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Casualties of the Gayle storm

Rilee Rossouw played an effective innings Gallo Images

The welcome
Playing in only his third international, Kagiso Rabada was immediately given one of the toughest jobs in cricket: bowling to Chris Gayle in a T20. He did not start too badly, sliding his first delivery past Gayle's outside edge and then beating him for pace with a bouncer that went for four byes. Sufficiently roused, Gayle hit the next two balls for six, then took 14 more from four deliveries in Rabada's second over.

The chance
One of the murderous blows Gayle aimed at Rabada resulted in a towering top edge over cover. Gayle was on 33 at the time and Rilee Rossouw desperately gave chase, knowing that the opportunity could be the difference between winning and losing. Despite throwing himself full stretch, the ball crashed to earth out of reach - and the die was cast.

The shot
Gayle studded the evening with monstrous hits beyond the ropes but the most eye-catching stroke came from a South African bat. West Indies' tactic of bowling cutters was generally successful but when Farhaan Behardien spotted the change of pace from the final ball of the 19th over, he went down on one knee and elegantly lofted it into the crowd beyond deep extra cover.

The drop
On another night, Rossouw's unbeaten half-century might have been a match-winner; but then, on another night, he would not have made it that far. The going had been arduous and he was on 29 from 28 balls when he tried to ramp Andre Russell to fine leg, only for the ball to be intercepted by a diving Sheldon Cottrell. The bowler could not cling on to the chance, however, allowing Rossouw to rattle off 21 more runs from his final 11 deliveries.

The delivery
West Indies made good use of the new ball, with their two genuine quicks, Cottrell and Jason Holder, tying down and then dismissing both South Africa openers. Left-armers are still much sought after in T20 and Cottrell's curling, inswinging yorker to trap Reeza Hendricks was a perfect example of the kind of delivery no batsman wants to face.