Going, going, gone
Rilee Rossouw could have been out when he got a leading edge off Ben Wheeler that lobbed towards Doug Bracewell at point and went over his head. Rossouw saw the opportunity to run two but could have been out again when the same fielder chased the ball and threw it in for Luke Ronchi to break the stumps. Replays showed the bail had not dislodged by the time Rossouw ran his bat in. Rossouw's luck ran out three balls later when Wheeler drew the edge and Tom Latham took a good, low catch to ensure it was third time unlucky for Rossouw.

Another one bites the dust
If this series was decided on the number of dropped catches, it could be too tight to call after New Zealand put down a few more. One was aerial, when Doug Bracewell spilled the chance off Morne van Wyk's top edge but Latham's was the most dramatic. He was stationed at slip - New Zealand had one in the 45th over and with good reason - when David Wiese pushed loosely at a Bracewell delivery and sent a thick edge his way. Latham moved to his right and had both hands ready to grab the ball but could not hold on as he tumbled over, leaving Bracewell with both ends of a missed chance in the same innings.

Almost run out
Wiese had barely made an impact on the series and when he got fingertips to the ball that he deflected onto the stumps at the non-striker's end, he could have thought that might have changed. Latham, who was backing up, was the man Wiese thought he had run out but replays showed that the batsman was well aware of where he was standing and had got back in time. Latham could have been run out again at the end of that over, when Kane Williamson pushed him for two runs even though they were chancing an arm. A direct hit would have seen Latham run out but the stumps weren't hit.

Actually run out
The fielding wasn't all miss and no hit and David Miller provided the best of the action when he pulled a one-handed flick from square leg that found the stumps and sent Latham on his way. Latham was looking for two runs after working a Wiese offcutter to the leg side but Miller was too quick for him and in one motion pounced on the ball, underarmed it to the striker's end and found Latham short of his ground by a couple of centimetres.

Celebration stats
We've all been wondering what the science behind Imran Tahir's over-the-top wicket-taking celebrations is and now we know: after dismissing Williamson with a googly, Tahir took off at a sprint for 150 metres towards the boundary, in which he reached a top speed of 26 kilometres per hour, before grabbing and kissing his badge. None of his teammates could catch him but at least the tracking technology explains why.