Full Name

Harry Stanley Squires

Born

February 22, 1909, Kingston-upon-Thames, Surrey

Died

January 24, 1950, Old Deer Park, Richmond, Surrey, (aged 40y 336d)

Batting Style

Right hand Bat

Bowling Style

Right arm Offbreak

TEAMS

Wisden Obituary
Harry Squires died at Richmond Royal Hospital as the result of the illness brought about through a virus in the blood. He was 40. On leaving school when 16, Squires began a business life in a City stockbroker's office, but, contrary to his father's wishes, he always wanted to take up cricket as a profession. He spent his leisure time receiving lessons from Aubrey Faulkner, the South African Test player, and he joined Faulkner's coaching staff when a member of Richmond Cricket Club.

Leading county cricketers noticed his ability, and in 1928 and 1929 he appeared for Surrey as an amateur. His debut in first-class cricket was against Middlesex at Lord's. In 1930 he realised his ambition when Surrey gave him a contract as a professional, and no more popular player wore the Surrey colours.

A perfect stylist, Squires was a model batsman for boys to copy. He possessed a rich abundance of strokes, and best of all was his drive through the covers. He never appeared to impart any force into his batting; correct timing and supple wrists sent the ball speeding to the boundary. He was a grand fielder, notably in the deep and at cover. As a slow bowler he specialised in off-breaks, although in later years to suit his county's needs he turned to the leg variety.

Throughout his cricket career Squires wore glasses. During the war he served with the RAF, reaching the rank of Flying Officer. After spending two years in the Hebrides he returned to this country wearing contact lenses, which he used for boxing, squash, Rugby and Association football as well as cricket.

Between 1928 and 1949 Squires scored over 19,000 runs in first-class cricket and hit 37 centuries. His highest innings was 236 for Surrey against Lancashire at The Oval in 1933. He took his benefit in the Middlesex match at The Oval in 1948. He was at the top of his form in the summer preceding his death, when he made 1,785 runs with an average of 37.18.

During the winter Squires kept himself fit playing golf, and only a week or two before his fatal illness began he won the 27-hole foursome handicap in the Croydon and District Alliance competition at Shirley Park for his club, Fulwell. He was partnered by WJ Cox, the former British Ryder Cup golfer. Born at Kingston-on-Thames on February 22, 1909, Squires was a licensee at Hampton Hill. He left a widow and three children.

Paying a tribute to Squires, Mr. HDG Leveson Gower, former president and chairman of Surrey, whose connection with the club covers over fifty years, said: "Squires was an extremely good player, probably better than most people imagined. Often he scored runs when others failed. He was a great example to other professional cricketers. It is because of players like Squires that the profession to which they belong incites so much admiration." Wisden Almanack 1951

Career Averages
Batting & Fielding
FormatMatInnsNORunsHSAve100s50sCtSt
FC410658441918623631.24371051400
Bowling
FormatMatBallsRunsWktsBBIAveEconSR5w10w
FC41022743108173068/5235.342.8574.370
Debut/Last Matches - Player
FC Matches
Span
1928 - 1949