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South Africa-Ireland ODI first to feature new DRS

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'DRS without LBW could work' - Thakur (2:13)

BCCI President Anurag Thakur concedes that the BCCI could work with a DRS process without the ball-tracking software (2:13)

The one-day international between South Africa and Ireland will be the first match to feature the new DRS protocols, which is likely to lead to more lbw decisions being given.

The amended DRS relates to bringing more of the stumps into play with regard to overturning an umpire's call of not out for lbws.

For a not-out decision to be overturned, more than half the ball now has to be impacting the pad within a zone bordered by the outside of off and leg stumps (formerly it was the centre of off and leg stumps), and the ball needs to be hitting the stumps within a zone bordered by the outside of off and leg stumps and the bottom of the bails (formerly the centre of off and leg stumps, and the bottom of the bails).

With DRS not being used in the India-New Zealand series, which began on Thursday, the first match to feature the new margins will be the ODI between South Africa and Ireland in Benoni on Sunday.

The annual point of introducing amended playing conditions also includes changes to the ICC's code of conduct and came into force on September 22.

Players who are sanctioned under the code of conduct will now accrue demerit points along with the current penalties that are imposed. The number of demerit points will range from one to eight depending on the level of offence the player is charged with.

These points will remain on a player's record for two years and a collection of demerit points, beginning with four, will be converted into suspension points which will determine how many matches a player will then miss.

For example, a Level 1 one breach can bring a maximum of two demerit points, so two of those within a 24-month period would bring the player to four points which equate to two suspension points which means they would miss one Test or a combination of ODIs and T20s.