South Africa v Australia, 1st Test, Centurion, 1st day February 12, 2014

Highest by a No. 4 against South Africa since Harvey

Stats highlights from the first day in Centurion, which was dominated by Shaun Marsh and his 199-run partnership with Steven Smith
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  • Shaun Marsh's unbeaten 122 is his second Test century in 12 innings, after his 141 on debut against Sri Lanka. In ten innings in between, he scored 160 runs at an average of 16.

  • Marsh's century is the first by an Australian No. 4 batsman against South Africa since Damien Martyn's 101 in Johannesburg in 2006. In 21 innings between those two centuries, Australia's No. 4 batsmen averaged 16.20 against South Africa. Among the batsmen who failed in this slot during this period were Michael Hussey (217 runs in 12 innings), and Ricky Ponting (98 runs in seven innings).

  • His unbeaten 122 is also the highest by an Australian No. 4 batsman against South Africa since Neil Harvey's 190 in Sydney in 1953.

  • At 98 for 4 Australia were on the back foot, but Marsh and Steven Smith completely turned the game around with their unbroken 199-run partnership for the fifth wicket, Australia's fifth-best for the fifth wicket in Tests against South Africa. The four higher partnerships, though, all came when Australia already had more than 170 on the board by the time the fifth-wicket pair came together.

  • Not only did South Africa fail to take a wicket after the 34th over, they also seldom looked threatening. During the partnership between Marsh and Smith, the two batsmen had a control factor of 94%, which means only 6% of the deliveries they faced beat the bat, or were edged or mistimed. Smith was especially secure, achieving a control factor of 97%, while for Marsh it was 91% during the partnership and over his entire innings.

  • None of the South Africa bowlers had the Australia batsmen in too much trouble. Against Dale Steyn, the in-control percentage for the batsmen was 86%, against Morne Morkel and Vernon Philander it was 92%, while against Ryan McLaren it was 85%.

  • Steyn, though, did get a couple of wickets, including that of Michael Clarke for the eighth time in the 12 Tests they have played against each other. In those 12 Tests, Clarke has scored 254 runs for an average of 31.75 against Steyn. Only James Anderson and Stuart Broad have dismissed Clarke more often in Tests - both have nailed him nine times each. Clarke has done pretty well against the two other frontline South Africa fast bowlers, averaging 48 against Philander (96 runs, two dismissals), and 94.67 against Morkel (284 runs, three dismissals).

  • If Smith gets a century as well, it will be only the second instance of Australia's No. 4 and No. 6 batsmen getting centuries in the same Test innings against South Africa. The only other instance was in Johannesburg in 1949. Australia won that Test by an innings and 85 runs.

S Rajesh is stats editor of ESPNcricinfo. Follow him on Twitter

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • POSTED BY MasterClass on | February 13, 2014, 8:55 GMT

    I've always rated Shaun Marsh highly and wondered why he was not persisted with rather than try some of the geriatric bunch. But Steve Smith has been an ongoing revelation. He keeps his game so simple and that's what's so amazing in someone so young!

  • POSTED BY on | February 13, 2014, 6:18 GMT

    @ _PK: You are assuming there will be any play on day 5: Had you said 'last innings' I would have no problems, but most tests these days are over in 4 days unless they are (pre-) destined for a draw...

  • POSTED BY BlockaBeahan on | February 13, 2014, 5:43 GMT

    these stats are getting pretty ridiculous

  • POSTED BY on | February 13, 2014, 5:31 GMT

    interesting control metric . nice way to see how good batsmen and bowlers were playing.thanks.

  • POSTED BY nickfromnjp on | February 13, 2014, 4:26 GMT

    bijja and Joseph, Michael Clarke sent Shaun Marsh in at 4 and sent himself down to 5, which meant Smith was 6. Unfortunately for Australia, it didn't really work...

  • POSTED BY bijja on | February 13, 2014, 3:21 GMT

    Joseph, yes, Smith is batting at No 6. In the last stat he has mentioned about No 4 (Marsh) and No 6 (Smith). Have I missed something?

  • POSTED BY David_Bofinger on | February 13, 2014, 2:47 GMT

    The control factor metric is cool but it would be even better if we knew what was average.

  • POSTED BY on | February 13, 2014, 2:43 GMT

    Nice spot ... what ? Rajesh said Clarke was at 4 and Smith at 6 !

  • POSTED BY dunger.bob on | February 13, 2014, 1:53 GMT

    I'm not a big stats man either but I agree this is good. I thought it was a very good partnership and this shows us just how good. It's not over yet either. One or both could go early tomorrow but if they don't there could be a lot more stats on the way.

    @ CamC: "I like the "control factor" metric used here. This is the first time I've seen it used." .. yeah, ditto from me. It gives a bit of a clue re batting comfort.

    @Joseph McGahan: You might want to check the article again Joseph.

  • POSTED BY HenryPorter on | February 12, 2014, 23:13 GMT

    SE Marsh away Tests: 406 runs @ 81; home Tests 17 runs @ 2.8 !

  • POSTED BY MasterClass on | February 13, 2014, 8:55 GMT

    I've always rated Shaun Marsh highly and wondered why he was not persisted with rather than try some of the geriatric bunch. But Steve Smith has been an ongoing revelation. He keeps his game so simple and that's what's so amazing in someone so young!

  • POSTED BY on | February 13, 2014, 6:18 GMT

    @ _PK: You are assuming there will be any play on day 5: Had you said 'last innings' I would have no problems, but most tests these days are over in 4 days unless they are (pre-) destined for a draw...

  • POSTED BY BlockaBeahan on | February 13, 2014, 5:43 GMT

    these stats are getting pretty ridiculous

  • POSTED BY on | February 13, 2014, 5:31 GMT

    interesting control metric . nice way to see how good batsmen and bowlers were playing.thanks.

  • POSTED BY nickfromnjp on | February 13, 2014, 4:26 GMT

    bijja and Joseph, Michael Clarke sent Shaun Marsh in at 4 and sent himself down to 5, which meant Smith was 6. Unfortunately for Australia, it didn't really work...

  • POSTED BY bijja on | February 13, 2014, 3:21 GMT

    Joseph, yes, Smith is batting at No 6. In the last stat he has mentioned about No 4 (Marsh) and No 6 (Smith). Have I missed something?

  • POSTED BY David_Bofinger on | February 13, 2014, 2:47 GMT

    The control factor metric is cool but it would be even better if we knew what was average.

  • POSTED BY on | February 13, 2014, 2:43 GMT

    Nice spot ... what ? Rajesh said Clarke was at 4 and Smith at 6 !

  • POSTED BY dunger.bob on | February 13, 2014, 1:53 GMT

    I'm not a big stats man either but I agree this is good. I thought it was a very good partnership and this shows us just how good. It's not over yet either. One or both could go early tomorrow but if they don't there could be a lot more stats on the way.

    @ CamC: "I like the "control factor" metric used here. This is the first time I've seen it used." .. yeah, ditto from me. It gives a bit of a clue re batting comfort.

    @Joseph McGahan: You might want to check the article again Joseph.

  • POSTED BY HenryPorter on | February 12, 2014, 23:13 GMT

    SE Marsh away Tests: 406 runs @ 81; home Tests 17 runs @ 2.8 !

  • POSTED BY Beertjie on | February 12, 2014, 23:07 GMT

    I happily eat my words on Marsh. Welcome back

  • POSTED BY on | February 12, 2014, 22:53 GMT

    It is only the first day, is it not?

  • POSTED BY JustAnotherCricketFan on | February 12, 2014, 22:18 GMT

    we want more of this 'control factor' thing. its the first time i heard of it but sounds like a pretty good indicator of form, etc. 97% would show Steve smith in good form. although over 80% could indicate that overall bowling wasnt as potent. then again its the first time ive heard of it so dont know waht it means. like 91% if you bowling consistent outswingers with 3 slips and gully would mean pretty much 1 out of every ten bowls you have a chance of taking a catch to slip if the batsmen is unlucky right? but that means for every 100 balls you would only get a genuine chance to get a batsmen out for 9 balls, thats pretty daunting if youre a bowler i suppose? We want more analysis with control factor please!!!

  • POSTED BY __PK on | February 12, 2014, 21:26 GMT

    Nice control metric! Slightly subjective data gathering, but cold, hard stats once gathered. Re the play, I thought 3 down at lunch was pretty even, maybe even advantage Aus because that was a big gamble from SA, using their biggest weapon at the best possible time against Aus' big weakness. They needed to have 5 down at least at lunch. Now Aus gets the best of the batting and can bowl Lyon on Day 5. And we still haven't heard from Mitch or Haddin!

  • POSTED BY VillageGreen on | February 12, 2014, 20:36 GMT

    The top order will really feel they missed out in the first innings, but what's new?

    But it seems we're in for a fascinating series! SA will strike back…can Australia go the distance?

  • POSTED BY ModernUmpiresPlz on | February 12, 2014, 19:39 GMT

    Nice spot Joseph.

    I think those percentages are a bit flattering for SA really, even though they had Australia at 4/90 none of the dismissals had anything to do with the obvious seam movement available. I remember Marsh fencing at a couple as though he were doing his best to nick them and they still moved too far for him to get an edge. Can't help but feel that even at their fullest South Africa were still bowling too short. The pitch maps showed the fullest consistent length was right on the border of a good and full length, and early in the morning I think they should have been another metre up there, it was seaming that much.

    Half an hour into the first session I was seriously worried Aus were going to be somewhere between 6 down and all out by lunch. 297/4 seems like a dream.

  • POSTED BY GrindAR on | February 12, 2014, 19:30 GMT

    Control Factor : Good indicator to measure ball vs bat dominance

  • POSTED BY on | February 12, 2014, 18:07 GMT

    Not mad on stats but these give some content to today's play, well done.

  • POSTED BY on | February 12, 2014, 17:39 GMT

    Good stats other than the last one, Smith is batting at 6

  • POSTED BY CamC on | February 12, 2014, 17:37 GMT

    I like the "control factor" metric used here. This is the first time I've seen it used.

  • POSTED BY Dannymania on | February 12, 2014, 17:17 GMT

    Brilliant..absolutely marvelous statistical Type-up.Kudos and good work.Just HAD to appreciate it as i liked it a LOT!

  • No featured comments at the moment.

  • POSTED BY Dannymania on | February 12, 2014, 17:17 GMT

    Brilliant..absolutely marvelous statistical Type-up.Kudos and good work.Just HAD to appreciate it as i liked it a LOT!

  • POSTED BY CamC on | February 12, 2014, 17:37 GMT

    I like the "control factor" metric used here. This is the first time I've seen it used.

  • POSTED BY on | February 12, 2014, 17:39 GMT

    Good stats other than the last one, Smith is batting at 6

  • POSTED BY on | February 12, 2014, 18:07 GMT

    Not mad on stats but these give some content to today's play, well done.

  • POSTED BY GrindAR on | February 12, 2014, 19:30 GMT

    Control Factor : Good indicator to measure ball vs bat dominance

  • POSTED BY ModernUmpiresPlz on | February 12, 2014, 19:39 GMT

    Nice spot Joseph.

    I think those percentages are a bit flattering for SA really, even though they had Australia at 4/90 none of the dismissals had anything to do with the obvious seam movement available. I remember Marsh fencing at a couple as though he were doing his best to nick them and they still moved too far for him to get an edge. Can't help but feel that even at their fullest South Africa were still bowling too short. The pitch maps showed the fullest consistent length was right on the border of a good and full length, and early in the morning I think they should have been another metre up there, it was seaming that much.

    Half an hour into the first session I was seriously worried Aus were going to be somewhere between 6 down and all out by lunch. 297/4 seems like a dream.

  • POSTED BY VillageGreen on | February 12, 2014, 20:36 GMT

    The top order will really feel they missed out in the first innings, but what's new?

    But it seems we're in for a fascinating series! SA will strike back…can Australia go the distance?

  • POSTED BY __PK on | February 12, 2014, 21:26 GMT

    Nice control metric! Slightly subjective data gathering, but cold, hard stats once gathered. Re the play, I thought 3 down at lunch was pretty even, maybe even advantage Aus because that was a big gamble from SA, using their biggest weapon at the best possible time against Aus' big weakness. They needed to have 5 down at least at lunch. Now Aus gets the best of the batting and can bowl Lyon on Day 5. And we still haven't heard from Mitch or Haddin!

  • POSTED BY JustAnotherCricketFan on | February 12, 2014, 22:18 GMT

    we want more of this 'control factor' thing. its the first time i heard of it but sounds like a pretty good indicator of form, etc. 97% would show Steve smith in good form. although over 80% could indicate that overall bowling wasnt as potent. then again its the first time ive heard of it so dont know waht it means. like 91% if you bowling consistent outswingers with 3 slips and gully would mean pretty much 1 out of every ten bowls you have a chance of taking a catch to slip if the batsmen is unlucky right? but that means for every 100 balls you would only get a genuine chance to get a batsmen out for 9 balls, thats pretty daunting if youre a bowler i suppose? We want more analysis with control factor please!!!

  • POSTED BY on | February 12, 2014, 22:53 GMT

    It is only the first day, is it not?