Pakistan v WI, World T20, Group 2, Mirpur April 1, 2014

The Afridi-Gul synchronised double slide

Plays of the day for the World T20 match between Pakistan and West Indies in Mirpur

The dismissal
Mohammad Hafeez had bowled five deliveries to Chris Gayle and dismissed him twice before in T20 internationals. The first ball of his second over was the first time he bowled to Gayle in this match. It was tossed up, and drew Gayle out of his crease. Even as the batsman lunged clumsily in an attempt to play it, it spun past him and Kamran Akmal did the rest. Six balls to Gayle from Hafeez, and three dismissals.

The double slide
We often see the joint chase nowadays where two fielders run after a ball, one of them slides and instantly lobs it to the other who gets the throw in quicker. This was synchronization of a different kind. Soon after Gayle departed, Lendl Simmons punched Hafeez square on the off side. Umar Gul and Shahid Afridi raced after it. Afridi put in a slide and stopped the ball. But he had no one to lob it to, as Gul had gone down on the ground at exactly the same time next to Afridi, in the same manner. The legspinner stood up and himself threw the ball to the keeper.

The advisors
Dwayne Bravo went after Gul in the 18th over, hitting the first two balls of the over for sixes. The captain Hafeez ran up to his bowler to have a few words. Gul sprayed the next ball wide outside off. This time, it was Afridi who had something to tell Gul. Following a yorker, Gul bowled it wide again, and was hit for four over point. Now Sohail Tanvir decided his fellow quick bowler needed him, and trotted across to have his say.

The deceptive blow
West Indies' onslaught was in full flow when Darren Sammy heaved at Tanvir in the last over. It was a flattish hit, but the way it hung in the air, the fielder at long-on thought he had a chance. It seemed to have slowed down further, and he even took a few steps forward to make sure it would not fall short. It was deceptive, though. In the end, it cleared the fielder quite comfortably.

The delivery
After having conceded 82 runs off the last five overs, another shock awaited Pakistan right at the start of the chase. Krishmar Santokie might be strictly medium in pace but that did not matter as he sent down an inswinging yorker first up that curled in late towards middle stump. Before Ahmed Shehzad - who had made an unbeaten hundred in Pakistan's previous game against Bangladesh - could bring his bat down on it, it had struck him on the boot, plumb in front.

Abhishek Purohit is a sub-editor at ESPNcricinfo

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