Will one-day cricket continue to hold its own between the other two formats?

The prognosis for one-day cricket has been gloomy for long, despite a successful 2011 World Cup and the recent Champions Trophy. Tell us what you think of the format
December 29, 2013

Poll

What do you like about one-day cricket?
See results »

Every time two boards schedule a one-day series between their teams outside of a full tour, critics complain about a lack of context.

Poll

Are bilateral ODI series worthwhile?
See results »

There are many who feel that the introduction of two new balls in ODIs has killed the spinner's role. But others believe there's finally a rule that doesn't favour batsmen.

Poll

What do you think of the use of two new balls in ODIs?
See results »

At its annual conference this year the ICC decided to replace the Champions Trophy with the World Test Championship. But now broadcasters and sponsors are doubtful about the marketability of the Championship.

Poll

Should the Champions Trophy be brought back?
See results »

Day-night cricket, pinch-hitters, Powerplays, sharp fielding - one-day cricket has contributed a lot to the game.

Poll

What does one-day cricket need to make it more exciting?
See results »
Posted by imtiazjaleel on (December 30, 2013, 13:24 GMT)

I don't agree rules are affecting the game. The rule is for both the teams, so i don't understand who is having advantage and who is not. i believe ODI is still a very good format, if you have watched the last two ODI's between SL vs PAK and WI vs NZ, you would know why.

Posted by headphonedelephants on (December 30, 2013, 10:35 GMT)

When is a poll titled "How rubbish is the ICC?" going to come out?

Posted by   on (December 30, 2013, 5:36 GMT)

About the use of 2 new balls.Give the Captain the option,if its a spinning track and he has good spinners,let him decide if he wants to retain the old ball or go for a new one.

Posted by Jasonz on (December 30, 2013, 4:11 GMT)

Regarding the rule adjustments: In principle I don't disagree with the experimentation of several, whilst others I believe never should have made it to the international arena (i.e. the super-sub and the more recent new ball from each end). The power plays (both batting and bowling) have been a semi-worthwhile endeavour but have ultimately proven unnecessary. Rule changes can't and shouldn't attempt to force play-styles that may or may not be match-situation appropriate. The initial 1-10 over power-plays often go un-utilized and those later on are often irrelevant.

Instead, put the power into the players hands. Remove the fielding restrictions. Revert to a single ball per innings. There is no need to bow down the the inflated sense of entitlement born of the social media generation. Let the match situation evolve in an organic manner. Let us watch the players and captains change tactics and adapt skills in a non-linear manner. Let us watch a true contest of skill and mind.

Posted by AidanFX on (December 30, 2013, 2:06 GMT)

I still think One day 50 Over Cricket has a place. It has components which are in keeping with classical cricket - Bowlers have more of a role (10 overs vs 4). Batsmen can construct innings progressively/ partnerships. There are more ebbs and flows than the shorter 20/20.

I realise 20/20 has its own unique worthwhile characteristics and draws people into the game. But 50 Over has many fond memories for me - the Semi Final Aus vs SA back in the World Cup, one example.

I think the thing is ICC/ and cricket boards need to schedule things wiser. For example, have about five 50 Over matches prior to the Ashes series rather than after it. So much hype goes into an Ashes campaign so by the end of it - will people care about 50 Over matches? The other one is all these pointless seven matches series in India. There just needs to be smarter fixturing. Although Test match cricket is ultimate - the World Cup matches it in prestige.

Posted by   on (December 30, 2013, 1:03 GMT)

A typical tour between two teams should be 3 tests, 3 ODIs, 2 T20s. Bigger series like the Ashes, ENGvSAF or AUSvIND should have more tests. Get rid of series where they just play one dayers (except as part of a triangular series).

Posted by   on (December 29, 2013, 21:47 GMT)

ODI rules should be revised with respect to bowlers as well, they are equally important as batsmen. New rules like free hit, filed restrictions of mandatory and 2 power plays, 5 fielders within the circle and the flat tracks are realling taking toll of good bowlers too. teams are chasing 300-350 runs easily.

Posted by   on (December 29, 2013, 18:45 GMT)

I would like to see a test league runs throughout 4 years all 10 teams play each other in a home & an away series.series content of 2_5 matches.end of league each team will get 18 test seriess. league topper will be test champ.outside this league no test cricket happens,each test counts to this.no need of a test championship. by this each team will be force to play some test cricket,then automatically no of odis will ne decreased.champions trophy also can make it happen.

Posted by   on (December 29, 2013, 18:02 GMT)

I liked the rule of super-sub . It was quite interesting and required some planning from the captains. So that was one thing which can be a reconsidered. And, only three fielders outside the circle only murders spinners chances of being successful.

ODI cricket still has a lot of followers. Boards or ICC should refrain from organizing bilateral series as tri-series are much more engrossing and competitive.

Posted by   on (December 29, 2013, 17:50 GMT)

I am a big fan of the 50 over cricket. Though I have to admit that ODI cricket was far more enjoyable in the late 90s and the early 2000s. The ICC needs to stop twinkling with the rules of this format. Since the last decade they have tried to bring different ideas like THE SUPER SUBSTITUTE rule in 2006, 3 POWERPLAYS, Batting Powerplays, free hits, 4 fielders outside the inner circle and more recently 2 new balls. I really feel that it is time to go back to the earlier times.

Comments have now been closed for this article

Images of the year

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

More in 2013 review

How closely did you follow cricket in 2013? Take Steven Lynch's quiz

STEVEN ASKS