fell Goliath.

  • ReactionRx on January 6, 2009, 2:56 GMT

    Osman Samiuddin was high (on drugs) when he wrote the piece about Mendis just read his out of body visceral experience again. Jokes aside I think Mendis is truly a spinner that cricket needed, just when the art of spin seemed to be losing its charm, with his clean action and magical skills he can inspire an entire generation just like Warne, Kumble, and Murali.

  • Nipun on January 7, 2009, 16:33 GMT

    If it's only the Indian moments that matter,then why doesn't cricinfo change its name to Indian Cricket News ??? Losers !

  • Tonyhew on January 7, 2009, 10:10 GMT

    AB De Villiers fielding in Australia, the catches, the back handed stops almost giving him two options - a bit different but amazing

  • prakhar1 on January 7, 2009, 8:41 GMT

    I agree with Everything but surely u can't leave out Mitchell Johnson's 8 for in Perth. Almost everyone agreed it was one of the best bowling spells for a long time.

  • danish_tahir87 on January 6, 2009, 13:46 GMT

    This shows that cricinfo editors are so biased. Look everyone talked about their own country's team. Only Osman breaking the unseen rules. I find this so disgusting. I feel the best moment in the whole year came when JP Duminy played a blinder to help South Africa to lift the recent series against Australia. It just proved that cricket is getting more competitive as the time progresses. While as a Pakistan Cricket Fan, I am sad that team Pakistan did not get much cricket in 2008. Hope the things would get better in 2009. Danish Tahir, Karachi...

  • Inducker on January 6, 2009, 12:33 GMT

    Flintoff vs Kallis. The rave reviews Flintoff gets only serve to indicate what a consistent UNDER performer he has been. Yes he certainly has had his moments but but moments they have been. Why don't you put up Flintoff's stats with Kallis' and then we'll see who the greatest alrounder since Sobers really is! With regard to Kallis, he consistently gets a unjustifiably bad press but the circumstances in which he has had to bat propping up SA batting time and again have dictated the way he plays. The nonsense written about selfishness (as if 10000 test runs, 250 wickets and 100+ catches represent in some misguided way represent selfishness)only reflect the his opponent's frustration. Unfortunately lately Kallis seems to be succumbing to this propaganda and has been getting himself out. Give me his wonderfully correct technique to any amount of 20/20 golf swings anyday!

  • Inducker on January 6, 2009, 12:25 GMT

    With regard to the Flintoff / Kallis encounter, Miller conveniently leaves out some important (if distasteful) facts. The Edgebaston sightscreen did not cover Flintoff's background adequately, the pitch was apparently the most lateral it had ever been in a test match. Kallis could not see certain of Flintoff's deliveries at the point of take-off. The 12th man Petersen was sent to put a white towel over the offending area and prevented from doing so (and sworn at) by ? members reported to be in the vicinity of the 3rd umpire. Why God alone knows, if batsman can't see makeshift arrangements are made. Vaughan refused a formal request between innings. His obvious glee at Kallis' dismissal was disgusting sportsmanship. When Vaughan departed tearfully (Smith's second England captain to go) not a single SA supporter was sympathetic.

  • Inducker on January 6, 2009, 12:17 GMT

    With regard to the Flintoff / Kallis encounter, Miller conveniently leaves out some important (if distasteful) facts. The Edgebaston sightscreen did not cover Flintoff's background adequately, the pitch was apparently the most lateral it had ever been in a test match. Kallis could not see certain of Flintoff's deliveries at the point of take-off. The 12th man Petersen was sent to put a white towel over the offending area and prevented from doing so (and sworn at) by ? members reported to be in the vicinity of the 3rd umpire. Why God alone knows, if batsman can't see makeshift arrangements are made. Vaughan refused a formal request between innings. His obvious glee at Kallis' dismissal was disgusting sportsmanship. When Vaughan departed tearfully (Smith's second England captain to go) not a single SA supporter was sympathetic.

  • Scuba__Steve on January 6, 2009, 9:13 GMT

    Andrew Miller has omitted a key fact in Flintoff's dismissal of Kallis - the dodgy sight screen that a desperate Vaughan refused to change. While it was undoubtedly an excellent spell of bowling and absorbing passage of play, the key fact is that Kallis was struggling to see the ball out of Flintoff's hand. Not exactly a fair contest, and in that respect, not deserving of being on this list.

    What about Steyn's 76 against Australia that allowed SA to post a lead and take the game and the series? Still reckon Ponting dropped that series when he put Steyn down on 30. Tough one.

  • Priyam-Sanjeev on January 6, 2009, 7:24 GMT

    Looks like Paulie didn't watch the match. Ponting was completely clueless about what was happening around with him when Ishant was bowling. Greatness is about consistency. Ishant has been ever improving and surely is among the top bowlers playing the game. Its not about just one wicket, but how David fell Goliath.

  • ReactionRx on January 6, 2009, 2:56 GMT

    Osman Samiuddin was high (on drugs) when he wrote the piece about Mendis just read his out of body visceral experience again. Jokes aside I think Mendis is truly a spinner that cricket needed, just when the art of spin seemed to be losing its charm, with his clean action and magical skills he can inspire an entire generation just like Warne, Kumble, and Murali.

  • __PK on January 5, 2009, 21:34 GMT

    Sorry, Sambit, but if it takes a bowler a full hour on the pacey WACA wicket to get a single batsmen out, it's not the bowler who's won.

  • uknsaunders on January 5, 2009, 21:02 GMT

    Can't argue with the article or comments, but I did enjoy the Eng v NZ Old Trafford test. Simply because it was a spinners wicket and 2 decent spinners were causing all kinds of problems and giving batsman a proper examination of their techniques with turn and bounce. Panesars little spell to McCullum is worth watching again and again. The funny thing is the game was won by intelligent captaincy by Vaughan - he stuck a heavy roller on and flattened the track long enough to repel Vettori.

    Anyone remember Southee's second test innings - nice cameo!

  • kingofspain on January 5, 2009, 18:00 GMT

    Note that 4 out of these 5 are from tests. Test cricket is real cricket, the rest is instantly forgettable fluff.

  • Flamingo on January 5, 2009, 15:26 GMT

    I would like to object to Osman Saiuddin's reference to Hitler and the Jews in his article as unnecessary and offensive to all cricket-loving readers. As a fan of Mr Saiuddin, I am disappointed that he felt the need to use this comparison to make his point. I think this paragraph should be removed from the website.

  • Alexk400 on January 5, 2009, 14:54 GMT

    There is only one unforgettable moment. Sehwag 83. Yes sehwag's 319 was more entertainment and savgery but his 83 against England is sheer daredevil attitude. If there is a cricket gladiator , it has to be sehwag in my opinion. He always stand alone and supremely confident of his abilities. None come close. Yes we all know flintoff is very good , but for indian bowler to bowl like flintoff against ponting is something. There is nothing in the world that gives joy like sehwag. Even if sehwag is not indian , i would love to watch hos sheer arrogance and go for broke attitude. Afridi sometime good but he is just a lucky slogger than batsman..more like yousuf pathan. SA winning against Aussie is not that great because aussie bowling sucks more nowadays. Only player i think good in SA is Steyn. In swinging condition , he is as deadly as malcolm marshall. I still do not think mendis is good , he is more hyped. I really think to bat against mendis is real simple.Whack him out of the park.

  • tede on January 5, 2009, 14:11 GMT

    Whatever the greatest moments of Cricket in 2008 were the award for the most disgusting and dumbest metaphor on cricinfo 2008 goes to Osman Samiuddin for following sentence: "The National Stadium in Karachi had helped bowlers during the Asia Cup as much as Hitler had the Jews."

  • nz0003 on January 5, 2009, 13:15 GMT

    What about Brendon McCullum's 80 off 28 balls against Bangladesh, or his IPL innings he was the best Player of 2008 in my opinion

  • FatBoysCanBat on January 5, 2009, 12:18 GMT

    What about Brendon McCullum's sublime 158* off 70-odd balls in the opening match of the IPL, that really set the standard for a fantastic tournament, can't wait for IPL 2009! Then there was Ravi Bopara's double century in an English county one-dayer, and also Mitchell Johnson's 8-for on a losing side.

  • Kitton on January 5, 2009, 11:34 GMT

    I think Graeme Smiths Centuary was in a class of its own... a brilliant hand from the skipper

  • Pravski on January 5, 2009, 11:21 GMT

    Everyone remembers Mendis' 6/13 but what about Sanath Jayasuriya's blazing counterattack in that first innings of the Asia Cup Final?

  • Lidder29 on January 5, 2009, 10:44 GMT

    I thought the most dramatic moment of 2008 was Michael Clarke coming on in the dying overs and running through India to win the test at Sydney, as well as Johnson's awesome spell against S. Africa when he took 5 for 2. After a poor year for Australia these moments really stood out for me.

  • Moemz on January 5, 2009, 10:02 GMT

    Do comments relating to India only going to feature in this comment section?How about this for a moment of the year? India skittled out for under 100 within twenty overs in the first session of a test match on home soil... guess the memory only recall's when india are at their best. In all fairness they have played some excellent cricket - definetly the second best side in the world. South Africa on the other hand have gone away to India, Englan and Australia with fair measure of success - definitely the number ONE at the moment.

  • sacricketlegend on January 5, 2009, 8:15 GMT

    Sehwag's better-than-a-run-a-ball 319 is unforgetteable - I can't see how you can put Yuvraj against the English spinners ahead of that incredible innings where he blasted a world-class attack for plenty. And instead of the opening session at the WACA, I would choose something that deflated the Aussies much more - JP Duminy's 166 at the MCG. Here was a man that had toured with the South African team for more than 18 months, playing in only his 2nd Test (and only because Ashwell Prince had cracked his finger) against the mighty Australians, and after his heroic maiden fifty on debut, he played one of the most elegant innings I have ever seen and turned the Test on its head. Even the Aussie commentators sat up and took notice, comparing him to greats like Lara and the magnificent Sobers. Now THAT is one of the moments of the year.

  • sandysdevils on January 5, 2009, 8:09 GMT

    its unbeleivable that there is no mention of sehwag any of the 4 outstanding knocks he played last year. his 150 odd in adelaide helped india to a draw where the team total was just 267.he scored a 300 in chennai in sapping heat and humidity without any runners or dehydration and was nonstop where most of the players were strugging in chennai summer. what about his 201 not out out of 329 against an attack havin muralitharan and mendis at their best who also enabled to their only victory in that test series single handedly. and his magnificient 83 in dire circumstances chasing 387 on the fourth day of an absolute turning pitch which enabled india to go for a victory rather than a draw

  • Vkarthik on January 5, 2009, 6:45 GMT

    Fastest 300 of Sehwag, Sehwag carrying bat through worth a mention. Both of them are outrageous knocks in different ways. Ordinary human beings cannot play such daring innings.

  • George11 on January 5, 2009, 5:36 GMT

    I will pick Virender Sehvag's 65 ball-83 which eventually enabled India to chase down 387 against Engaland at Cehnnai. It was a true gem of an innings. It's not the amount of runs, but the way he made it - unsettled English fielders & bowlers on the 4th evening and made things easy on the 5th day for India.

  • fooqiman on January 5, 2009, 5:26 GMT

    The atmosphere at Eden Gardens was electric from the very start. The Knight Riders were celebrating already.

    In he came, the newest Knight Rider marching in with his trademark braod shoulders and long hair. The crowd's 'Oooooo' getting louder as he came nearer to the crease. With one quick release he shot one right outside the off stump. Gambhir tapped it towards point and ran a safe single. Sehwag's turn to face the heat. Shoaib back to his mark thinking of his next tactic. Sehwag watched his every move carefully whilst analyzing what he kind of fireball he'll get. Shoaib fired it in fiercely but it went down the leg side for a wide. 'Ok' thought Sehwag 'this guy means business.'

    Next delivery, Shoib knew exactly what to do. He pitched the perfect out swinger right in the sweet spot of the pitch. Shewag nicked it, Saha pouched it. In the blink of an eye, the crowd went insanely beserk, Shoaib was ecstatic, his teammates jumping for joy and running in to hug him.

    A magic moment.

  • Theena on January 5, 2009, 5:05 GMT

    I have nothing of note to add except that I am beginning to absolutely adore Mr Samiuddin's writing.

  • Hansarya on January 5, 2009, 4:51 GMT

    My favorite is Zaheer Khan's reverse swing bowling display against Australia in Mohali where he took three wickets in a few overs after tea.

  • No featured comments at the moment.

  • Hansarya on January 5, 2009, 4:51 GMT

    My favorite is Zaheer Khan's reverse swing bowling display against Australia in Mohali where he took three wickets in a few overs after tea.

  • Theena on January 5, 2009, 5:05 GMT

    I have nothing of note to add except that I am beginning to absolutely adore Mr Samiuddin's writing.

  • fooqiman on January 5, 2009, 5:26 GMT

    The atmosphere at Eden Gardens was electric from the very start. The Knight Riders were celebrating already.

    In he came, the newest Knight Rider marching in with his trademark braod shoulders and long hair. The crowd's 'Oooooo' getting louder as he came nearer to the crease. With one quick release he shot one right outside the off stump. Gambhir tapped it towards point and ran a safe single. Sehwag's turn to face the heat. Shoaib back to his mark thinking of his next tactic. Sehwag watched his every move carefully whilst analyzing what he kind of fireball he'll get. Shoaib fired it in fiercely but it went down the leg side for a wide. 'Ok' thought Sehwag 'this guy means business.'

    Next delivery, Shoib knew exactly what to do. He pitched the perfect out swinger right in the sweet spot of the pitch. Shewag nicked it, Saha pouched it. In the blink of an eye, the crowd went insanely beserk, Shoaib was ecstatic, his teammates jumping for joy and running in to hug him.

    A magic moment.

  • George11 on January 5, 2009, 5:36 GMT

    I will pick Virender Sehvag's 65 ball-83 which eventually enabled India to chase down 387 against Engaland at Cehnnai. It was a true gem of an innings. It's not the amount of runs, but the way he made it - unsettled English fielders & bowlers on the 4th evening and made things easy on the 5th day for India.

  • Vkarthik on January 5, 2009, 6:45 GMT

    Fastest 300 of Sehwag, Sehwag carrying bat through worth a mention. Both of them are outrageous knocks in different ways. Ordinary human beings cannot play such daring innings.

  • sandysdevils on January 5, 2009, 8:09 GMT

    its unbeleivable that there is no mention of sehwag any of the 4 outstanding knocks he played last year. his 150 odd in adelaide helped india to a draw where the team total was just 267.he scored a 300 in chennai in sapping heat and humidity without any runners or dehydration and was nonstop where most of the players were strugging in chennai summer. what about his 201 not out out of 329 against an attack havin muralitharan and mendis at their best who also enabled to their only victory in that test series single handedly. and his magnificient 83 in dire circumstances chasing 387 on the fourth day of an absolute turning pitch which enabled india to go for a victory rather than a draw

  • sacricketlegend on January 5, 2009, 8:15 GMT

    Sehwag's better-than-a-run-a-ball 319 is unforgetteable - I can't see how you can put Yuvraj against the English spinners ahead of that incredible innings where he blasted a world-class attack for plenty. And instead of the opening session at the WACA, I would choose something that deflated the Aussies much more - JP Duminy's 166 at the MCG. Here was a man that had toured with the South African team for more than 18 months, playing in only his 2nd Test (and only because Ashwell Prince had cracked his finger) against the mighty Australians, and after his heroic maiden fifty on debut, he played one of the most elegant innings I have ever seen and turned the Test on its head. Even the Aussie commentators sat up and took notice, comparing him to greats like Lara and the magnificent Sobers. Now THAT is one of the moments of the year.

  • Moemz on January 5, 2009, 10:02 GMT

    Do comments relating to India only going to feature in this comment section?How about this for a moment of the year? India skittled out for under 100 within twenty overs in the first session of a test match on home soil... guess the memory only recall's when india are at their best. In all fairness they have played some excellent cricket - definetly the second best side in the world. South Africa on the other hand have gone away to India, Englan and Australia with fair measure of success - definitely the number ONE at the moment.

  • Lidder29 on January 5, 2009, 10:44 GMT

    I thought the most dramatic moment of 2008 was Michael Clarke coming on in the dying overs and running through India to win the test at Sydney, as well as Johnson's awesome spell against S. Africa when he took 5 for 2. After a poor year for Australia these moments really stood out for me.

  • Pravski on January 5, 2009, 11:21 GMT

    Everyone remembers Mendis' 6/13 but what about Sanath Jayasuriya's blazing counterattack in that first innings of the Asia Cup Final?