The Hon. Frederick Calthorpe

CALTHROPE, THE HON. FREDERICK SOMERSET GOUGH, Cambridge Blue and Warwickshire captain, died on November 19 aged 43 after about a month's illness from which recovery was impossible. Born on May 27, 1892, he was one of the best all-round players of his time at Repton, being described in 1911 as the backbone of a strong side's bowling. Going up to Jesus College, Cambridge, he obtained his Blue as a Freshman and remained in the side for the following two seasons. During the War he served in the Royal Air Force and would have captained Cambridge in 1919 had not the letter of invitation miscarried. As it was, he played under J. S. F. Morrison in his fourth University match which Oxford won by 45 runs. The game revived the best traditions of cricket at Lord's which during the preceding four summers had been given over in various ways to the amelioration of War service.

Before the War Calthorpe appeared a few times for Sussex, but in 1919 threw in his lot with Warwickshire and next year he became captain, a position he held until 1929. Always an enthusiastic cricketer, Calthorpe reached his best in 1925 when he scored 1,404 runs for Warwickshire with an average of 34.24 and took 44 wickets. His all-round form gained him a place in the Gentlemen's team at Lord's. A most attractive batsman, who went out to the half volley or cut the short ball in true Repton style, Calthorpe usually scored freely. As a medium-paced right hand bowler, he had a peculiar corkscrew run and his swerve with the new ball often worried batsmen. One of his best performances with the ball was in 1914 when in Oxford's second innings he took five wickets for 43 runs. In 1920, when most successful as a bowler, he took 100 wickets in all matches and scored 1025 runs. Another notable bowling feat by Calthorpe occurred at Edgbaston in 1922 when he and Howell put out Hampshire for 15. Calthorpe took four wickets for four runs in that sensational game which Hampshire won by 155 runs. He toured New Zealand and Australia in the winter of 1922 with the M.C.C. team, captained by A. C. MacLaren, and he went out to the West Indies in charge of M.C.C. teams in 1925 and 1929. Calthorpe had a lot to do with starting the Folkestone Cricket Festival. He enjoyed every minute of a game whether batting, bowling or fielding. Taking the joy of the cricket field to the golf links he became a scratch player with the Worplesdon Club, founded the Cricketers' Golf Society, and gave a cup for competition. Son of Lord Calthorpe he was heir to the title.

© John Wisden & Co