Stanford 20/20 exit a defeat too far February 13, 2008

Anger greets Bermuda's capitulation

Cricinfo staff

Widespread anger greeted Bermuda's humiliating exit from the Stanford 20/20. Against Guyana, they limped to a feeble 62 for 9 in their 20 overs before beating beaten by nine wickets.

The reaction at home was disgust at yet another humiliation for the national side with accusations that, unlike many of those taking part, Bermuda's preparation was almost non existent and they had only practised under lights earlier in the week. The local media was full of blunt talking about the performance.

Although the side was missing several players who were en route to the Under-19 World Cup and others chose to sit it out, there were also absentees because of suspensions resulting from continuing disciplinary problems that have blighted the team of late.

It is hard to see how the virtual collapse of the national side can be arrested in time for them to be serious contenders come the ICC World Cup Qualifier in a year's time. Other leading Associates believe that Bermuda have almost no chance of making the top six at that event and privately express views that they are probably not even in the top ten Associates as things stand. Failure in the Qualifier would lead to Bermuda losing their ODI status as well as being cast into the Associate wilderness.

If anyone doubted how serious things have become, on Tuesday the U-19 side, who have been held up as the best hope for the future, were thrashed by Nepal in a World Cup warm-up. In reply to Nepal's 256 for 8, Bermuda managed only 68 in 24.1 overs. One fears for them when they meet the big boys.

While the senior players have been lambasted for a string of poor performances, many believe that it is time BCB chairman Reggie Pearman stood down. He has overseen two years of steep decline and has little to show for massive government subsidies as well as considerable ICC and Stanford funding. To the national shame, the country is still unable to play home internationals as there is not a pitch deemed suitable to host such matches.

There must also be questions asked about the future of Gus Logie, the coach. While he has battled against player apathy and often seems to be left alone to fight battles where he needs board backing, he has failed to galvanise the side and perhaps he too needs to move on. The constant problems with the fitness of the players, which has become something of an embarrassment, surely must be his responsibility even if he is not given the tools to enable him to do his job properly.