South Africa v India, 2nd Test, Durban, 4th day December 29, 2013

Emotions high during Kallis' last stand

Jacques Kallis signed off with a century, and his team-mates lived through the last 20 runs before lining up to congratulate the allrounder on a career well played
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Match Point - Kallis a better No. 4 than Tendulkar?

When Jacques Kallis went to bed on Saturday night, he was 78 not out after the third day of his final Test. None of his team-mates really knew what was going through his mind.

"He is a great poker player, so he's got a great poker face. You don't know what he is feeling," Robin Peterson said. "But I'm sure he was more nervous in the nineties than he was last night. It looks like he is just enjoying himself in his last game."

Kallis later revealed how he had felt. "It is a special feeling. It's strange walking out to bat knowing that there is no tomorrow and it will be your last opportunity to get a hundred for your country," he said. "It's a different kind of pressure, being in the nineties for the last time, so it was different to normally being in the nineties."

He spent 49 deliveries moving from 78 to 100, and 20 of them were in the nineties. Petersen said the dressing room lived every one of them. "With 20 runs to go, all the boys were playing the innings with him," he said.

They sat in their box, all looking out of the window, ensuring they didn't miss a thing. Morne Morkel was in the front row with Graeme Smith. Kallis drove to enter the nineties and their expressions grew more anxious with every ball. He left one alone and then clipped through square leg to add one more and stay on strike.

Then Kallis blocked two deliveries from Ravindra Jadeja and worked one to fine leg, and then to square to move to 94. He was beaten by Mohammad Shami, had a short ball hurled at him, survived a yorker and saw one go down the leg side. No run in that over. Nails were bitten.

But 98 came quickly after that, when Jadeja went down the leg side and Kallis played delicately to fine leg. The scoreboard declared him the third highest run-scorer in Test cricket. It was wrong. Three forward-defensives followed, then a single off Shami to move to 99, and three more blocks.

Finally, a nudge to mid-on and a stroll. A 100. Kallis whirled his bat in the air, removed his helmet, looked to the skies and saluted the dressing room. They were on their feet, saluting him back. The Indian fielders were applauding. Kallis owned that moment.

The mood lightened as soon as the milestone was achieved and the focus shifted to South Africa building their lead. By the time he had actually gone past Rahul Dravid to slot into third on the all-time list, the scoreboard had forgotten all about it.

In the next over, Kallis had had enough. He tried to sweep Jadeja but top-edged to offer Dhoni a catch. As soon as he did, the South African players rushed down the steps to greet him. Smith was the first person Kallis met and the captain planted a kiss on his right temple.

"A lot of guys were emotional [as] they went to meet him on the steps," Peterson said. "I was padding up so I couldn't join them. I'm pretty bummed about that. But it was really emotional, especially for the guys who have played with him for a long time. He has raised the bar as far as allrounders are concerned. It was great to see."

Kallis enjoyed the rest of the afternoon with his feet up watching Peterson and du Plessis bat. Smith was next to him the entire time. He had time to think about the innings he had just completed, which started slowly and cautiously, and gave it his stamp of approval.

"In the situation that we were in, it was important to consolidate a bit and make sure we got back on track after losing a few wickets," Kallis said. "We basically tried to pace the innings and keep the scoreboard ticking. It was quite difficult to score because the wicket is quite slow. They put up defensive fields and bowled quite defensively. As we got closer to their total we could afford to be more positive. I thought the guys really paced the innings well."

After South Africa were bowled out for 500, with a lead of 166, Kallis was second last out of the change room. He warmed up and took his place at second slip where nothing came his way. It's likely to be in that position that he will stand on the final day.

"I think he had a bit of a niggle towards the end of his batting," Peterson said, referring to the treatment Kallis received during the drinks break. "We are probably going to have to carry him through his last Test. He has done enough in his career, so hopefully we can do the work and he can just stand at slip."

There are no more milestones for Kallis to chase. He has already claimed his 200th catch and at 292 wickets, 300 is unlikely to be in his sights. All he needs to do is enjoy the final day while the rest are sweating over how to send him off with a win. "He richly deserves to do that," Peterson said. "All the guys just want him to enjoy his last moments."

Firdose Moonda is ESPNcricinfo's South Africa correspondent

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • Akhter786 on December 30, 2013, 4:15 GMT

    It is really a fairytale ending for King Kallis. He has always avoided the limelight, even in his final test. It is really not prudent to compare cricketers, and it is enough for Kallis that he is one of the best cricketer ever played the game. He is , as Dravid said, the most complete cricketer of his era. I am really fortunate to have watched these legends, Lara, Ponting, Sachin, Dravid, Akram, Mcgrath, Warne, Murli, Inzi and King Kallis in action. This is his moment he had scripted it a long way 18 years back.

  • markofcaloundra on December 29, 2013, 21:46 GMT

    I am old enough to have seen Sobers play and of course Kallis. Even early on I always had the feeling Kallis was going to be the challenger for the mantle previously held by Keith Miller and Sobers as the world's best all-lrounder. Now there are still only three..a trinity of truly the greatest allrounders. So very well done Mr Kallis, your name is there for eternity.

  • on December 30, 2013, 17:51 GMT

    I and many experts rate kallis "one of the greatest" cricketer of all time, i know that sachin, lara, ponting are more flamboynt than kallis, but as a cricketer he is more useful to his team. he has 292 wickets also. and a record 21 man of the match awards in test matches. a true legend, we will miss you kaliis, my all time top 5 ranking is: 1) Bradman the greatest, 2) Kallis and Sobers, 3) Tendulkar and Murli, 4) Lara and Warne, 5)Viv Richard, Imran, Wasim, Ponting ,MacGrath

  • on December 30, 2013, 16:23 GMT

    Well done Kallis.Thanks for the great entertainment provided over many years.All the best.

  • Dougie25 on December 30, 2013, 14:06 GMT

    All these comparisons to Sachin... Pffft. Its pretty annoying. Every cricket conversation I have with my Indian friends ends up involving Sachin. You try argue the merits of one player over another, and the response is almost always "Yeah, but Sachin..."

    Sachin was a great batsmen. He was good with the bat. The end.

    Jacques Kallis was a great CRICKETER. He was good with the bat, the ball, and as a fielder. A complete cricketer in the modern era. Worth his weight in gold.

    If I had to pick between Sachin and King Kallis? I'd take the King, purely because he is more versatile and a better all round player and could contribute one way or another.

  • sephotrig on December 30, 2013, 13:44 GMT

    To me Kallis is the greatest cricketer to play the game, for someone to score as many runs as he did, at that average, but to also take more than 200 test catches shows a phenomenal player, but for that player to also take close to 300 test wickets is an unbelievable achievement worthy of reverement. His final innings shows what a true champion he is, being out of form, to go in with his team in a position where they could have collapsed and to put together a chanceless ton. The game will be poorer for the loss of him.

  • on December 30, 2013, 12:49 GMT

    kallis is a great cricketer but certainly not the greatest.there are different facets to greatness and hence comparison with tendulkar is meaningless.... 1.never heard kallis winning many odis with his batting.if a score of 300 is on board he is practically useless.not many players survive with strike rate of 72.many SAfrican fans have questions his place in odi setup. 2.he does not counterattack due to his low range of shots.never heard him of seizing the initiative,or enforcing a strong position like the ponting ,tendulkar and lara did. 3.struggled in aus ,eng,. 4.unable to help SA win major trophies inspite of having a champ team. 5.people talk of his batting on spicy green tops,but only AUS has fast bowlers to exploit those conditions.medium pacers and spinners are cannon fodders without spin and reverse. 6.he was no way a matchwinner but definitely a great matchsaver. this was no way an anti kallis writeup as he was one of the all time legends but comparison to oth legds.......

  • on December 30, 2013, 12:49 GMT

    A real performance machine for the proteas. Genuine Allrounder!!

  • on December 30, 2013, 12:01 GMT

    kallis; king kallis, is among the bests that played cricket. a great batsman, bowler, fielder and a real gentleman. never ever heard anything negative about kallis. a real personification of grace and class

  • on December 30, 2013, 11:53 GMT

    best all rounder I hv seen..

  • Akhter786 on December 30, 2013, 4:15 GMT

    It is really a fairytale ending for King Kallis. He has always avoided the limelight, even in his final test. It is really not prudent to compare cricketers, and it is enough for Kallis that he is one of the best cricketer ever played the game. He is , as Dravid said, the most complete cricketer of his era. I am really fortunate to have watched these legends, Lara, Ponting, Sachin, Dravid, Akram, Mcgrath, Warne, Murli, Inzi and King Kallis in action. This is his moment he had scripted it a long way 18 years back.

  • markofcaloundra on December 29, 2013, 21:46 GMT

    I am old enough to have seen Sobers play and of course Kallis. Even early on I always had the feeling Kallis was going to be the challenger for the mantle previously held by Keith Miller and Sobers as the world's best all-lrounder. Now there are still only three..a trinity of truly the greatest allrounders. So very well done Mr Kallis, your name is there for eternity.

  • on December 30, 2013, 17:51 GMT

    I and many experts rate kallis "one of the greatest" cricketer of all time, i know that sachin, lara, ponting are more flamboynt than kallis, but as a cricketer he is more useful to his team. he has 292 wickets also. and a record 21 man of the match awards in test matches. a true legend, we will miss you kaliis, my all time top 5 ranking is: 1) Bradman the greatest, 2) Kallis and Sobers, 3) Tendulkar and Murli, 4) Lara and Warne, 5)Viv Richard, Imran, Wasim, Ponting ,MacGrath

  • on December 30, 2013, 16:23 GMT

    Well done Kallis.Thanks for the great entertainment provided over many years.All the best.

  • Dougie25 on December 30, 2013, 14:06 GMT

    All these comparisons to Sachin... Pffft. Its pretty annoying. Every cricket conversation I have with my Indian friends ends up involving Sachin. You try argue the merits of one player over another, and the response is almost always "Yeah, but Sachin..."

    Sachin was a great batsmen. He was good with the bat. The end.

    Jacques Kallis was a great CRICKETER. He was good with the bat, the ball, and as a fielder. A complete cricketer in the modern era. Worth his weight in gold.

    If I had to pick between Sachin and King Kallis? I'd take the King, purely because he is more versatile and a better all round player and could contribute one way or another.

  • sephotrig on December 30, 2013, 13:44 GMT

    To me Kallis is the greatest cricketer to play the game, for someone to score as many runs as he did, at that average, but to also take more than 200 test catches shows a phenomenal player, but for that player to also take close to 300 test wickets is an unbelievable achievement worthy of reverement. His final innings shows what a true champion he is, being out of form, to go in with his team in a position where they could have collapsed and to put together a chanceless ton. The game will be poorer for the loss of him.

  • on December 30, 2013, 12:49 GMT

    kallis is a great cricketer but certainly not the greatest.there are different facets to greatness and hence comparison with tendulkar is meaningless.... 1.never heard kallis winning many odis with his batting.if a score of 300 is on board he is practically useless.not many players survive with strike rate of 72.many SAfrican fans have questions his place in odi setup. 2.he does not counterattack due to his low range of shots.never heard him of seizing the initiative,or enforcing a strong position like the ponting ,tendulkar and lara did. 3.struggled in aus ,eng,. 4.unable to help SA win major trophies inspite of having a champ team. 5.people talk of his batting on spicy green tops,but only AUS has fast bowlers to exploit those conditions.medium pacers and spinners are cannon fodders without spin and reverse. 6.he was no way a matchwinner but definitely a great matchsaver. this was no way an anti kallis writeup as he was one of the all time legends but comparison to oth legds.......

  • on December 30, 2013, 12:49 GMT

    A real performance machine for the proteas. Genuine Allrounder!!

  • on December 30, 2013, 12:01 GMT

    kallis; king kallis, is among the bests that played cricket. a great batsman, bowler, fielder and a real gentleman. never ever heard anything negative about kallis. a real personification of grace and class

  • on December 30, 2013, 11:53 GMT

    best all rounder I hv seen..

  • on December 30, 2013, 11:48 GMT

    ofcoursr callis is one of the best crickter in the history of cricket..but sachin is one and only..he is obviously best..

  • on December 30, 2013, 11:07 GMT

    I think if Kalis has played for Another year He would have passed Tendulkar record of Higest Test Runs and Highest Test Century. Kallis is Much Better Than Tendulkar even you can say best player of last Decade

  • on December 30, 2013, 11:04 GMT

    One of the best we il miss u kallis

  • SamWintson92 on December 30, 2013, 11:01 GMT

    Kallis should have continued to play tests. There is only 3 tests remained before the world cup 2015. Kallis could have easily gone through it. Kallis is such a class player. Shame on Cullinan who said such bad things about Kallis i.e. to make him bowling allrounder, take a call on his future. Really not the kind of behavior Kallis deserves after making loads of runs for South Africa. Kallis shouldn't have reacted on Cullinan by quitting tests. Remember class is permanent.

  • on December 30, 2013, 10:46 GMT

    J.K is the best all rounders in the history of cricket. His record in all form of cricket is extraordinary amazing. He should be ranked the best all rounder of all times. Imran Khan and Gerry Sobers are the legends but i think he is of their level and grace.

    Good luck J.K, thank you for entertaining us for many years. You are the best.

  • on December 30, 2013, 10:35 GMT

    There's the cricket phrase, you're only as good your last innings. Jacques Kallis was good in his last and every previous one, with the bat or with the ball. #FinestFarewellofAll

  • on December 30, 2013, 10:03 GMT

    I had been watching cricket since 1970 , the test match played between PAK vs NZ at Dhaka(Dacca).One of the finest and gentle cricketer of this gentlemen game.I have ever seen.Though he was overshadowed by Sachin and Lara but see the remarkable contribution he made for the SA cricket.He always guided the young cricketers irrespective of his nationality. Bangladeshi cricketers are immensely benefited from him. Thanks Jack for entertaining us for long 18 years.We will miss you a lot.Wish you very happy life in the days to come.

  • Rumy1 on December 30, 2013, 8:31 GMT

    With malice or bias towards none, Kallis is arguably the greatest cricketer of the modern era. As a batsman he has a better Test career average and a better century per innings rate than our own master blaster SRT. Moreover, Kallis batting at No.4 position has a better Test average than SRT. If we look at ODi records, Kallis has an equally good batting average of 44.8 as SRT. Plus, Kallis is going at a high unlike SRT who would have lost his place at least a year ago but for BCCI's kindness. As a bowler Kallis has a better average than the likes Sobers, our own Zaheer Khan and Bhajji. With the third highest Test run aggregate, second highest number of Test centuries, second highest number of Test catches and 292 Test wickets to his name, Kallis rides above any other cricketer of the modern era.

  • ravi_hari on December 30, 2013, 8:29 GMT

    There is no one better to bank on when in need than Kallis. I think he has been one of the most consistant performer for a long time now. Being an all rounder has helped him to contribute in all formats. When compared to all rounders like Botham, Kapil and Imran, Kallis stands out for his sheer fitness and commitment. I dont think you see a SA score card without contribution with bat or ball from Kallis. Added to this his slip catching. The complete package as you may call him. In fact, parents should ask their kids to make Kallis their role model. If they can achieve 50% of what Kallis achieved, they will be most successful in any field they chose. Inspite of all this, he comes across as a humble and ready to help individual. I think SA is lucky to have him for so long. Now they would find it difficult to replace him. Philander looks good but is not of that class or commitment. By scoring a ton in his last test, Kallis has scored a point over Sachin. Quitting on home turf is perfect.

  • on December 30, 2013, 8:10 GMT

    The one of all time bests. You will be missed.

  • BradmanBestEver on December 30, 2013, 7:33 GMT

    Retired at the right time - just like Mike Hussey - very intelligent man and brilliant cricketer - best batsman of the past 25 years no doubt.

  • sherishahmir on December 30, 2013, 7:32 GMT

    Truly the legendary all rounder of modern era, humble in nature and thorough professional in all area of game i.e. batting, bowling, catching and fielding as exhibits by his career statistics. A big gap is created in South Africa cricket with the retirement of J Kallis which definitely requires lot of time to fill despite the availability of Smith,AB, Hashim, Plesis and young Cock.

  • on December 30, 2013, 7:10 GMT

    I personally think King Kallis could have continued at this level for at least another season , very difficult to list him in and amongst all time greats simply because conditions were different , I myself cannot ever see past Barry Richards as South Africas best ever purely as a batsman and despite his by comparison so few tests Mike Procter would always be my alrounder as contrary to Kalllis who would ensure South Africa never lost a test MJ Procter would win one on his own..but for those who refuse to list Procter among their elite then Kallis can only have one peer which would be Sir Gary Sobers , both miles in front of the pack.

    Thanks for the last 18 years Jacques Kallsi..

  • RMCroos on December 30, 2013, 6:33 GMT

    What a team player!!! SA cricket will miss him lot ..it will take ages to see an another Kallis... A Kallis fan from Srilanka.

  • Sandasiri_Asitha on December 30, 2013, 6:27 GMT

    Simply the Best All-rounder ever.......!!

  • on December 30, 2013, 6:22 GMT

    well played Kallis,now SA Team will be definitely poorer without you.

  • on December 30, 2013, 6:12 GMT

    Great personality Kallis a big salute for u.Kallis had continued for nother couple of years i wanted him to see going past that 51 centuries, dont retire come back kallis .....

  • on December 30, 2013, 5:17 GMT

    He really set the standards up for all-rounders, It could be a dream farewell if they could win him this match.. It already looks like one, A century combined with 200th test catch and topped with another milestone, 3rd leading run scorer of all times in tests. Cherish-able...

  • on December 30, 2013, 5:04 GMT

    Here, a true champion allrounder signing off in style. It is more appealing when he announced his retirement and performed in style. Also he is playing his last game with out being given any unnecessary hype. Perfect way to leave.

  • Arslan_Javed on December 30, 2013, 4:43 GMT

    Its always nice when on the day critiques say he should have played for extra year or two easily rather saying he should have gone two years before. For me it was a wonderful and and extra ordinary career . A lot of top class bowlers dream to get around 300 marks , and top bats dream to get 10,000 in tests/ODI. Kallis almost got that as he was far better bowler than the average bowlers of top teams these days. And as a batsman was far better then most of the players of his era. As a batsman he can be ranked in top 10 world class bats of all times. As an all rounder he is second to none already ranked up with class of Gary Sobers.

  • chathuradil on December 30, 2013, 4:16 GMT

    18 years back, still remember the early days of his career. His allround performances can not be forgotten easily. don't think it can be rewritten by any other also. holding a great career record, no matter whether it is oneday or a test. averaging over 55 in test tells the whole story, how he had played in home and on subcontinent. Surely, there should be tears in every cricket lovers eyes at the moment he scored the century in his last test. Team mates had them, Boucher his best buddy infidelity had them, I had them and also they were in his own eyes too. That was the reply given by his heart to himself and he deserves it. Yep, it is correct to call him KING kALLIS.

  • deoshatwar on December 30, 2013, 4:11 GMT

    What Kallis did all through his career, especially in the later half, was to make sure SA do not lose Tests. He would bat runs and time and grind the opposition out of contention of a win. It was then up to the bowling to close the matches up, of which they were more than capable.

  • on December 30, 2013, 4:10 GMT

    Kallis will always remember as wonderful man.

  • Sangeeth11 on December 30, 2013, 3:49 GMT

    I would disagree on the retirement when you are on top of your game. You need to retire when you feel you can no more contribute significantly to your team. When you are still on top, your team will definitely need your presence. So, in this case, Ponting has made perfect ending, and even Kallis seemed to be on slower phase. Sachin, may be , dragged a bit, but still found perfect ending.

  • on December 30, 2013, 3:27 GMT

    a perfect ending for a fantastic player.........he had played magnificient innings in the past.why he is retiring?he is still at his best

  • 0782224536 on December 30, 2013, 3:22 GMT

    there is no word for him to use about his performance in the history of cricket he is my favorite player in every format of cricket

  • on December 30, 2013, 3:14 GMT

    Though, I am a fan from India, I was still cheering for Jacques' century and I was glued to TV watching every ball knowing I wouldn't see him play live in white shirts again and was hoping that some bowler bowls a loose delivery and gives him an easy 100. I wanted team Ind to do well but at the same time how I could hope for him to get out. Emotional moment all along, had a tear when he got out and when Smith hugged and pecked his temple. Why do the legends have to retire? They are super humans, right?

  • on December 30, 2013, 2:39 GMT

    a perfect ending would be a victory but a hundred yesterday does complete a magnificent career

  • on December 30, 2013, 1:23 GMT

    Kallis batting - comparable with Tendulkar. bowling - comparable with Zaheer Khan catching - almost as many catches as MS Dhoni

  • on December 30, 2013, 1:17 GMT

    Another blow in test cricket losing a legend like J.kallis after tendulkar....

  • on December 30, 2013, 1:01 GMT

    At the age of 38 (Kallis's current age), Tendulkar had 6 more Test centuries than Kallis currently has. So I am not too sure whether Kallis would have crossed his *Test* records had he played until then. (don't forget that the slowness in his reflexes were visible in the series against Pakistan! - and against Indian bowlers, well any International batsman with a solid technique can score against their medium speed half volleys).

    @ Attractivue - Kallis still hasn't retired from ODIs, for now, let's see if he can break 'all his ODI' records. The 200 should be the easiest considering his amazing strike-rate ;)

  • on December 30, 2013, 0:50 GMT

    Wish Kallis the best of future life.He is certainly the best allrounder that cricket has ever seen and will ever see.He had a class of his own Hansome Cricketer.Deserves to be injected in all time greats.I will miss him a lot.and so will everyone who love cricket Three all time greats retired one after the other Ricky Ponting,Sachin Tendulkar and Jack Kallis A big gap in Cricket now.Once again I wish him good Health and all the best for the near future.

  • CricketChat on December 30, 2013, 0:42 GMT

    Perfect ending for Kallis! A 100 and a realistic test win against a not so bad Ind team. Now that's a dream ending most mortals hope for!

  • Vikum72 on December 30, 2013, 0:29 GMT

    The greatest all-rounder the world has seen to date. Not only his talent but the man's ability to keep himself fit in his long career is simply amazing. Kallis is a hard act to follow. Best wishes from a SL fan.

  • on December 29, 2013, 23:58 GMT

    Kallis was a great competitor and incredibly consistent, but often not that attractive to watch. Give me Tendulkar's courage and timing, or Ponting's tenacity and raw natural talent any day over Kallis. However, with 200 catches and almost 300 wickets as well, Jacques has claims for being the best all rounder ever. I didn't see Sobers play, but enough people who did have convinced me that he is still number one.

  • sudhir98 on December 29, 2013, 23:55 GMT

    Class act! But what was surreal is him walking out at the end of the day to empty stands. Come on guys, turn out tomorrow atleast and send him off in style.

  • kasifdotinfo on December 29, 2013, 23:53 GMT

    It is great to see an all-time great leave cricket in a suitable manner. However, it is sad to see an all-time great leave cricket. Kallis' retirement seems as though it may have been precipitated by a few things: rapidly earned riches from the IPL, an age approaching 40, increasing niggles, confusion about priorities, questions being raised about his place in the ODI team leading up to the World Cup, and - probably decisively - a short but sharp run of poor form.

    The man is still bowling over after over at 140 kph. His recent run-drought came after a long period away from cricket and should have been expected. He showed how good his batting still is with a difficult century here, and might now be regretting his decision. From the fan's perspective, he is still several years and records from reaching "the perfect ending". Kallis' family will probably be happy to see him retire, as will his replacement(s) in the SA team, but only he himself will know if the time was really right.

  • OhhhhhMattyMatty on December 29, 2013, 22:12 GMT

    Should have played on to get 300 wickets as well. Then he could have retired with unbeatable numbers. By then he'd have been the 2nd highest Test run scorer, possibly the highest Test catcher (outfielder) and the greatest of all time.

  • Attractivue on December 29, 2013, 20:01 GMT

    I think Kallis could have played till he was 40, Tendulkar could say good bye to all his records then!

  • on December 29, 2013, 19:46 GMT

    I have realised it is pointless arguing and opining endlessly who is the greater batsman or cricketer because even though statistics reveal a lot, there are so many objective parameters which can never be comparable. It should suffice to say Kallis is one of the greatest ever cricketers and it has been a privelege to watch him. One thing that has to be said is that he has retired while he is still on top, instead of playing needlessly till your 40. Even Dravid could have easily played on overtake Ponting but he made a timely retirement. Tendulkar dragged it a but its was still on of the saddest day for me when he retired. But Kallis? The perfect ending.

  • on December 29, 2013, 19:46 GMT

    I have realised it is pointless arguing and opining endlessly who is the greater batsman or cricketer because even though statistics reveal a lot, there are so many objective parameters which can never be comparable. It should suffice to say Kallis is one of the greatest ever cricketers and it has been a privelege to watch him. One thing that has to be said is that he has retired while he is still on top, instead of playing needlessly till your 40. Even Dravid could have easily played on overtake Ponting but he made a timely retirement. Tendulkar dragged it a but its was still on of the saddest day for me when he retired. But Kallis? The perfect ending.

  • Attractivue on December 29, 2013, 20:01 GMT

    I think Kallis could have played till he was 40, Tendulkar could say good bye to all his records then!

  • OhhhhhMattyMatty on December 29, 2013, 22:12 GMT

    Should have played on to get 300 wickets as well. Then he could have retired with unbeatable numbers. By then he'd have been the 2nd highest Test run scorer, possibly the highest Test catcher (outfielder) and the greatest of all time.

  • kasifdotinfo on December 29, 2013, 23:53 GMT

    It is great to see an all-time great leave cricket in a suitable manner. However, it is sad to see an all-time great leave cricket. Kallis' retirement seems as though it may have been precipitated by a few things: rapidly earned riches from the IPL, an age approaching 40, increasing niggles, confusion about priorities, questions being raised about his place in the ODI team leading up to the World Cup, and - probably decisively - a short but sharp run of poor form.

    The man is still bowling over after over at 140 kph. His recent run-drought came after a long period away from cricket and should have been expected. He showed how good his batting still is with a difficult century here, and might now be regretting his decision. From the fan's perspective, he is still several years and records from reaching "the perfect ending". Kallis' family will probably be happy to see him retire, as will his replacement(s) in the SA team, but only he himself will know if the time was really right.

  • sudhir98 on December 29, 2013, 23:55 GMT

    Class act! But what was surreal is him walking out at the end of the day to empty stands. Come on guys, turn out tomorrow atleast and send him off in style.

  • on December 29, 2013, 23:58 GMT

    Kallis was a great competitor and incredibly consistent, but often not that attractive to watch. Give me Tendulkar's courage and timing, or Ponting's tenacity and raw natural talent any day over Kallis. However, with 200 catches and almost 300 wickets as well, Jacques has claims for being the best all rounder ever. I didn't see Sobers play, but enough people who did have convinced me that he is still number one.

  • Vikum72 on December 30, 2013, 0:29 GMT

    The greatest all-rounder the world has seen to date. Not only his talent but the man's ability to keep himself fit in his long career is simply amazing. Kallis is a hard act to follow. Best wishes from a SL fan.

  • CricketChat on December 30, 2013, 0:42 GMT

    Perfect ending for Kallis! A 100 and a realistic test win against a not so bad Ind team. Now that's a dream ending most mortals hope for!

  • on December 30, 2013, 0:50 GMT

    Wish Kallis the best of future life.He is certainly the best allrounder that cricket has ever seen and will ever see.He had a class of his own Hansome Cricketer.Deserves to be injected in all time greats.I will miss him a lot.and so will everyone who love cricket Three all time greats retired one after the other Ricky Ponting,Sachin Tendulkar and Jack Kallis A big gap in Cricket now.Once again I wish him good Health and all the best for the near future.

  • on December 30, 2013, 1:01 GMT

    At the age of 38 (Kallis's current age), Tendulkar had 6 more Test centuries than Kallis currently has. So I am not too sure whether Kallis would have crossed his *Test* records had he played until then. (don't forget that the slowness in his reflexes were visible in the series against Pakistan! - and against Indian bowlers, well any International batsman with a solid technique can score against their medium speed half volleys).

    @ Attractivue - Kallis still hasn't retired from ODIs, for now, let's see if he can break 'all his ODI' records. The 200 should be the easiest considering his amazing strike-rate ;)