First Test match

India v England 1933-34

Toss: India. Test debuts: India - L.Amarnath, L.P.Jai, R.J.D.Jamshedji, V.M.Merchant, L.Ramji; England - A.Mitchell, B.H.Valentine.

Victory for England by nine wickets was the result of the first Test soon after lunch on the fourth day. Nichols and Valentine stood out conspicuously in a satisfactory performance. The Essex fast bowler worked with unflagging zeal in the great heat and did specially, good service when India had pulled the game round to some extent. By catching Amar Nath close to the ground at fine leg Nichols ended the one big batting display for India. As he held two other catches and took eight wickets for 108 he had a large share in twice dismissing India for 39 more than England scored in one innings. Clark, despite an injury to his left hand, Verity and Langridge all bowled well and England fielded admirably. Walters had some luck as also did Valentine, who going in fourth wicket down at 164 played brilliant cricket. He and Jardine put on 130 before stumps were drawn but the England captain left early in the morning when 15 more runs had come. Jardine did not make a mistake in his most valuable innings; he showed his usual sound form in defence and in placing the ball. Valentine increased his overnight 79 by 57 before mistiming a drive. He got his 136 runs in less than three hours and hit a 6 and twelve 4's. Nissar bowled much the best for India; keeping up a good pace he sent Jardine's off stump flying with a specially fast ball. He and the other bowlers were not sure of the fieldsmen, but there was nothing better in the match than the catch made by Jamshedi, the slow bowler, in dismissing Townsend, a very hard return being held beautifully.

When India batted a second time, facing as arrears their first innings total, two smart catches from snicks off Clark suggested a collapse but Amar Nath and his captain raised the total from 17 to 59 by extremely good cricket. A bruised hand troubled Nayudu, who was slow compared to the rapid scoring of his partner. Amar Nath reached 102 before stumps were drawn and seemed set again in the morning when Nichols brought off his wonderful catch. At the wickets altogether three hours and a half Nath hit twenty-one 4's in his 118 - a particularly fine effort for a first appearance against England. He and Nayuduput on 186 - the largest partnership in the match - but the remaining seven wickets went down for 55 runs, Nichols being mainly responsible for England having such a light task to accomplish. It is noteworthy that in the two innings of India, while six men were leg before, Verity was the one bowler to hit the stumps; and of his two successes earned in this way one came on the first the other on the last day.

© John Wisden & Co