Local cuisine


Meat-eater's delight

Go to Moti Mahal in Kalupur, one of Ahmedabad's oldest restaurants, which has an extensive non-vegetarian Indian menu, from kebabs to tandoori chicken and Daaba Gosht. It's a must-visit for meat eaters. It's also very cheap.

Submitted by Kamal Modi

Visit an iconic sweet shop

For those who love sweets, the 160-year-old shop of Girish Chandra Dey & Nakur Chandra Nandy is a must-visit. Here you can have most authentic Bengali sandesh for as little as Rs 10. You eat one piece and guaranteed you will want more. For people with more modern tastes, they also sell sandesh flavoured with chocolate, strawberry, blackcurrant, and a strawberry chocolate fusion.

Submitted by Navin Agarwal

Indulge in some street food  

An Indian man of ethnic Chinese descent sells momos at a roadside breakfast stall in Territi Bazaar, Kolkata, July 26, 2010 Calcutta is famous for its amazing food: tandoori, continental, Indian, all of it, but its speciality is the street food: Puchka, the Bengali version of Bombay's pani puri and Delhi's gol gappa, is a fried hollow cupcake filled with potato, grams, and spicy tamarind water. You can't miss it when in Calcutta. You have many variations of it. Puchka with dahi (yoghurt), puchka with water and puchka with sweet water. What's common to all is that they have a basic potato filling. Then there are the chaats: the jhalmuri, the hing kachori and sweets. Another street-food favourite is the biryani (rice with meat and spices), which is completely different from its other cousins, the Hyderabadi and Lucknowi biryanis. If you are a food freak, and like biryani, you cannot afford to miss the Calcutta biryani. What makes it unique is that it has potatoes as well as meat. It caters to various palettes, so to say, ranging from the extremely rich, oily ones, to the less spicy ones for the health-conscious people. Deep Dasgupta

Eat traditional sweets  

Customers look at <i>roshgolla</i> and other sweets at a counter, Kolkata, October 4, 2004 Sink your teeth into a roshogolla or a sandesh from KC Das. Made out of milk solids - the roshogolla in a sugar syrup, the sandesh its dry counterpart - they can be very, very sweet.

New Market

The Stuart Hogg Market, also known as New Market, was established in 1874, Kolkata, September 21, 2010 One of Kolkata's oldest markets is ironically called New Market. Do check it out. It is very close to Park Street, and you can buy all sorts of stuff, including leather goods. While in New Market, do try the chaat (spicy snacks) and puchkas (hollow deep-fried balls with spicy tamarind water) outside, and ask someone for directions to Badshaah which makes rolls (meat/egg/veggies in wraps) to die for!

Submitted by Aabhas

Bijoli Grill Food

Bijoli Grill Food World is a true son of the soil, serving fresh, hot fast food.

Kewpie's

Visit Kewpie's, at 2, Elgin Lane (Tel 91-33-24759880), for authentic home-style Bengali food.

Oh! Calcutta

Fresh fried prawns are served with a wedge of lime at a fisherman's cafe in the Mercado São Pedro, Brazil, August 5, 2009 Oh! Calcutta at Forum Mall has a choice of Anglo-Indian and Bengali food.

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More in Kolkata

Where to

  1. Zaranj

    At standalone Zaranj, you can sample excellent north Indian cuisine.

  2. Hotel Aston

    Hotel Aston is a good bet for business travellers (from Rs 1600).

  3. Park Street bars

    Most of the many bars dotting Park Street will offer you a tipple and a snack at prices that will not pinch.

Must Do

Eat kebabs, biryani and chinese food

Eat Chelo kebab (an Iranian dish of kebabs, grilled vegetables and buttered rice) at Peter Cat. Try the biryani at Arsalan or at Shiraz. Go to Tangra for chinese food and eat authentic Bengali cuisine at Oh! Calcutta.

Tips for Travellers

The taxi fare is calculated as two times the amount on the meter, plus Rs 2.

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