Coach has options in Sri Lanka, Australia and England April 5, 2007

Moody delays decision on next move

Cricinfo staff



Tom Moody is in demand as a coach © AFP

Tom Moody's family will influence whether he stays with Sri Lanka, heads home to Australia or returns to England to work after the World Cup. Moody has a list of potential positions to consider at the end of the tournament, including continuing his role with Mahela Jayawardene's team or coaching his former state Western Australia.

He has also been linked with the England job but that appointment depends on whether Duncan Fletcher remains in the post. "There has been speculation about this, that and the other, but at the end of the day, I haven't looked at anything," he said in the Sydney Morning Herald. "Yes, WA has contacted me and asked of my interest. I said to them that at the end of the World Cup, I will sit down with Sri Lanka and see what the future holds there, like I will with whatever opportunities may be there."

An ECB spokesman told The Australian Moody had not been approached to replace Fletcher, who has the job for "as long as he wishes". However, Fletcher's position has come under increasing pressure since England lost the Ashes and his role is expected to be reviewed once the World Cup ends.

Before the tournament Moody withdrew from the field to replace Australia's John Buchanan, a position taken by Tim Nielsen, because the timing was not right. "It was a huge privilege to be seen as a potential applicant, but I made the decision for my own personal reasons and that hasn't changed," he said. "In five years' time, or ten years' time, it may be completely different.

"I may look at it and think: 'This is the time now.' If the demand is there and the opportunity is there, it might be perfect for me, but at the moment, that job, as attractive as it is, wasn't quite right for where I am."

Moody, who played eight Tests for Australia and won two World Cups, has two young children and his wife Helen lives in England. "Location is not a huge issue but [family] will be the No. 1 priority in the decision, and where I want to be in the next three to four years," he said. "Not from the point of view of geographically, but where I want to be with regards to the family and the time I want to spend with them." A position with a state, county or Australia's Centre of Excellence would offer him more stability than a globe-trotting role with an international team.

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