World Twenty20 2014

Dhaka pitch a fresh challenge for SL, SA

Mirpur will provide more grip and turn for the spinners than the surface in Chittagong, which held together through most of the Super 10 stage. South Africa and Sri Lanka, therefore, will need to adapt quickly

Alan Gardner and Mohammad Isam

April 2, 2014

Comments: 123 | Text size: A | A

Rangana Herath roars in celebration, New Zealand v Sri Lanka, World T20, Group 1, Chittagong, March 31, 2014
Friendlier pitch awaits Rangana Herath in Dhaka © Getty Images
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As South Africa and Sri Lanka tread back to Dhaka for the final stages of the World T20, a lot of the focus will be on how quickly these two teams adjust to the surface at the Shere Bangla National Stadium. They have been presented with a perceptibly different set of conditions in Chittagong, which were challenging in their own right but didn't resemble those in Dhaka all that closely.

Both sides will play evening matches, which means they may have to contend with a bit of dew, but they can only guess the extent. What they can be sure of is that the surface will be dry and will become drier as the three hours progress. The pitches in Mirpur have been kind to spinners, affording them the luxury of considerable turn and some bounce.

By contrast, the surface at the Zahur Ahmed Chowdhury Stadium was faster than expected, with little turn for the spinners. The brown clay differs from the soil used in Mirpur, where the clay constituent is black, and it keeps its character better throughout the day; during the evening, the behaviour of black clay can be quite changeable, as seen in how much the scores and results varied between the 3.30 pm and 7.30 pm starts.

In Chittagong, leaving on a layer of grass helped retain a little extra moisture and further protection from drying came from a hessian cover used during the main part of the day. There were up to seven pitches on the square, with two main ones rotated for the fixtures at ZACS. Dew was a problem in some of the evening games, and it was unclear whether use of an anti-dew spray had any effect.

Rain also whips in off the sea without much notice, in Chittagong. As summer arrives and temperatures rise - the extra heat and humidity are indicators of rain - brief storms, such as the one that curtailed the game between England and New Zealand, are fairly common. This also played some part in keeping the pitch fresh. The grass ensured the ball skidded on, generally aiding run-scoring.

From a local point of view, it was confusing to see how the Chittagong pitch behaved. It has traditionally been a bastion of batting, and is a favourite of many Bangladeshi batsmen looking for a quick fix in their form. The Bangladesh team have often stated privately, and publicly at times, that the Chittagong pitches make them feel more at home, particularly in Test cricket. Recently, they drew Tests against New Zealand and Sri Lanka there, and their comfort level was quite evident.

Sri Lanka and South Africa can still expect runs in Dhaka, though. There haven't been too many low-scoring games here, apart from Afghanistan getting blown away for 72 or Australia's 86 all out against India. There were ten 150-plus scores with Pakistan making 191 and 190 against Australia and Bangladesh. Five teams have won chasing in ten games, twice in the last over. But teams that have won batting first have mostly won by big margins - 16, 73, 50, 73 and 84 runs.

Three of the top five wicket-takers in Mirpur have been spinners - Amit Mishra, R Ashwin and Samuel Badree - and that was along expected lines. Umar Gul and Al-Amin Hossain were the seamers with most wickets, but that was more due to their variations and diligence than the pitch.

Teams batting second have made faster starts and hit more sixes (16 as opposed to 8) in powerplays than while batting first.

At the start of the Super 10 group stage, New Zealand captain Brendon McCullum perfectly summed up the difference between the two venues.

"In this set-up [Chittagong], I don't anticipate spin will play a great role from the point of seeing the ball turn and bounce past the bat," he said. "Good spinners still manage to play a vital role in T20 cricket but it just won't be quite the same role that we'll see up the road in Dhaka."

Only on the last day of competition at the Zahur Ahmed Chowdhury did the pitch begin slow and offer turn, as New Zealand finally lost out to the conditions. The absence of dew, possibly due to a spray used on the outfield, gave Sri Lanka the advantage, according to stand-in captain Lasith Malinga, and may have helped prepare them for the Dhaka leg of the competition.

"We were worried about the dew factor but fortunately for us there was no dew on that day and it worked to our advantage because the spinners managed to get a grip on the ball and take wickets," Malinga said.

When asked about the difference between the two venues, early in the tournament, Sri Lanka's regular captain Dinesh Chandimal had a succinct response. "We are looking forward to Dhaka."

Alan Gardner is an assistant editor at ESPNcricinfo. He tweets here
Mohammad Isam is ESPNcricinfo's Bangladesh correspondent. He tweets here

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© ESPN Sports Media Ltd.

Posted by DVSK on (April 3, 2014, 11:37 GMT)

@Jagger Did you actually not watch the Asia Cup? Sri Lankan won not Pakistan.

Posted by   on (April 3, 2014, 7:23 GMT)

This T20WC has been awesome, and I hope to see two exciting semi's before the finalists clash on Sunday. Best of luck to SA, SL, WI and Ind. I don't like cricket, I LOVE it. - SA fan

Posted by pmaulik on (April 3, 2014, 5:55 GMT)

As a Indian fan, I would prefer SA against IND in the semis. There are some reasons - 1. SA are not in that form right now winning very narrowly in their previous games. 2. SA are the most vulnerable team against spin right now in the semis. 3. They have not faced Amit Mishra some times in recent past.That gives IND an edge. 4. IND has been playing in Bangladesh for last 40-45 days. 5. Players like Yuvraj , Kohli and Raina like SA attack. 6. IND has the advantage of knowing the pitch. So eagerly awaiting for the semis and best of luck india for the final.

Posted by Jagger on (April 3, 2014, 3:09 GMT)

South Africa can consider themselves lucky they had the better of the pitches and opposition in the lead up. Australia had to play the Asia Cup winner on the same pitch for their first game, the title holders for the second, and the tournament favourites for the third!

One would hope the ICC could get their act together and schedule their tournaments to a location and time where dew-fall does not decide the winner.

Posted by   on (April 2, 2014, 20:09 GMT)

From now on Dew factor is not the only one to be counted, you can count the " LUCK FACTOR" also, specially since is 20 over game . Good luck any of the 4 teams .

Posted by Cricmot on (April 2, 2014, 19:39 GMT)

@ LakshithaR, Dont be under false impression that SL dominated india during mid 90's to mid 2000's and don't miseducate ur fellow srilankan fans. You are misinformed abt Srilanka dominated India during mid 90's to mid 2000's.Where do you have these stats? Go check cricinfo statsguru. Srilanka had dominated india only during 1996-98/99 period. In this period Srilanka won 11 and lost 6 times to india (11-6, this called domination). If u look at 1996-2006 they are pretty much equal Sri-20 Ind-19. During 2000-2010 India won 29 and Srilanka won 21. I don't need to tell u stats in the last 3-4 years coz, I'm sure u r aware of the story. So the fact is Srilanka dominated India only for 2-3 year period. Get ur facts right.

Posted by Cool_Joy on (April 2, 2014, 18:45 GMT)

Though I am a SL fan, I like both SL and WI. Looking forward to a good contest. Go Lanka Go!!!

Cheers from Canada.

Posted by ProdigyA on (April 2, 2014, 17:31 GMT)

Gayle went for a duck in the last match against Pak. Im sure thats not going to happen again. I have a feeling he is going to be the man of the match tomorrow or at least play an important part in helping WI win against SL.

So SL better watch out for Gayle.

Posted by bhriguaneja on (April 2, 2014, 16:35 GMT)

I don't know whats the point of these games. Every one here seems to know who will win or get to the finals. I just want to see good cricket. It doesn't matter who wins.

Posted by kaluwa on (April 2, 2014, 15:53 GMT)

Chndimal? Will he joing again as a captain? Crszzzzzzy. Might be turning point the match. Even he is not suitable for ODI.

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Tournament Results
India v Sri Lanka at Dhaka - Apr 6, 2014
Sri Lanka won by 6 wickets (with 13 balls remaining)
India v South Africa at Dhaka - Apr 4, 2014
India won by 6 wickets (with 5 balls remaining)
Sri Lanka v West Indies at Dhaka - Apr 3, 2014
Sri Lanka won by 27 runs (D/L method)
Pakistan v West Indies at Dhaka - Apr 1, 2014
West Indies won by 84 runs
Bangladesh v Australia at Dhaka - Apr 1, 2014
Australia won by 7 wickets (with 15 balls remaining)
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