1943

Obituaries during the war, 1942

ADAMS, SUB-LIEUT. (A.) G. J., R.N.V.R., was killed in July while on active service, aged 22. He had the unusual experience of playing in five seasons, 1934 to 1938, for his school, Bishop's Stortford, and three times he headed the batting averages. Captain in his last year, he averaged 32.54, but enjoyed his best year in 1937, when he scored 602 runs, including three centuries, the highest being 112 not out, and averaged 60.20. This form took him into The Rest XI, but he failed at Lord's. In 1936 he averaged 45.70, best score 106 not out. Adams also could bowl, and he fielded with great dash at cover-point--a characteristic that helped to make him a good captain. After leaving school he played a little for Hertfordshire.

In an appreciation of Adams, Mr. H. L. Price, Headmaster of Bishop's Stortford College, wrote:--

After the war started Adams joined the Navy; he transferred to the Fleet Air Arm, did his flying training in the U.S.A., and became a Sub-Lieutenant. He returned to this country to complete his training on an aircraft carrier. He showed considerable promise as a Rugger scrum-half. I thought his best innings at school was the century he made against the M.C.C. in 1937; he had some good bowling against him, he showed beautiful stroke play, and I think his innings was chanceless. Only a few days before his death he was married to Miss Joy Dorrington, the sister of another Old Stortfordian. He is a great loss; he was a splendid fellow. I am so glad that he came down to see us before he left to join his ship.

ARKWRIGHT, LIEUTENANT COLONEL FRANCIS GODFREY BERTRAM, M. C., whose death, fighting in Libya, was announced early in August, played for Eton in 1922 and 1923. His one big performance came in his second year in the eleven, when he hit 175 against Winchester. He and E. W. Dawson, afterwards captain of Cambridge University and Leicestershire, put on 301 for the second wicket--a record for an Eton v. Winchester match. Dawson was run out, and the next best score for Eton was 33 in a total of 433. This performance showed Arkwright as a brilliant stylish batsman with his fine physique used in front of the wicket forcing strokes, besides the powerful drive. Curiously enough, all four inter-school bit matches in which Frank Arkwright took part were drawn. He headed the Eton averages with 52.44 in 1923, and, scoring a good 54, he helped Lord's Schools beat The Rest by nine wickets. He played a little for Hampshire that season, and, going to Sandhurst, showed good form for R.M.A. Service abroad with 12th Lancers limited his opportunities for cricket in England, but abroad he continued to do well, and when home on leave sometimes turned out for The Army XI.

ASHTON ACTING SQUADRON LEADER CLAUDE THESIGER, the triple Cambridge Blue and England Association football international, was killed on active service on October 31 in a disaster which also caused the death of Squadron Leader R. de W. K. Winlaw, another Old Wykehamist and double Light Blue.

The youngest of three sons of Mr. H. S. Ashton, President of the Essex County Club from 1936, who in turn captained Cambridge cricket elevens and were together in the 1921 team, Claude became the best known. By a strange change of fortune Gilbert and Hubert each led his side to victory over Oxford by an innings, but Claude experienced extreme ill-luck in 1923. Oxford batted all the first day, and during the night a severe thunderstorm with a deluge of rain completely altered the conditions at Lord's, with the result that Cambridge were dismissed twice and beaten on the Tuesday by an innings and 227 runs, the most overwhelming defeat in the whole series of University matches and the three most decisive results to occur consecutively. In this exasperating engagement Claude Ashton, with 15, alone got double figures in the first innings of 59, while in the follow-on his 21 came next best to G. O. Allens's 28. G. T. S. Stevens and R. H. B. Bettington, the Australian Oxford captain, in turn found the drying turf exactly suited to their spin bowling. So, after two great victories under his brothers, Claude Ashton finished his University career in dismal circumstances. This was all the more regrettable because for Cambridge that season he scored 678 runs, average 28.25, and took 30 wickets. In 1921 he made 557 runs, average 46.41, with 98 against M.C.C. at Lord's and 101 not out off the Surrey bowlers at the Oval as his best scores. His 48 against Oxford showed his form on the big occasion; next year, when rain interfered with many matches, his aggregate fell to 285, average 20.25, and he did not bat against Oxford, his brother Hubert, with his own score 90, declaring at 403 for four wickets, though less consideration for his side's prospect of victory would have allowed him the opportunity to make a second century in successive matches and so establish a record which fell to H. J. Enthoven in 1924 and 1925, only to be surpassed by A. T. Ratcliffe seven years later.

At Winchester, Claude Ashton was captain of cricket, football, racquets and fives. His best score against Harrow was 92 in 1918 and against Eton 49 in 1920. Business prevented him from giving much time to County cricket, but he played some superb innings for Essex, notably in 1934. In an astonishing match at Brentwood with Kent, who scored 803 for four wickets--Ashdown putting together the Kent record of 332-- Claude Ashton, not out 71, showed that he retained his batting form. What a return to the Essex team after five years absence from county cricket--fielding out 803 runs--but two of the wickets fell to him at a cost of 185 runs. Following immediately on this he made 118 against Surrey at Brentwood, helping O'Connor put on 287 for the fifth wicket, an Essex record, in a total of 570, which brought victory by an innings and 192. The stand occupied only two hours twenty minutes, and the fourth hundred of the innings came in 38 minutes. In those first two County Championship matches at Brentwood 2,362 runs were scored and the results were identical, Essex winning by the same margin by which they lost to Kent. In six games for Essex Claude Ashton scored 416 runs that season and headed the averages with 59.42. Altogether in first-class cricket from 1921 to 1938 he was credited with an aggregate of about 5,000 runs at an average of 25, took 139 wickets with his medium-pace bowling, and held 117 catches--he always fielded brilliantly.

Claude Ashton gained perhaps higher fame at Association football than at cricket. He could not lead his side against Oxford when captain at Cambridge in his third year in the eleven, but was a grand player, and for Corinthians in Cup ties he occupied every position in the forward and half-back lines. He also appeared at full-back and kept goal for The Casuals. A prominent figure in many matches he went through some terrific Cup-tie struggles against the best professional teams, and he earned international honours as centre-forward in October 1925 against Ireland at Belfast, where he captained England. He played in thirteen amateur internationals.

For Cambridge he twice played hockey against Oxford. The three brothers occupied the inside-forward positions for Old Wykehamists in Arthur Dunn Cup ties. Born on February 19, 1901, Claude Ashton died at the age of 41, leaving a widow and three children.

BARKER, LIEUT. CLIFFORD M., killed in Libya in August, showed promising all-round form in the Transvaal Currie Cup team, 1937-38.

BARNARDO, LIEUT. FREEMAN FREDERICK THOMAS, of the Queen's Bays, was killed in action in the Middle East in October. A good batsman, he was twice in the Eton XI, and scored 62 not out at Lord's in 1937, when Harrow declared, setting the sporting chance of making 159 on a rain-affected pitch in 110 minutes. Good fielding stopped many hits, but Barnardo used the drive with such effect that the runs were knocked off quarter of an hour from the end of extra time, and Eton won by seven wickets, J. P. Mann getting 32 of the last 54 runs, which came very quickly. His Eton average was 27.71 in 1936, and 37.63 next year. He made 74 in the 1938 Cambridge Freshmen's match and 76 in the next season's Senior's match, following this with 74 for Etceteras, and doing still better against Yorkshire, his 75 coming in a second innings total of 369; but that was his last appearance for the University.

BARRELL, L/A/C JOHN MCLAREN, was killed when flying in August. After leaving Aldenham School he played for Northern C.C. with such capacity for leadership and organisation that, when captain in 1939, his team rose from bottom place to second in the Liverpool competition. A very good bat, he headed the averages in 1938 with an aggregate of over 700. Altogether he played ten years for the Northern Club, and in 1939 he averaged nearly 21 for Lancashire Second XI, which he captained several times. He was a brilliant fieldsman. Good at all games, he held the title of Lancashire Squash champion and played Association football for Corinthians, Liverpool Ramblers, Northern Nomads, and Rugby football for Waterloo.

BELL, LIEUT. L. CLARKE, one of the most prominent Canadian cricketers, fell during the Dieppe raid on August 19, within three days of completing his 32nd year. At Ridley College and for the Toronto Club he excelled as a left-handed batsman, and, coming to England in 1936 with the team that lost only once in a programme of fifteen matches, he headed the averages with 45.11. Strangely enough, when the Canadians beat M.C.C. at Lord's by 76 runs, Clarke Bell failed. His highest score, 106 not out, was made at Chatham against Royal Engineers.

BERKELEY-HILL, P/O O. W. H., killed in operations against the enemy in July, aged 20, was captain of cricket, hockey and squash racquets, besides being in the Rugby football team, at Hurstpierpoint college. A good bat, he averaged 23.63 in 1939, but was less successful next season when he captained the eleven. Two days after leaving school he joined the R.A.F., received his commission as a fighter pilot in 1941, and lost his life after being posted to Malta.

BEVAN, LIEUT.-COL. THOMAS, of the Coldstream Guards, died in June of wounds received while fighting in the Middle East. Aged 42, he was at Eton during the previous great war and in 1918 averaged 21.83. Of two one-day matches with Harrow, Bevan played only in the first, scoring 25 at Harrow, where Eton won by 56 runs. His steadiness would have been valuable in the return, which Harrow, with a total of 98, won by seven runs on Agar's Plough; this first victory of Harrow over Eton since 1908 is not placed in the regular engagements between the two schools at Lord's. Harrow did not win again until 1939.

CANTLEY, LIEUT. J. A., Durham L. I., killed in the Middle East in November, was in the Haileybury eleven of 1936. A left-hand bowler, he took 21 wickets at 14.76 each. He could bat, though usually going in late, and often gave useful help in an emergency.

CLARKE, CAPTAIN E. GREVILLE, 10th Hussars, killed in action in the Middle East in September, aged 29, was in the Rugby cricket XI of 1931, when he averaged 18.60. In 1932, as an opening batsman, he averaged 25.23. He also played in the Rugby XV and the Hockey XI. While at Cambridge he devoted himself chiefly to hockey for recreation, gaining his Blue and afterwards playing for Wales.

CLOETE, CAPTAIN PETER HENRY BAIRNSFATHER, a good slow bowler, who played for Western Province from 1936 to 1940, was killed in an air disaster on December 19, aged 25. His original name was Bairnsfather, but he adopted the surname Cloete in 1938 for family reasons.

COLMAN, MR. DAVID WYNDHAM JAMES, 2nd Lieut. King's Royal Rifles, was killed on November 5 in the Middle East. After doing fairly well for Eton in 1939, the year when Harrow gained their first victory at Lord's since 1908, he captained the side next season without knowing defeat, and crowned his successful leadership by scoring 92 at Harrow, so contributing largely to a one-wicket victory. His father, Mr. G. R. R. Colman, played for Eton and Oxford in 1913-14. He died in 1935 from effect of war wounds.

CRUICKSHANKS, WING COMMANDER GEORGE LAWRENCE, a South African, who was killed in action, played for Eastern Province in two Currie Cup matches at Johannesburg before joining the R.A.F. A powerful left-handed batsman and sound wicket-keeper, he played for All Egypt when stationed in the East against H. M. Martineau's XI in 1936 and the two following years. His best scores were 62 and 59; while at Lord's in 1939 he made the highest score in each innings for R.A.F. against the Royal Navy-- run out 90 and 70 not out. He was posthumously awarded the D.F.C.

DANIEL, CAPTAIN MARTIN CHARLES CAMPBELL, R.A.S.C., died on September 24, aged 37. A member of the Rugby School XI, 1920 to 1922, he went to Oxford, playing for New College and Authentics. He subsequently joined Band of Brothers, I. Zingari, Free Foresters and Butterflies, for whom he managed the September East Kent tours for several years. A left-hand bowler, free bat and splendid fielder, especially at mid-off, he was captain of Broadstairs club, which met with much success, thanks mainly to his enthusiasm and energy. He was also a member of the Kent County Club Committee. In December 1940 he went overseas, serving in Crete, Syria and Palestine, but after promotion to Staff Captain at Cairo he was invalided home and died in London.

DE ROUGEMONT, RICHARD CHRISTOPHER IRVING, who died of wounds when serving with the Brigade of Guards in North Africa in December, played for Eton in 1937 and 1938 without doing anything exceptional, his best innings being 62 not out against Charterhouse in 1937 when Eton were in danger of defeat. He was the younger son of Brig.-General de Rougemont.

DOYLE, PRIVATE CONNIE, who played for Orange Free State in the Currie Cup Competition, 1937-38, died of wounds in Egypt on October 24, aged 29.

FREAKES, FLYING-OFFICER HUBERT DAINTON, who died on service in March, made a name at many sports at Oxford University. A very good bat when at school, he represented Rhodes University and Grahamstown, South Africa, at cricket, but, though tried in Freshmen's and Seniors' matches, he did not get his cricket Blue. In fact, after playing in Currie Cup cricket when only eighteen and scoring 122 not out when first tried, he scarcely showed his best form in English cricket, but excelled at Rugby football. He succeeded H. G. Owen-Smith as Oxford full-back in 1936, but then played centre-three-quarter, helping conspicuously in a surprise victory over Cambridge. When Freakes was captain in 1938, Oxford lost a hard fight by two odd points. He gained three caps for England. A fine athlete, especially at jumping and swimming, he also showed to advantage at golf and billiards.

HART-DAVIS, PRIVATE GEOFFERY C., died of wounds received in Libya in January. He kept wicket for Natal in two matches against the M.C.C. team that toured South Africa in 1927-28.

HUMAN, CAPTAIN ROGER H. C., Adjutant Oxford and Bucks L.L, died on active service in November, aged 33. Very good in games at Repton, he gained cricket and Association football Blues at Cambridge. Captain of Repton in 1928, when he averaged 37.27 as a free batsman and took 32 wickets at 19.62 each with medium-paced bowling, he looked like becoming a great all-rounder, but failed to maintain this form. A late choice for Cambridge in 1930, he did little towards beating Oxford, who threw the match away by bad fielding and poor batting. Next year, when Oxford, winning by eight wickets, gained their first victory over Cambridge since 1923, Human again failed, and generally he proved disappointing in University cricket but always fielded well. At different times he played for Berkshire, Oxfordshire, and Worcestershire when a master at Bromsgrove School. Altogether in first-class cricket he was credited with 1,869 runs, average 24.92, and 48 wickets at 37.87 each.

KENT, AIR COMMODORE, H.R.H. DUKE OF, K.G., K.T., G.C.M.G., G.C.V.O., life honorary member of Marylebone Cricket Club, was killed in an air accident on August 25, when the Sunderland flying boat which he was in crashed on a hill 1,000 feet high in the North of Scotland. Thirteen other R.A.F. personnel also lost their lives, only one member of the crew surviving.

KIDSON, PILOT OFFICER M. W. T., R.A.F., who played two seasons in the Lancing College XI, was killed in action over Malta in August. He showed great promise in 1938, when he averaged nearly 26, but did not maintain this form.

LANGTON, FLIGHT-LIEUT. ARTHUR BEAUMONT CHUDLEIGH, killed on active service in November, aged 30, was a member of the team which in 1935 gained the first triumph for South Africa in England, their victory by 157 runs at Lord's being the only definite result in the rubber. In that match he took six wickets for 89--four for 31 in England's second innings, after helping Bruce Mitchell (164 not out) add 101 in two hours. This stand enabled H. F. Wade to apply the closure when Langton returned a catch to W. R. Hammond. The wonderful bowling of X. Balaskas contributed perhaps more than anything else to that success, but in the five Tests, Langton, with fifteen wickets, came second to C. L. Vincent in effectiveness, while his batting average of 30.25 showed his all-round value. In the whole tour he excelled among the bowlers with 115 wickets at 21.16 each, and scored 537 runs--average 21.48. He played his highest innings of the tour, 73 not out, at the Oval, where he and E. L. Dalton, 117, added 137 in seventy minutes, a ninth wicket record for matches between England and South Africa. Such valuable batting late in the innings was characteristic of Langton, and he concluded the tour at Scarborough by making 20 and 68 when runs were wanted badly, so helping to remove fear of defeat from H. D. G. Leveson-Gower's powerful side in a very keen match.

The youngest member of the team of fifteen players who came over, Langton also was the tallest, and he made the most of his six feet three inches by bringing the ball well over at good medium pace. Accurate in length, with late swerve and spin, if the pitch helped, he did not require the new ball to trouble batsmen, but could go on at any time, and always needed careful watching for lift, break or change of speed. With the bat he showed ability in defence, but was at his best when forcing the game with pulls, drives and cuts. He was a worthy member of a fine fielding side, and altogether proved himself a most capable all-round cricketer.

Immediately after this tour he played in all five Tests when Australia first sent a team direct to South Africa. Like many of his colleagues, Langton seemed as if suffering from the effects of the heavy work in England. The Australians went through sixteen matches without defeat and won four of the Tests, the other being cut short by rain. Langton made 45 and 20, and twice took four wickets in an innings for Transvaal, but could not find his form in the Tests; his 12 wickets--most for South Africa--cost 44.33 runs apiece, and his batting average fell to 6.88. Against England's successful team captained by W. R. Hammond in 1938-39, Langton went through another trying experience without adequate reward. His 13 Test wickets cost 51 runs apiece, and seven innings brought him only 115 runs, while in the final match, which remained unfinished after ten days, he bowled 91 overs for 203 runs and four wickets.

Langton first earned notice in March 1931, when, after coaching by Wainwright, the old Yorkshire professional, he played for the Public Schools XV against the England team captained by A. P. F. Chapman. In 1934 he appeared for Transvaal in the Currie Cup competition, and so graduated to the highest class cricket. Born on March 2, 1912, Arthur Langton passed away in the pride of manhood; his name will live in South African cricket history.

runs were wanted badly, so helping to remove fear of defeat from H. D. G. Leveson-Gower's powerful side in a very keen match.

The youngest member of the team of fifteen players who came over, Langton also was the tallest, and he made the most of his six feet three inches by bringing the ball well over at good medium pace. Accurate in length, with late swerve and spin, if the pitch helped, he did not require the new ball to trouble batsmen, but could go on at any time, and always needed careful watching for lift, break or change of speed. With the bat he showed ability in defence, but was at his best when forcing the game with pulls, drives and cuts. He was a worthy member of a fine fielding side, and altogether proved himself a most capable all-round cricketer.

Immediately after this tour he played in all five Tests when Australia first sent a team direct to South Africa. Like many of his colleagues, Langton seemed as if suffering from the effects of the heavy work in England. The Australians went through sixteen matches without defeat and won four of the Tests, the other being cut short by rain. Langton made 45 and 20, and twice took four wickets in an innings for Transvaal, but could not find his form in the Tests; his 12 wickets--most for South Africa--cost 44.33 runs apiece, and his batting average fell to 6.88. Against England's successful team captained by W. R. Hammond in 1938-39, Langton went through another trying experience without adequate reward. His 13 Test wickets cost 51 runs apiece, and seven innings brought him only 115 runs, while in the final match, which remained unfinished after ten days, he bowled 91 overs for 203 runs and four wickets.

Langton first earned notice in March 1931, when, after coaching by Wainwright, the old Yorkshire professional, he played for the Public Schools XV against the England team captained by A. P. F. Chapman. In 1934 he appeared for Transvaal in the Currie Cup competition, and so graduated to the highest class cricket. Born on March 2, 1912, Arthur Langton passed away in the pride of manhood; his name will live in South African cricket history.

LYLE, CAPTAIN IAN ARCHIBALD DE HOGHTON, Of the Black Watch, died on active service in November. Very good at all games, he took part in a remarkable match at Lord's in 1928, when Eton, 108 behind on the first innings and losing two men in the second for 7 runs, beat Harrow after a very exciting finish. I. Akers Douglas, 158, and E. R. Sheepshanks, by adding 149 turned the fortune of the game, and Lyle helped with 69, runs coming at a hundred an hour until Sheepshanks declared. Harrow wanted 308 for victory in three hours and a half. So well did they travel in the race with the clock that success seemed possible, but the last four wickets fell for 38 runs, and Eton won at quarter past seven by 28 runs amidst tremendous enthusiasm. Lyle averaged 33.28 for the season. He took part in the 1929 Freshmen's match at Oxford, but was then devoted to golf, playing against Cambridge in 1931 and 1932. He also represented the University at squash racquets and Eton Fives.

MCMILLAN, 2ND LIEUTENANT N. W., who played for Auckland in the Plunket Shield competition, was killed in the Middle East.

MONTEATH, 2ND LIEUTENANT A. P., an Otago player in Plunket Shield matches, was killed in the Middle East.

PRICE, A.B. SEAMAN DAVID, reported missing, presumed killed, after an action at sea on July 6, played regularly for Western Province teams from 1934 to 1940. A useful spin bowler, he also fielded with dash and certainty.

ROBERTSON, LIEUT. JOHN MOIR, Gordon Highlanders, was killed in Egypt in October. A fine forcing batsman, he played for Aberdeenshire for sixteen years. After first appearing in the county team when only 15 years of age, he finished as captain during his last three seasons. He made many runs for the county and was chosen frequently for Scottish representative elevens. A very good fieldsman, especially on the leg side near the wicket, he brought off many remarkable catches.

SMITH. CAPT. FREDERICK EDWARD, N.Z.R.A., who died of wounds received in the Middle East, captained the Waitaki eleven, besides being New Zealand University champion from 100 yards to quarter mile and a good Rugby football player. Son of parents living at East Molesey, he came back to England in 1936 when 21 years of age, and met with great success at cricket for the East Molesey Club. In two consecutive seasons he scored 1,000 runs and took 100 wickets, in the course of which splendid bowling he dismissed all ten opponents in an innings and did the hat-trick.

SOUTER, CAPTAIN IAN MATHESON, reported in October killed on active service in India, was educated at Haileybury, for whom he played cricket in 1939. He enlisted in the Bedfordshire and Hertfordshire Regiment that autumn, and was selected for admission to an Indian O.C.T.U. Gazetted to the 10th Baluchi Regiment in the autumn of 1941, he died when in charge of the transport company.

TINDALL, CAPTAIN RICHARD GEOFFREY, killed in Libya on January 29, when nearly 30 years of age, stood out as a splendid player of games, especially cricket and Association football, for which he gained Blues at Oxford. His play at Winchester promised this success, as in 1930 he surpassed all his colleagues by scoring 68 and 55 not out against Eton without saving his side, who lost by seven wickets. Going up to Trinity College, Oxford, he obtained his Blue as a Senior in 1933, and developed fast bowling so well that he took 26 wickets for the University besides scoring 374 runs with an average of 22. Next season he showed to equal advantage with 24 wickets and a batting average of 23.60. He did little in two drawn matches with Cambridge at Lord's, but, starting to play for Dorset in 1932, he became a prominent all-rounder in second-class county cricket. The best bowler for Dorset in 1933 with 35 wickets at less than 16 runs each, Tindall next year headed the batting averages with 39.25 and took most wickets--39 at an average of 18.61. A consistent, steady batsman, with plenty of strokes, he seldom failed. A dashing full-back, he was in the Oxford Association eleven that beat Cambridge at Stamford Bridge in 1933 by three goals to none. He also played golf well. On leaving Oxford he was appointed a master at Eton, where enthusiasm for the field game, besides other sports, helped to make him a valuable coach. A captain in the O.T.C., Tindall was gazetted to the 60th Rifles in April 1940, and in the Army he developed the characteristics that produced his excellence at all sports.

WALKER, FLIGHT-LIEUTENANT DAVID FRANK, Oxford University captain in 1935 and the most successful batsman who ever played for Norfolk, lost his life during operational duties in February, and was buried at Trondheim, Norway. He played three seasons in the Uppingham XI, 1930 to 1932. Only one match was lost when he was captain in his last two years. By far the best bat, he headed the averages each season, and made 224 not out against Shrewsbury in 1932, the next best score being 39, and he averaged 78. Twice he played for The Rest against Lord's Schools. Going up to Oxford, he started his University career in such fine form that he made a hundred (retired) in the Freshmen's match, and, after 67 against Yorkshire, he carried his bat through the innings against Gloucestershire, scoring 107 not out. His first five innings in The Parks produced 394 runs for three times out. At Lord's, on a rain-damaged pitch against Kenneth Farnes, Jahangar Khan, R. S. Grant and H. J. Human, he held out for two hours and forty minutes, scoring 46 before being sixth out at 117. In this typical display under adverse conditions he showed admirable defence, and he accomplished nothing better for Oxford. He finished his University career captain of the losing side at Lord's, after taking part in two drawn games with Cambridge. He also played hockey for Oxford.

David Walker found greater opportunities for showing his batting ability when appearing for Norfolk, and developed from a patient defender into a brilliant exponent of many strokes. When a schoolboy in 1931 he stayed in four hours against Kent Second XI, and his 73 not out was the best score for Norfolk that season. Altogether in nine seasons for Norfolk he obtained 4,034 runs with an average of 62, and hit thirteen centuries, the highest being 217 against Northumberland in 1939. He invariably began each season for Norfolk in splendid form: in 1933 with 179, 71 and 139: in 1934 with 157, 190 and 95, while in 1938 he played consecutive innings of 57, 101 not out, 167, 7, 65. 27 not out and 158. In 1933, when Norfolk finished head of the second-class counties and the challenge match was cancelled because Yorkshire Second XI, the winners, were found to have an inferior record to Wiltshire's, David Walker averaged 85.22 in all games for the county. This figure he surpassed next year with 93. Seven times he headed the Norfolk averages, and in three seasons he was the best batsman in the Second-Class Counties competition. He took part in three record partnerships for Norfolk: First wicket. 323 with H. E. Theobald, v. Northumberland in 1939; second wicket, 218 with W. J. Edrich, v. Lincolnshire in 1934; third wicket, 221 with J. C. Thistleton-Smith, v. Kent II in 1936.

In April 1939 he went to Egypt with H. M. Martineau's team, and in ten matches scored 716 runs, the highest aggregate, average 55, and with his slow left-hand spinners headed the bowling averages--17 wickets for 208 runs. After leaving Oxford he was appointed Cricket Master at Harrow, which he left in September 1939 for an educational post under the Soudan Government. He joined the R.A.F. in South Africa, training in Rhodesia, before returning to England in August 1941. He was married three months before his disastrous flight, when 28 years of age.

WAREHAM, CLEMENT, a Wellington Plunket Shield player, died on active service with the New Zealand Expeditionary Force in October.

WHATLEY, FLYING OFFICER WILLIAM DENHAM, was in the list of casualties early in June. Son of the headmaster of Clifton College, he was in the Clifton cricket eleven in 1938 and 1939. He then went to the R.A.F. College, Cranwell, and earned promotion to Flying Officer in July 1941.

WOOD, SERGEANT-NAVIGATOR E. Ion C., R.A.F.V.R., a useful all-round cricketer, who played for Tonbridge School in 1937, was killed flying over Essen on March 9, and was buried at Uden, Holland, aged 22.

His brother, Pilot-Officer Peter G. C. Wood, R.A.F.V.R., aged 20, killed over Cologne on August 31, 1941, and buried at Cologne, played in the Tonbridge XI four seasons, 1936-39, finishing as captain with an average of 36.10. That season he was picked as captain of Lord's Schools and of Public Schools against The Army, but illness prevented him from taking part in these matches.

Pilot-Officer T. R. R. Wood, R.A.F.V.R., not related to the two brothers, was posted missing, having been last seen in operations over Bremen in May 1942, and was officially presumed killed. He averaged 30.40 for Tonbridge School in 1939, and next season, when captain and opening batsman, he met with marked success at Lord's. Scoring 42 and 126 not out, he took a large share in the victory of Tonbridge over Stowe by nine wickets. Wood won the match by getting the big proportion, 126, out of 193 runs wanted for victory in ninety-five minutes.

SUPPLEMENTARY DEATHS IN THE WAR, 1941

GARTLEY, MAJOR JOHN DEVITT ELRICK, who died of wounds received in Libya in December 1941, aged 33, kept wicket for Transvaal in three first-class matches in 1932.

MORRIS, LIEUTENANT L. S., R.N., who was reported missing presumed killed after the loss of a submarine in September 1941, played at Lord's for Royal Navy against The Army and R.A.F. in 1938.

ODHAMS, PILOT OFFICER B. E. L., who was killed while serving in the Middle East in December 1941, bowled well for King's College, Wimbledon, during the 1928 season. In club cricket he was very successful for Teddington and Incogniti.

PAPENFUS, AIR SERGEANT CHRISTIAN F. B., killed in action in Libya on November 18, 1941, aged 27, bowled fast for Orange Free State in provincial matches during the 1939-40 season; he took 23 wickets at 18.82 each. Besides taking six wickets against North-Eastern Transvaal, he played a very good innings of 60, although normally of little account as a batsman.

WITHERINGTON, SERGT.-PILOT A. JOHN, was killed when returning from a raid over Germany on September 16, 1941. From 1936 to 1939 he showed to advantage with both bat and ball for The Leys School, so following the example of two brothers; he finished captain. Eight of his very consistent batting side averaged 45.50 to 20.79. In the autumn John Witherington went to Canada and U.S.A. with the Public Schools team under the auspices of the Overseas Education League of Canada, and was one of the best all-round players--third in the batting averages with 31.50 and the second most effective bowler. Only the captain, W. N. White, also of The Leys, did better. In 1940 he took part in the Cambridge Freshmen's match.

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