"Zaboca choka. Coconut bake and buljol. Guava cheese Seeing as I'm already eating my words just four days into this Test series, it makes sense to open with some more palatable ones should the West Indies be able to build on Sunday's sensational demolition of England at Sabina Park."
Fazeer Mohammed happily wolfs down his words in the Trinidad and Tobago Express

"It may sound mean, but the one regret for West Indians (on Saturday) was that England beat the infamous 47. But you can't have it all."
Garfield Myers rejoices in the Jamaica Observer

"This ground brings back a lot of memories, and it's good to be on the other side this time around. I am sure if I go into the Mound now nobody would say anything. we're going to celebrate, not do too much, but we'll enjoy this moment."
Chris Gayle reflects on how things have come full circle

"Never believe those reports that said cricket in the Caribbean was dying. It was just in mourning for the passing of the good days. The people still loved the game, nursed their hurt, and waited for fortunes to change The image of the West Indian players and people in celebration was utterly captivating. It was like the good old bad old days when the West Indian fast men terrorised the world."
Simon Wilde is put in mind of the 80s

"Neither Charles Dickens nor Enid Blyton could have written a better fairy tale."
Haydn Gill in the Barbados Nation isn't sure it's all quite real

"Every time we have a good performance, people want to know if this is the turning point, is the West Indies on the way up But I keep saying that we have to be really patient because there are days when we have some terrific performances and there are some other days when we are not so good."
West Indies coach John Dyson sounds a note of caution

"West Indian cricket is supposed to be in its death throes, overwhelmed by shifts of culture and values and the disappearance of great men like those Herculean bowlers and batsmen of the quality of Viv Richards and Brian Lara. Yet now, under the quirky but ultimately cool leadership of a batsman like Chris Gayle, who has shown he knows the importance of building an advantage, we see a cricketing Lazarus."
The performance inspires James Lawton in the
Independent to invoke mythical feats

"Waiters, barmen and even house maids, whose preferred sporting topics of conversation had long since switched from cheerless cricket to the Reggae Boys and, more recently, to Usain Bolt and Jamaica's other track stars, were raving about Chris, Jerome, Sars, Sulieman ("but how 'im tall so"), the "boy" Nash, and the other heroes."
Tony Cozier on the mood among ordinary fans

"From the ramshackle Kingston pavilion on the one side of the ground, round past the George Headley Stand, to the thumping sound systems of the 'Mound', there was the unmistakable feeling that something lost had been found."
Mike Atherton has felt it before, and was happy to see the West Indian hostility back