South Africa news October 2, 2013

CSA likely to introduce quota for black African players

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On the same day South Africa's domestic season gets underway, CSA will vote on a proposal which could change the way it looks. At their October 11 meeting, a decision will be taken on introducing a quota which will require franchise teams to play two black African players and provincial teams to field three. A senior official expects the motion to be approved.

The idea was one of many which came up at CSA's transformation indaba (conference) - the first one addressing racial issues they held in a decade. ESPNcricinfo has learned it was overwhelmingly welcomed at the meeting in the face of South Africa's poor record of Africanisation in the 22 years post readmission. 

"Everybody agreed that we have failed in terms of black African players and that drastic measures must be taken," Norman Arendse, CSA's lead independent director who is also chair of the transformation committee, told ESPNcricinfo. 

Since 1991, only five black African players have represented South Africa at Test level even though black Africans comprise almost 80% of the country's population. Makhaya Ntini is the only one who has played more than 100 Tests, with his number of caps coming in at 101, while Mfuneko Ngam, Thami Tsolekile, Monde Zondeki and Lonwabo Tsotsobe have appeared in 17 matches all told. 

By contrast, 11 mixed-race players have donned the whites and three of Asian origin, including Pakistani-born legspinner Imran Tahir. Arendse said those cricketers, including the likes of Vernon Philander and Hashim Amla, illustrate the success of targets. 

South Africa introduced a quota system in 1998 to address the racial discrimination caused by the Apartheid system. The stipulation then was that every team had to field four players of colour - a term which encompasses black Africans, mixed-race people and those of Asian descent. It was officially removed in 2007. 

While Arendse hailed its achievements, he also explained that it shed light on the true nature of racial segregation in South Africa. "It showed us the stark disparity caused by Apartheid and how the black African community often had it a lot worse," he said.

"There are two obvious reasons why we don't see as many black African players coming through. One is the socio-economic conditions facing black African youngsters compared to their counterparts, especially as cricket is still very much a middle-class game. And the other is downright racism. There is enough black African talent but it seems to get lost." 

A recent report presented to CSA contained information that most black African players give up the game between the under-19 and provincial level, at an age at which, if they are not contracted, will need to find jobs. Arendse's other point was also underlined in the report as it revealed when black African players do get into the system, they are often further sidelined. Only two black African players turned out in more than 80% of their franchises' games last season and when they did, they bowled less overs and batted lower down than players of other races.

CSA is hopeful this will change if the proposal is approved next Friday, the same day the domestic one-day cup gets underway. Although the ruling, if passed, will not apply for the first round of matches, it could be implemented immediately thereafter and may raise concerns about the practicality of such a decision for franchises. 

In reality, all franchises except the Cobras would be able to meet the requirement immediately. The Cobras only have one black African on their books, left-arm spinner Siya Simetu. The Dolphins and Knights have each contracted two black African players, the Titans three, the Warriors four and the Lions have the most, at seven. 

Sources close to the franchise system said the possibility of some franchises loaning out their black African players to other teams in order to meet the quota also exists. "Sometimes a player won't get game time at his franchise because there will be too much competition for places," the insider said. "It's important that we ensure the players get adequate game time so there would be nothing wrong in them being sent to play for other teams."

That may defeat the purpose of unearthing and nurturing black talent and Arendse seems hopeful that will not happen. "What we need is for franchises to have four or six black African players in their set-up so that there is internal competition for places. One of the criticisms of the quota system is that it guarantees a player a place in the team but if there are more than the required number, you will be able to counter that," he said. "What we've also seen is that before long, the minimum is far exceeded and that is what we need to build a base." 

The lack of black African players has stood out most starkly in the Test team, which has not fielded a black African since January 2011. Arendse said the national selectors mentioned they get criticised for not picking black African players but their hands are tied because "they only have a handful to choose from". So CSA has taken it on themselves to "broaden the pool of black African players".

Cricket is not the only sport to be mulling quotas as a means to advance the cause of players of colour. In August, SA Rugby announced they would introduce a quota from next season which will require teams in the Vodacom Cup, the second-tier domestic tournament, to have seven players of colour in their 22-man squad and field at least five in the starting XV.

Firdose Moonda is ESPNcricinfo's South Africa correspondent

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • larafan400 on October 3, 2013, 10:43 GMT

    I just think this is really the wrong way to approach this. Ultimately, if the quality is there, a player should be picked - it doesn't matter what their background or ethnicity is! Surely it's more important to ensure that the selectors themselves are not being prejudice in any way? And if they are, then they shouldn't be selectors.

    This kind of policy will only disenfranchise young white South Africans, and also the black players that are picked may begin to question if they're being picked because they truly are the best, or only to meet this quota and it'll end up destroying their confidence.

    Makhaya Ntini and Hashim Amla are great examples of non-white players who have gone on to become legends for their country because of their cricketing skills, not because of their colour. And no one can argue that either of them were in the side for anything other than that. This is how it should be.

  • Anil_Koshy on October 3, 2013, 3:55 GMT

    The quota system will never benefit cricketers as it will push them only backwards, the only way to promote cricket among their community by developing infrastructure and providing best of facilities that will enable potential cricketers to come up and showcase their talent. One way could be giving them representation in domestic circuit, but not at international level. India is the best example to prove how bad the quota system, nobody benefits from this, this only divides the society.

  • on October 3, 2013, 3:00 GMT

    While I applaud CSA on their stance on racism I'm not sure a quota system is the right way to go. Long term having the quota system in place may result in a weakening of south African cricket if more talented players are being over looked in order to meet the quota. I'm of the position that the best players should be playing regardless of ethnicity. You could almost argue this quota system is discriminating against other ethnicities...

  • on October 5, 2013, 11:31 GMT

    Sport and Politics do not go hand in hand its simple as that ! Yes for sure improve the root of the issues African people had to endure . What should occur is the predominately African government should dig into their deep pockets and INVEST in SERIOUS and URGENT programmes runned by passionate people ! At professional level merit is the only way to select . The overall outcome from this political ideology is demoralize athletes encourage athletes to move abroad potentially improving rivals and it does create an imbalance within teams.

  • Great_Nate on October 4, 2013, 15:12 GMT

    Currently teams have a quote of non-white players. Putting in a quota of black players discriminates against the minorites. It will mean previously descriminated against minorites are discriminated against as they will lose positions to those who are the majority in the country.

  • Gordo85 on October 4, 2013, 14:56 GMT

    To me as long as any player has been playing well and showing good form over a long period of time they will get selected. Talent is important to notice it early on but the problem is you don't want to rush some players through way too quickly and have pressure on them. One thing I have noticed is that in England in the latest Ashes Series in England that some players have done well over time and they get selected yet their own form hasn't been too flash hot, to me you need to select players who are playing well and also who deserve to be in the team. I don't have the luxury of watching these domestic cricket talents coming through the ranks in South African Cricket but I still get updates and watch how games are going through this website and one thing I noticed in the past is that lots of players seem to be getting ignored yet their stats look amazing to me now I know stats aren't everything, they need good attitude. I want people to watch them play like scouts and check stats often.

  • on October 4, 2013, 12:14 GMT

    Most of us agree that some form of redress is required, but what the CSA [like the government] is doing here, is abdicating responsibility. What is the CSA [or government] doing to help people from grass-roots level? At schools? In communities? By blame-shifting onto the franchises, provincial or national teams they are pointing fingers at the wrong people - they should be pointing their fingers at themselves. Uplift the young cricketers and the provinces and franchises will quickly snap them up into their academies and teams where they will greatly benefit. Government is by the people, for the people. The same goes for the CSA. The easiest way for CSA to handle this is quickly blame someone else for their OWN shortcomings! An OLD political trick used across the world...

  • OupootZA on October 4, 2013, 11:55 GMT

    Why do so many young black cricketers in SA not go thru to play professional cricket? IMHO, there are many reasons. 1. Most young black cricketers are relatively good in many sports - other sporting codes may offer better support, pay & long term prospects than does professional cricket 2. Promising black cricketers face pressure from families to pursue a stable job with good pay than pro-cricket where future pay prospects are uncertain. Quotas may address this; indeed nearly all notable black African pro-cricketers in SA came to prominence during the quota period 3. Successful young black talent in SA are highly priced in business and govt, further competition for their talent 4. In most professional sport codes, those at top level are richly rewarded, but those at mid/lower/semi-professional levels are not. Rather, they are often supported by family or friends, but many black cricketers in SA don't have this "luxury"; rather, its the often the opposite.

  • mahjut on October 4, 2013, 9:00 GMT

    Cpt Meanster - yes soccer is much more popular ... it's always been far, far more accessible. However, there are enough black cricketers in SA to work with and clearly that in itself means that enough are interested despite the hindrances ... the aim here is to prevent them - knowing they aren't going to be picked up and nutured and needing an income - seek jobs (post under 19) as well as ensuring that those that do get through get picked more often.

  • Aashir.B on October 4, 2013, 5:52 GMT

    @Cpt.Meanster, I am a South African and you've got it spot on. The vast majority of black South Africans do not like, watch or take any interest in cricket as they are extremely passionate about soccer. To compound this problem, our national television broadcaster has stopped airing test matches on free television channels. How can the game of cricket be promoted to a community of people that have a greater passion for soccer when they can not view it for free and cannot afford satellite television? Lets also not forget that black South Africans are not the only previously disadvantaged community in South Africa and that quota systems in any sphere of life creates divides and greater animosity than giving everyone equal rights and opportunities.

  • larafan400 on October 3, 2013, 10:43 GMT

    I just think this is really the wrong way to approach this. Ultimately, if the quality is there, a player should be picked - it doesn't matter what their background or ethnicity is! Surely it's more important to ensure that the selectors themselves are not being prejudice in any way? And if they are, then they shouldn't be selectors.

    This kind of policy will only disenfranchise young white South Africans, and also the black players that are picked may begin to question if they're being picked because they truly are the best, or only to meet this quota and it'll end up destroying their confidence.

    Makhaya Ntini and Hashim Amla are great examples of non-white players who have gone on to become legends for their country because of their cricketing skills, not because of their colour. And no one can argue that either of them were in the side for anything other than that. This is how it should be.

  • Anil_Koshy on October 3, 2013, 3:55 GMT

    The quota system will never benefit cricketers as it will push them only backwards, the only way to promote cricket among their community by developing infrastructure and providing best of facilities that will enable potential cricketers to come up and showcase their talent. One way could be giving them representation in domestic circuit, but not at international level. India is the best example to prove how bad the quota system, nobody benefits from this, this only divides the society.

  • on October 3, 2013, 3:00 GMT

    While I applaud CSA on their stance on racism I'm not sure a quota system is the right way to go. Long term having the quota system in place may result in a weakening of south African cricket if more talented players are being over looked in order to meet the quota. I'm of the position that the best players should be playing regardless of ethnicity. You could almost argue this quota system is discriminating against other ethnicities...

  • on October 5, 2013, 11:31 GMT

    Sport and Politics do not go hand in hand its simple as that ! Yes for sure improve the root of the issues African people had to endure . What should occur is the predominately African government should dig into their deep pockets and INVEST in SERIOUS and URGENT programmes runned by passionate people ! At professional level merit is the only way to select . The overall outcome from this political ideology is demoralize athletes encourage athletes to move abroad potentially improving rivals and it does create an imbalance within teams.

  • Great_Nate on October 4, 2013, 15:12 GMT

    Currently teams have a quote of non-white players. Putting in a quota of black players discriminates against the minorites. It will mean previously descriminated against minorites are discriminated against as they will lose positions to those who are the majority in the country.

  • Gordo85 on October 4, 2013, 14:56 GMT

    To me as long as any player has been playing well and showing good form over a long period of time they will get selected. Talent is important to notice it early on but the problem is you don't want to rush some players through way too quickly and have pressure on them. One thing I have noticed is that in England in the latest Ashes Series in England that some players have done well over time and they get selected yet their own form hasn't been too flash hot, to me you need to select players who are playing well and also who deserve to be in the team. I don't have the luxury of watching these domestic cricket talents coming through the ranks in South African Cricket but I still get updates and watch how games are going through this website and one thing I noticed in the past is that lots of players seem to be getting ignored yet their stats look amazing to me now I know stats aren't everything, they need good attitude. I want people to watch them play like scouts and check stats often.

  • on October 4, 2013, 12:14 GMT

    Most of us agree that some form of redress is required, but what the CSA [like the government] is doing here, is abdicating responsibility. What is the CSA [or government] doing to help people from grass-roots level? At schools? In communities? By blame-shifting onto the franchises, provincial or national teams they are pointing fingers at the wrong people - they should be pointing their fingers at themselves. Uplift the young cricketers and the provinces and franchises will quickly snap them up into their academies and teams where they will greatly benefit. Government is by the people, for the people. The same goes for the CSA. The easiest way for CSA to handle this is quickly blame someone else for their OWN shortcomings! An OLD political trick used across the world...

  • OupootZA on October 4, 2013, 11:55 GMT

    Why do so many young black cricketers in SA not go thru to play professional cricket? IMHO, there are many reasons. 1. Most young black cricketers are relatively good in many sports - other sporting codes may offer better support, pay & long term prospects than does professional cricket 2. Promising black cricketers face pressure from families to pursue a stable job with good pay than pro-cricket where future pay prospects are uncertain. Quotas may address this; indeed nearly all notable black African pro-cricketers in SA came to prominence during the quota period 3. Successful young black talent in SA are highly priced in business and govt, further competition for their talent 4. In most professional sport codes, those at top level are richly rewarded, but those at mid/lower/semi-professional levels are not. Rather, they are often supported by family or friends, but many black cricketers in SA don't have this "luxury"; rather, its the often the opposite.

  • mahjut on October 4, 2013, 9:00 GMT

    Cpt Meanster - yes soccer is much more popular ... it's always been far, far more accessible. However, there are enough black cricketers in SA to work with and clearly that in itself means that enough are interested despite the hindrances ... the aim here is to prevent them - knowing they aren't going to be picked up and nutured and needing an income - seek jobs (post under 19) as well as ensuring that those that do get through get picked more often.

  • Aashir.B on October 4, 2013, 5:52 GMT

    @Cpt.Meanster, I am a South African and you've got it spot on. The vast majority of black South Africans do not like, watch or take any interest in cricket as they are extremely passionate about soccer. To compound this problem, our national television broadcaster has stopped airing test matches on free television channels. How can the game of cricket be promoted to a community of people that have a greater passion for soccer when they can not view it for free and cannot afford satellite television? Lets also not forget that black South Africans are not the only previously disadvantaged community in South Africa and that quota systems in any sphere of life creates divides and greater animosity than giving everyone equal rights and opportunities.

  • Cpt.Meanster on October 4, 2013, 1:39 GMT

    Okay, I went away and did some research. It seems a vast majority of black South Africans prefer soccer/football compared to cricket. And this goes back all the way to the apartheid era as well. Obviously, blacks weren't allowed to express themselves during that hostile regime. But is that true ? The fact that black South Africans love soccer more than cricket and prefer to take up that sport. Cause, I keep hearing and reading about it everywhere. Also, how is the representation of blacks in rugby because I know rugby is a big deal in SA with the Springboks. Somebody please enlighten me. I would prefer a South African to do so. Thanks.

  • Robster1 on October 3, 2013, 23:03 GMT

    The only result from this misguided policy is that further wedges will be driven between races. Encourage and support all to progress - quotas are merely the tool of politicians and we all know about them....Tokenism is not the way ahead in SA. And yes, India of all countries with its wretched social systems need to change most of all.

  • GrindAR on October 3, 2013, 17:01 GMT

    @yoohoo: Very good point. Permanant quota system will damage the quality of the game. You openup a window and gather main XI and banch strength enough and then close it only on national team representation. But it should continue for a while in a relatively scaled down/up funding grooming talent pool

  • 2nd_Slip on October 3, 2013, 16:43 GMT

    @legend2402 totally agree with you on that one. Implementing quotas wont do anybody any good but rather hamper SA's progress. A player has to be in a team purely on merit.

  • simonviller on October 3, 2013, 15:20 GMT

    I agree with CSA for taking this [affirmative action ] approach to the sport . It's obvious that other methods are not working . Some are saying that it would deny other talented players the opportunity ; but in the same way the present system is denying those black players with greater talents from comining forward . This action does not ,or should not, imply that a player of colour is selected unconditionally , but that those black players with the ability are given a fair chance . Think of an America without a quota system in their educational institutions during the earlier years . I would say the whole world has benefitted and similarly woud cricket .

  • silverpie2 on October 3, 2013, 15:16 GMT

    A question about South African cricket in general--how common is it for players to go outside their home area for either provincial or franchise level? I noticed the mention of the Cobras, who represent a province that was less than one-third black in the 2011 census.

  • on October 3, 2013, 15:03 GMT

    has anyone asked the cricketers what they feel is right? i believe that they want to be selected because they deserve it and not because of the color of their skin. let SA work harder at developiing cricket in poorer areas and in poorer schools. but choosing players because of their skin color ultimately means the better players get overlooked, lose hope and go play elsewhere. and english cricket will keep getting stronger and stronger with all our players.

  • on October 3, 2013, 14:55 GMT

    All we have to do is think back to when quotas were introduced in 1998 and see what that did for the country's cricket....hoards of players left our shores to ply their trade elsewhere. Is that what we want? And then they go on to play for their newly adopted countries.

    KP, Trott, Kieswetter for England. Kruger van Wyk, Wagner, Elliott, and almost Johan Myburgh for NZ. Both Pothas and Claude Henderson easily could have walked into the England team but for their ages, maybe Ant Botha too. Wayne Madsen and Rikki Wessels left. Hansie almost quit over quotas. Boje DID quit over quotas. Regardless of what he says, Paul Harris quit over quotas (Peterson and Tahir took his place). Johan Botha left because Peterson cracked the nod. Jacques Rudolph left for 4 years because of quotas.

    This will just happen again, and then I suppose the franchises will be left with nothing except black Africans to choose from. Perhaps that is CSA's overriding goal.

  • on October 3, 2013, 14:20 GMT

    I feel that cricket is reacting to Government pressure in SA. The Government needs to invest in the future of young players of colour by providing funding for facilities, equipment etc. so these players can develop naturally. This is an expensive sport and forcing cricket to fund one group more than another - otherwise SA is forced to field a compromise eleven, when it is the responsibility of the Governments to provide for all basic sport education, grass-root training, support etc. All this reaction to Govt. malaise will cause is more "Kevin Petersons" running to England or other benefiting countries. Sad really.

  • yoohoo on October 3, 2013, 14:07 GMT

    The biggest problem with quota systems is that they never get removed. Even after it serves the purpose and does some good, the quota is continued and it turns into a huge heartburn for everybody.

    That said, CSA has proved that that they are capable of stopping the 'quota' system once it fulfils its usefulness, when they removed the 1998 coloured players quota in 2007 after it served its purpose. So, they can be trusted with another quota, and to remove it once its usefulness is over.

  • figjamfan on October 3, 2013, 14:01 GMT

    I've always thought that the quota system is a slap in the face to players that get picked because they've earned the right to be there. Players like Makhaya Ntini, Monde Zondeki, Mangaliso Mosehle, Thami Tsolikele, Temba Bavuma, Loots Bosman, Lonwabo Tsotsobe, Aaron Phangiso, Mfuneko Ngam, Khaya Zondo and Mthokozisi Shezi have earned their positions in their respected teams.

  • landl47 on October 3, 2013, 13:12 GMT

    The problem is that this doesn't address the cause of the issue. Players would be selected if they were able to develop their talents adequately. The real problem is that facilities don't exist for them to do that.

    I hope this might kickstart a movement to put in place facilities for young cricketers to develop their skills. It's not the solution, but it might be the beginning of the solution. Give it a chance.

  • EltonB on October 3, 2013, 12:42 GMT

    While I support the theory that, IDEALLY the selectors should select players on talent/ability. I realize that these are not ideal circumstances. Further, Anyone who seems convinced that there is nothing wrong with the current mode of operation, in which certain talents are marginalized and bypassed because their skin colour is wrong, will have a hard time convincing me that they're not racist.

  • on October 3, 2013, 11:11 GMT

    I believe this to be a long overdue initiative, provincial teams and franchises needs to be intentional with developing black talent and not wait for a talented individual to pop up. It's no coincidence the Lions has the most contracted black players, they hired a black coach and transformation followed. Today he is performing very well, but the franchise made the decision to bring about change and not maintain the status quo. Something needed to change, because the stats indicate that the natural cricket development channels in RSA are not working. Good going CSA.

  • legend2402 on October 3, 2013, 10:19 GMT

    i would have to totally agree with comments anil koshy made, its been 19 years since readmission, and our infrustracture is not right! That is the problem! I am a private cricket coach, of which i coach 2 african black children who are very talented and could go very far 1 day if they guided properly, but there schools they go to are not great cricket schools and that is the problem, its the infrustructure, talent we have loads of, white, indian, colored, black, its the infrustructure we need to address, not forcing players to play for there province or country cause of there colour, imagine how that must affect that player playing for his country/province, cause of his colour, not cause he his good enough? mentally he will not be there, and again, the system will fail! CSA need to wake up just like our government, hire the right people for the job, and concentrate on sorting out our youth!

  • on October 3, 2013, 10:13 GMT

    22 years on and we still make the same mistakes. Transformation starts at grassroots. At the top level you have to select your best team, giving your team the best chance to win. Since SA have been the no1 test team, more and more people are interested in test cricket...more so than ever. This will lead the young 'uns to want to play cricket. If the structures are set up at grassroots then we WILL develop new and exciting young black cricketers, the likes of Makhaya! But if you select a mediocre team, based on tokenism, then the chance of winning is far less, and the game just will not grow! Surely those in the know can see this??

  • ZMPK on October 3, 2013, 10:11 GMT

    sad to hear that the cricketers will now be selected as per the color of their skin

  • on October 3, 2013, 9:58 GMT

    Isn't it time they moved on and not backwards. Ridiculous

  • on October 3, 2013, 9:51 GMT

    "Since 1991, only five black African players have represented South Africa at Test level even though black Africans comprise almost 80% of the country's population" I feel this is irrelevant. The relevant figure is the % of cricketers in my opinion.

  • on October 3, 2013, 9:42 GMT

    oh great, yet another batch of promising South Africans moving to England to play Test Cricket.

  • Stark62 on October 3, 2013, 9:29 GMT

    I have no idea why CSA need to implement a quota system because if your not good enough to represent a team, then you're just not good enough.

    It shouldn't matter whether there are more white or black players within a team because only a deserving personnel should be selected, irrespective of ethnicity or colour.

  • on October 3, 2013, 9:28 GMT

    Transformation in Zimbabwe was necessary, and Zimbabwes problems are not because of the transofrmation issue but of the mismanagement of the game at the top. There might be a bit of a problem to begin with but such is the case with any new venture and this is a long term plan so it will bear fruit.

  • nursery_ender on October 3, 2013, 9:21 GMT

    Dirty dozen: you think Strauss ddin't play for SA because of the quota system? I didn't even know SA had an under 6 team, let alone that Strauss wasn't picked for it.

    How many times do the England bashers need to be reminded? Strauss left SA at the age of six. All his development was in England. He plays for England. Is it really that difficult to grasp?

  • on October 3, 2013, 9:05 GMT

    @Vic010 - You hit the nail on the head. but...fielding the best side is not good policy according to them clearly. We need to make sure that all our sports are represented by the opposite of what our sides represented during apartheid - now THATS a recipe for success?! Oh wait...we are an African country...and African countries are always at the bottom of the food chain so if we end up losing all of our cricket games it would be ok...cos the rest of the world feels sorry for Africa anyway. I could never personally reach our provincial A side at school...because we were told...we had to have 4 players of colour in the side.... A couple of years ago I was given an interview at a large corporation...5 mins later they phoned me to ask if I was black...to which I replied "no"..so they said I shouldn't bother. no sarcasm...but that's apartheid all over again.

  • Captainman on October 3, 2013, 8:44 GMT

    This article just confirms that the popularity of Cricket in South Africa is small. I remember the test series with Pakistan earlier in the year and South Africa just cannot attract a very good crowd.

  • on October 3, 2013, 8:27 GMT

    What a Shame. Quota system?? CSA should select all players according to the talent not with their colour..

  • on October 3, 2013, 8:09 GMT

    talent should get you selected not the colour of your skin, ridiculous!

  • dirtydozen on October 3, 2013, 8:05 GMT

    don't do it south africa or it will turn out like zimbabwe. Several talented players like talented players would be left out and will turn to play for england, new zealand(eg... strauss, trott,pieterson wagner). Please SA don't do it otherwise it will mark the decline of the team. Please don't do it.

  • Shazy777 on October 3, 2013, 8:04 GMT

    very poor decisions... Sad news for S.A fans... Why do we need a quota system? If they good enough they can represent any team... Due to quota system we lose many playerx in near future... Come on CSA get fair selection... select the layer on their merit not on colour...

  • CricIndia208 on October 3, 2013, 7:20 GMT

    This is necessary to redress the injustice committed during the apartheid era.

  • on October 3, 2013, 7:19 GMT

    Quota systems suck. But spare a thought for the underlying problem. How do you rectify decades if not centuries of oppression that has led to the previously privileged class to retain its privilege, but the oppressed ones are to start afresh?

  • Vic010 on October 3, 2013, 7:19 GMT

    I think some clarification is needed here with regards to the players listed above: Mfuneko Ngam - awesome but injured all the time Thami Tsolekile - not good enough, could not compete with Mark Boucher Monde Zondeki - not good enough Lonwabo Tsotsobe - not good enough at the moment.

  • crazyrocker on October 3, 2013, 7:14 GMT

    This is real shame for CSA Board for introducing quota and not stressing more importance to the merit. Purely on performance should be the selection. For this CSA board has to be blamed for chosing the incompatible bunch of selectors. This decision will have a big disastrous impact to SA cricket.

  • DangaGanga on October 3, 2013, 7:09 GMT

    This is very disappointing for South African cricket we need our sides to be chosen on merit not on their race. The reason we the best side in the world is because our players represent an integrated nation. Let's not change something that's working. Is there going to quotas for the football side?

  • mihir_nam on October 3, 2013, 7:06 GMT

    Wow Fantastic news for England ;) Common England cheer-up more players coming your way . Well CSA common i agree game needs promotion among native south African community . But this is not the way spend more on Infrastructure in Native African schools and localities .

  • ZCFOutkast on October 3, 2013, 7:02 GMT

    Frankly, I find a lot of the comments here to be highly disturbing! After over 22 years of continuous top flight cricket in a country of over 41 million Africans, you mean to tell me that we don't have at least 12 African players who can play at Franchise level & 18 at Provincial level - all of whom are talented and can hold their spot on merit!? Over 70% of the cricketers in the country are African!

    What's all this talk about weakening South Africa? Are you guys listening to yourselves? The quota is needed to address some deliberate tendencies to overlook capable African cricketers. The fact that there is such a huge outcry from the comments, plus the scale of concerns expressed over such a small number, indirectly proves that kind of discrimination exists. If you are of the opinion that Africans are inferior cricketers, or we have none that are sufficiently competent then you're misleading yourself. Actually 2&3 respectively is a joke. Should be more!

    @Ahamed Mansoor - thank you!

  • on October 3, 2013, 7:00 GMT

    This is terrible. People should be picked because of their talent, not because of the colour of their skin. Can you imagine being one of these black cricketers who get selected? They are going to begin their career shrouded in doubt about whether they were selected because they are good enough, or because they are part of the quota system.

    Sport in general is one of the few activities in this word that can unite a country, please do not destroy that with silly politics!

  • on October 3, 2013, 6:44 GMT

    I don't care if the SA team or my domestic team is made up of 11 white Afrikaners or 11 black Africans, just make sure they are the best 11 players available!!!! Totally against quotas. I'm not against transformation, however, it needs to start at grassroots level, improving facilities and infrastructure in previously disadvantaged areas, etc. Quotas are a band-aid for a bullet wound.

  • mcsdl on October 3, 2013, 6:35 GMT

    In short-term this looks ugly and its logical to say pick players by merit not by their skin colour. But when you look at it long term quota system is a step forward in the right direction, because this will give more opportunity to black players to represent the country - and the whole country will start loving Cricket as the blacks (80% of SA) will see people like them selves playing for the team and will start following the sport more than ever - Look at Ntini's example..... Which will also give added benifits such as increase in development at grass root level, more media money, packed stadiums etc. As the current South African cricket team have set a such a high playing standard, it's difficult to say whether this method would improve the team in long term or not. But this is the right thing to do in long term for the sake of majority of black people live in that country (Although it sounds not fair on others...!)

  • on October 3, 2013, 6:18 GMT

    No intention or sounding racist, but they shouldn't make a quota. It should strictly be each team fields their best XI and the provinces shouldn't make colour a factor when picking who comes up through the youth systems and into the domestic competitions. If there is an issue with giving the younger 'black' Africans a fair go, it needs to be fixed at grassroots level, through the junior systems and club levels, by giving everybody a fair chance to get themselves to the top level. Cricket, like politics and life in general, will only advance if everybody is treated as an equal, and the quota system implies that the 'black' Africans aren't as good and are being put in for PR purposes.

  • Brenton1 on October 3, 2013, 5:26 GMT

    If players are good enough then they should play. Quotas will only lower the standard of cricket. I play league cricket in the eastern cape. It is shocking to see some of the teams playing in the higher leagues which would easily be defeated by the team I play for. How about fixing the league structures and increasing the skill of young and up coming players rather than forcing teams to select substandard players. No to Quotas and No to anyone supporting it.

  • on October 3, 2013, 4:57 GMT

    this is just disgusting...this rule wil only make gud players to go to england & settle ther ,few examples are:Kevin Pieterson,Kieswtter,Trott,etc.. so this wil be the end of Southafrican Cricket.Am a dieahrd fan of S.A cricket.but nw am withdrawing my support ..gud luck S.A

  • on October 3, 2013, 4:56 GMT

    Why should the team suffer if the selectors are too lazy to investigate how well players are performing in lower levels?? the quota system is just a bandaid approach that limits the team that it is implemented on. All players should be picked on merit alone, but also that every player striving to get into any such team be given the same opportunity. To fix the problems, get your infrastructure and management in line to give ALL up and coming players the same chance.

  • Gurudumu on October 3, 2013, 4:55 GMT

    Instituting a quota system in cricket will not ensure Black players don whites for the Test team. Selection must be based on merit - having the requisite skill, technique and temperament. No one seems to complaining of the small number of non-blacks playing soccer for SA. What is being advocated here is a recipe for disaster!

  • hb1970 on October 3, 2013, 4:48 GMT

    @Cpt.Meanster, the black South African was robbed of showing his talent due to the apartheid system which ended not long ago. Quota is the way to go to encourage them. South Africans know it best and I applaud CSA for trying this step. I hope to see some regular blacks in the Test team in the future.

  • johnathonjosephs on October 3, 2013, 3:54 GMT

    For getting more popularity for the sport in the country, we do need different players in the team. Tsotsobe definitely deserves to be one of the 3 fast bowlers.

  • BRUTALANALYST on October 3, 2013, 2:19 GMT

    Quotas in sport are never a good idea how about S.A just spend way more money and help develop facilities across the board in the areas that need it most.

  • on October 3, 2013, 2:06 GMT

    Capt. Meanster, dont forget that South Africa is the #1 Test team in the world. And the team that KP now plays for, England, was handed perhaps the worst mauling by South Africa in the history of Test cricket in a matchup between the top 2 Test teams. Just in case you do not remember, South Africa lost only two (2) wickets in beating England who scored over 600 runs in that Test match

  • on October 3, 2013, 1:45 GMT

    Its apparent that some of the commenters are either too young, or ignorant or both about how vile the system of apartheid (pronounced apart-hate) was (is?). Ignorance is neither bliss nor an excuse. That being said, there are quotas in the Indian Premier League regarding the number of overseas players who can appear in a game for a franchise. Similar situation applies in the Caribbean Premier League. In County cricket. Big Bash. A quota is a quota, whatever lipstick nyou might want to put on it. And any quota that has to do with inclusiveness ought to be a good thing. Apartheid (pronounced apart-hate) is off the books. But has it ended?

  • on October 3, 2013, 0:34 GMT

    Probably a good thing at state and first class, but not at international test level where best available. One day and t20 maybe. Might be a boost to international cricket of the rest of the world, wagner and elliot come to mind

  • j2mach on October 3, 2013, 0:29 GMT

    This is totally unfair. If people want to be treated equal, then they should not put rules and quotas in place that help them gain selection based on skin color. They should be picked on their skills and talent. What happens if a player isn't picked because selectors are forced to pick another to fill their quota - isn't that discrimination? What a joke!

  • on October 3, 2013, 0:17 GMT

    This is ridiculous. You pick people based on skills, not race!

  • on October 2, 2013, 23:48 GMT

    This is an inspired move by CSA. Some may see this as a backward step. I applaud them. I think this will unearth some of the greatest players our humble game of cricket has ever witnessed. Please God that i am alive when South Africa find those guys. Not that Steyn and co are rubbish of course, they're Amazing too.

  • on October 2, 2013, 23:30 GMT

    @Cpt.Meanster - Sports has never come down to skills and genuine talent. Things like economics, geographical location, class, sheer luck, etc. are all huge factors. Even skills and genuine talent are heavily mediated by such things. If a player in South Africa pre-boycott had the skills of Bradman, Grace, Khan and Tendulkar combined, he would still never have got to play test cricket. So it's time to let go of the platitudes and delusions and deal with reality, namely that SA can and should do much better on the subject of race and cricket.

  • on October 2, 2013, 22:35 GMT

    Selections should be based on talent and merit, not skin colour.

  • gmoturu1 on October 2, 2013, 22:24 GMT

    @cnksnk the reason India does not have a quota system in sports is because a very little percentage of India's population earn their living in sports. as simple as that

  • Nutcutlet on October 2, 2013, 22:14 GMT

    For a quota system to work properly, it has to demonstrate that there has been a genuine & sustained long-term investment in bringing cricket to the black school population of SA en masse. Something that is just hurriedly foisted on CSA, when the players who are deemed 'good enough' to fulfil the quota are manifestly not at the standard of their counterparts will only build resentment. Furthermore, it will be unfair on those black players who will be shown up as being short of the necessary standard. In other words, a quota system can only be justified when there is enough genuine talent among the black cricketers to justify its implementation. This must therefore be a long-term project (say 3 years minimum) & a reality check is required before a knee-jerk political decision is implemented. Otherwise, it will inevitably lead to another 2007-type volte face & that merely erodes credibility in those that imposed the quota system in the first place. Politicans, be wise, not hasty!

  • SCC08 on October 2, 2013, 22:10 GMT

    @ Cricket_is_Unpopular - your so right, Zim do it much better.. Most of there better players reject contracts / retire from international cricket to take up county offers: Jarvis, Ervine x 2 etc.. And as for Kenya, haven't they just developed so well. #joumasepoes

  • ARad on October 2, 2013, 22:08 GMT

    I am all for setting up the environment so that more players from different socio-economic and racial/ethnic/tribal backgrounds are able to play top level cricket but giving quotas is not really helpful. Being a player for a province, for example, automatically becomes less valuable if the players are not picked on merit. Worse if you are a talented black cricketer since you have to carry the stigma of being chosen via quota rather than merit. CSA should figure out how to make more blacks adopt cricket and when sufficient number of talented players come through, the first class system can expand to include them. Skilled players necessitating additional teams versus quotas to necessitate extra spots that dilute first class cricket - which strategy is best for South African Cricket?

  • SCC08 on October 2, 2013, 22:03 GMT

    "A recent report presented to CSA contained information that most black African players give up the game between the under-19 and provincial level, at an age at which, if they are not contracted, will need to find jobs" - um, what about playing the game you love at an amateur level? Look at this Cricket lovers, don't ignore what is happening here.... How can people point fingers at the likes of Trott / Kp etc.. Simply disgusting.

  • kalyanbk on October 2, 2013, 21:57 GMT

    SA first needs to ensure that Black African Players are nourished at the grassroots level so they can compete on an equal footing for national selection. Coming from India I can tell you Quotas have ruined this country and the only ones to benefit are politicians, administrators and bureaucrats and not the people.

  • on October 2, 2013, 21:49 GMT

    I support transformation as long as black players are selected based on merit and not race. Can CSA guarantee this? I doubt it.

  • Chris_P on October 2, 2013, 21:16 GMT

    I would suggest that a real attempt at grass roots level for cricket introduction would deliver the long term results they are seeking. I am not a big fan of compromising teams just to accommodate the political correctness society of the world. If they are good enough, select them, irregardless of age,, race, colour or creed, it is when they DON'T get selected is when we should stand up and complain. In Australia, I have been involved in indigenous cricket squads for a number of years & there isn't one aboriginal playing fc cricket or even close mainly due to the fact they choose to play other sports. This despite a big push by CA a few years back with English tours etc etc.

  • runsandwickets on October 2, 2013, 21:12 GMT

    Taking cricket to lower middle and lower class would be the best alternative to support all. Tournaments that CSA conducts need to encourage more coloured players at least 12 in the squad of 25 and in Franchise tournaments teams should have at least 10 in the squad of 25. This should help CSA achieve its goal of equating everyone. Still with 80 % black population and football being their more favourite its a way to keep up the white dominance through cricket. Once the socio - economic condition improve one day they are going to the almost the whole place then why not at least give them an equal chance.The reservation of only 2 black players in South African squad would bring no change. CSA's earlier similar rule tries have failed too. To properly encourage black talent it too should be encouraged to 4-5.

  • Newlandsfaithful on October 2, 2013, 20:26 GMT

    It really makes me sad to see the whole thing boiling down to quotas. It really is pig-headed way of dealing with an issue that is far deeper than the antiquated rhetoric of the "blame the legacy of apartheid" era, to which Arendse subscribes. The fact is that the racial profile of cricket players in South Africa is a reflection of the economic demographics of the country. The poorer communities who watch the national broadcaster (SABC) see almost no international cricket and absolutely no local cricket - there is therefore little following of the higher level of the game. The middle classes, however, have cable television, and are therefore able to follow the game - and there is therefore a following amongst them. I bet that if the SABC gave cricket the sort of coverage that soccer enjoys, there would be more black cricket players than CSA would know what to do with. As it is cricket is dying in South Africa under CSA. Stadiums are empty. No one even knows who the local players are.

  • on October 2, 2013, 20:05 GMT

    Until there is equality in South African society there will be no equality on it's sports fields. There is a similar disproportionate split in many top level sports here in England, based not on race or colour but on those who attended state and private schools. Both issues are based on the "haves" succeeding and the "have nots" failing to make it to the very top level. It's about wealth, not colour.

  • on October 2, 2013, 19:57 GMT

    This is a very dangerous thing S Africa are proposing for domestic cricket. Regardless of the racial history. As a mixed race individual myself with British/Caribbean links, its strange to see in S Africa culture differentiate a Ntini/Tstosobe as a different type of players as Philander/Duminy.

    These kind of decision which will mean certain talented players will be overlooked & it could potentially prevent S Africa from building the kind dominance across all formats that previous windies & Australia teams.

    We already see how forced selections is preventing S Africa ODI/T20 teams from being as good as the test team whose players (Amla, Peterson, Philander, Tahir, Duminy) are picked on merit.

  • Behind_the_bowlers_arm on October 2, 2013, 19:51 GMT

    Favouring people because of the colour of their skin .... didn't SA have a system like that before? And were removed from international cricket in 1970 because of it.

  • OhhhhhMattyMatty on October 2, 2013, 19:26 GMT

    No wonder England will eventually rule world cricket. One injury to Steyn and SA cricket is in turmoil!

  • SurlyCynic on October 2, 2013, 19:24 GMT

    Instead of quoting overall population ratios (eg: 80% of the population is black african), surely a more relevant stat is the % of the cricket playing population? When I drive around my area I usually see groups of white or asian children playing cricket, and groups of black african children playing football. Is it any wonder that the national teams for cricket and football reflect these preferences?

    If there is to be a quota then it is better at provincial level, as the national team should always be the best 11, but sometimes this isn't a good thing for the players themselves as they don't want to be labeled as 'quota players'. Wouldn't the best approach be for CSA to financially support promising youngsters after the age of 19 (until they make first class level) so they aren't lost to the system?

  • GrindAR on October 2, 2013, 19:14 GMT

    Quota system help establishing discriminated segment of people. It should be used majorly to get funding to nurture the skills of players the quota serves for. Ntini is inspiration for many. Hope he help filling in the gaps by dedicating his time.

    Nothing destroys the game more than discriminating against the majority segment of population.

    As it bite hard when the players cannot make it to higher levels... the way it should be observed by beneficiaries is, at some point, if they feel, that they are not upto the mark even after trying hard, they should divert their interests in other ways... Mainly their earning potential should have more than two options to fall back on... afterall... if no earnings doing something as professional... it will not be fun anymore for the individual and people around the person...

  • on October 2, 2013, 18:37 GMT

    If blacks are 80% of SA population, obviously South African majority wants to see at least some blacks are playing for their country. For me it is a welcome decision. If south Africa require blessing from their people to win any major tournament more blacks should represent south Africa.

  • blink182alex on October 2, 2013, 18:18 GMT

    Not in touch with South Africa politics, but it seems absurd to me, teams should be picked by who are the best 11 players available rather than because of a required skin colour. Can't imagine any white players sitting on the sideline being happy if they are being left out to someone inferior to them just because of this quota system. It's why South Africa lost Kevin Pietersen, maybe they will lose more players because of this.

  • on October 2, 2013, 18:17 GMT

    I think the biggest problem with quotas is that unseen one. The one even the people in charge of our cricket does not see. Mental strength. What kind of mental strength will a black player build up if he knows he's in the side because he's black, and he's been chosen over a non-black player who is better than him? What kind of mental strength will the white and coloured players have knowing that no matter how good they are they might be replaced by a black player who is not as good as them? Why has one of the strongest one day teams never won a world cup even though we have the most talented players in the world? Mental strength. So, South Africa can forget about ever winning a major tournament in the future.

  • on October 2, 2013, 18:17 GMT

    Racism is still endemic in society. SaAfrica is no different. A few well minded individuals hoping to increase quotos is not the answer. It will take a complete dismantling of the Apartheid system in Education socio,economis, and fundamental structures in South African society.

    It is such a complex issue, make facilities open to all, Elite should mean elite in performance, not Race, colour etc . Clearly the stats dont add up ,

  • cnksnk on October 2, 2013, 17:43 GMT

    Let me first confess that while I follow cricket closely I have not been to SA and hence aM not familiar of he local landscape. However being an Indian I M used to quotas in ever walk of like based on religion, caste etc. But even Indias politicians who look at every opportunity to create quotas for their personal gain, have not tried quotas insports. While sports selection has its one bias , quotas is not seen even in India. Not sure if this is the best way to grow and nurture talent

  • Cpt.Meanster on October 2, 2013, 17:42 GMT

    Why do we need a quota system for blacks ? I know they are the majority but in sport, it all comes down to skills and genuine talent. If the black players possess that, by all means they should play for their country. Otherwise, there is no need to force it upon the South African system which is going to clearly cost them in the long run. No wonder KP left SA when he did. Look where that has got him today.

  • Cpt.Meanster on October 2, 2013, 17:42 GMT

    Why do we need a quota system for blacks ? I know they are the majority but in sport, it all comes down to skills and genuine talent. If the black players possess that, by all means they should play for their country. Otherwise, there is no need to force it upon the South African system which is going to clearly cost them in the long run. No wonder KP left SA when he did. Look where that has got him today.

  • cnksnk on October 2, 2013, 17:43 GMT

    Let me first confess that while I follow cricket closely I have not been to SA and hence aM not familiar of he local landscape. However being an Indian I M used to quotas in ever walk of like based on religion, caste etc. But even Indias politicians who look at every opportunity to create quotas for their personal gain, have not tried quotas insports. While sports selection has its one bias , quotas is not seen even in India. Not sure if this is the best way to grow and nurture talent

  • on October 2, 2013, 18:17 GMT

    Racism is still endemic in society. SaAfrica is no different. A few well minded individuals hoping to increase quotos is not the answer. It will take a complete dismantling of the Apartheid system in Education socio,economis, and fundamental structures in South African society.

    It is such a complex issue, make facilities open to all, Elite should mean elite in performance, not Race, colour etc . Clearly the stats dont add up ,

  • on October 2, 2013, 18:17 GMT

    I think the biggest problem with quotas is that unseen one. The one even the people in charge of our cricket does not see. Mental strength. What kind of mental strength will a black player build up if he knows he's in the side because he's black, and he's been chosen over a non-black player who is better than him? What kind of mental strength will the white and coloured players have knowing that no matter how good they are they might be replaced by a black player who is not as good as them? Why has one of the strongest one day teams never won a world cup even though we have the most talented players in the world? Mental strength. So, South Africa can forget about ever winning a major tournament in the future.

  • blink182alex on October 2, 2013, 18:18 GMT

    Not in touch with South Africa politics, but it seems absurd to me, teams should be picked by who are the best 11 players available rather than because of a required skin colour. Can't imagine any white players sitting on the sideline being happy if they are being left out to someone inferior to them just because of this quota system. It's why South Africa lost Kevin Pietersen, maybe they will lose more players because of this.

  • on October 2, 2013, 18:37 GMT

    If blacks are 80% of SA population, obviously South African majority wants to see at least some blacks are playing for their country. For me it is a welcome decision. If south Africa require blessing from their people to win any major tournament more blacks should represent south Africa.

  • GrindAR on October 2, 2013, 19:14 GMT

    Quota system help establishing discriminated segment of people. It should be used majorly to get funding to nurture the skills of players the quota serves for. Ntini is inspiration for many. Hope he help filling in the gaps by dedicating his time.

    Nothing destroys the game more than discriminating against the majority segment of population.

    As it bite hard when the players cannot make it to higher levels... the way it should be observed by beneficiaries is, at some point, if they feel, that they are not upto the mark even after trying hard, they should divert their interests in other ways... Mainly their earning potential should have more than two options to fall back on... afterall... if no earnings doing something as professional... it will not be fun anymore for the individual and people around the person...

  • SurlyCynic on October 2, 2013, 19:24 GMT

    Instead of quoting overall population ratios (eg: 80% of the population is black african), surely a more relevant stat is the % of the cricket playing population? When I drive around my area I usually see groups of white or asian children playing cricket, and groups of black african children playing football. Is it any wonder that the national teams for cricket and football reflect these preferences?

    If there is to be a quota then it is better at provincial level, as the national team should always be the best 11, but sometimes this isn't a good thing for the players themselves as they don't want to be labeled as 'quota players'. Wouldn't the best approach be for CSA to financially support promising youngsters after the age of 19 (until they make first class level) so they aren't lost to the system?

  • OhhhhhMattyMatty on October 2, 2013, 19:26 GMT

    No wonder England will eventually rule world cricket. One injury to Steyn and SA cricket is in turmoil!

  • Behind_the_bowlers_arm on October 2, 2013, 19:51 GMT

    Favouring people because of the colour of their skin .... didn't SA have a system like that before? And were removed from international cricket in 1970 because of it.