Obituary

Vallance Jupp

JUPP, MR. VALLANCE WILLIAM CRISP, who collapsed and died in the garden of his home on July 9, aged 69, was one of the rare cricketers who began as a professional and later became an amateur. A splendid all-rounder, who played eight times for England, he was one of the best players in the country between the two World Wars. Born at Burgess Hill, Sussex on March 27, 1891, Jupp was educated privately and later went to St. John's School, Burgess Hill, where he became captain of the eleven. In his last year there he averaged over 100 with the bat and his achievements attracted the attention of the county authorities. He started with Sussex as a professional and made steady progress. In 1914 he played an innings of 217 not out against Worcestershire at Worcester and averaged over 36 for the season. With 51 wickets, he headed the county bowling averages that year.

During the War Jupp served with the Royal Engineers before being transferred as a cadet to the R.A.F. On demobilisation in 1919 he appeared for Sussex as an amateur and quickly showed that the absence of four years from the game had not reduced his skill. In 1921 he scored 2,169 runs in first-class matches and took 121 wickets.

At the end of the 1920 season he was invited to tour Australia with the M.C.C. but could not accept. Two years later he went to South Africa under the captaincy of F. T. Mann. His Test appearances were against Australia twice, in 1921, against South Africa, four times on the 1922-23 tour, and against West Indies, twice, in 1928. At the end of 1921 he accepted the position of secretary with Northamptonshire and then qualified for the county, giving them valuable service as captain and player until he retired in 1939. He decided to give up the captaincy in 1931, having taken that course twice previously, only to be pressed into service again.

As a batsman, Jupp could vary his style to suit the occasion. He watched the ball with extreme care and was able to play a rigidly defensive game, but on true, fast pitches he scored with easy freedom, being strong in driving. Before the 1914 War and for a time afterwards he bowled slightly above medium-pace, but later he turned to off-spin and few bowlers of his day were able to turn the ball to the same extent. Again, as a bowler, he showed himself adept at varying his methods, depending on the condition of the pitch. He was also a first-class fieldsman, especially at cover.

In his career he scored just over 23,000 runs for an average of almost 30 and he took more than 1,600 wickets for about 23 runs apiece. Ten times he achieved the "double" and in 1932 he took all ten wickets in an innings against Kent at Tunbridge Wells. Jupp performed the hat-trick five times, three for Sussex and two for Northamptonshire. His best season with the ball was in 1928 when he took 166 wickets, average 20.15.

© John Wisden & Co