ICC news May 11, 2011

Day-night Tests next year a possibility

60

Floodlit Test matches could become a reality within two years if another 12 months of trials in first-class cricket are successful. The ICC Cricket Committee, which held a two-day meeting at Lord's, recommended that the pink ball should be used in Intercontinental Cup matches and domestic competitions to ensure it can last 80 overs, but the committee is confident that day-night Tests are getting closer.

The trials over the past two years have shown there is little difference between pink and orange balls, and the former version will be the one taken forward. "If the reports coming back are that the ball keeps its condition and colour then I think we will be in a position this time next year to select a couple of venues and trial a day-night Test," Dave Richardson, the ICC general manager of cricket, said.

Now the committee, which makes recommendations to the ICC chief executive committee and board, wants countries to use the pink ball for at least one round of their domestic first-class tournament over the next year. That would mean it appearing in competitions such as the Sheffield Shield, County Championship and SuperSport series. So far, day-night matches of multiple days' duration have been staged in Pakistan and Australia along with two MCC champion county fixtures in Abu Dhabi.

"We've spent a lot of time over the last 24 months trying to develop a ball and to start with we didn't know whether it should be pink, orange, yellow or whatever," Richardson said. "Now we've crystallised that there's not much difference between the pink and orange balls and it was a question of finding a ball that could retain its colour throughout 50-80 overs.

"In the Abu Dhabi match it did, but the conditions were fairly benign, the outfield was a good one, there was no dew and the balls stood up well. We decided we needed further trialling in multi-day competitions. "

The one significant issue to overcome appears to be the impact of dew, which could impact the venues that are able to host floodlit Tests. It has often been seen in one-day internationals how a team bowling second second under the lights can be severely handicapped by a wet ball and it can make the toss too influential on the outcome. "We were worried by the dew factor," Clive Lloyd, the committee chairman, "if one side bowls first and other bowls at night it could be with a bar of soap."

Richardson added: "The venue still needs to have decent lights, somewhere like Lord's, Sydney or Abu Dhabi. You also need to play it at a venue, and time of year, where dew isn't going to come in a seven o'clock. You can have the best ball in the world but it would be unfair in those conditions."

The push behind floodlit Tests is largely to try to bring crowds back to the game in countries where they have severely dwindled, although Richardson believes all Full Members will be interested in trying the concept.

"I'm not as pessimistic as some when it comes to needing to save Test cricket," Richardson said. "I do think it affords the board the opportunity to play Test cricket when more people are available to watch and also commercially it can be more valuable to play at those times of the day; the prime TV viewing time in the evening."

The hope is floodlights will bring people through gates, but as always television isn't far from the equation.

Andrew McGlashan is an assistant editor at ESPNcricinfo

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • Karthi_2K11 on May 14, 2011, 23:45 GMT

    (Continued from Part I above) Part II: We already have examples of year-round closed-roof stadiums like the Colonial stadium (Telstra Dome) in Melbourne, which have held international Cricket matches. Yes, these are big-budget decisions to make, but with Cricket raking in much moolah, I think that regional Cricket boards would have the wherewithal to do it.

  • Karthi_2K11 on May 14, 2011, 23:42 GMT

    Part I: Floodlit Test matches are fine, but in order to woo the spectator's interest back, one needs to attack the root cause and not the symptoms. The spectators want an outcome for the match where they have devoted time (multiple days) and money for watching, and they are not getting it. A major part of the problem lies in the fact that inclement weather plays spoilsport for results to happen. Floodlit matches could be a work-around and extend the playing hours so that one can bypass any temporary interruptions in play. However, a more permanent solution would be to prevent it (for instance, rain) from being a problem in the first place, and there are already successful examples of that. Take for instance, the Blue Jays's (Baseball) Skydome in Toronto, or the Centre Court in Wimbledon (Tennis); both have retractable roofs. Skydome has had it since 1989, and theirs takes 20 minutes alone to cover, and make the match an indoor one. Wimbledon got it only two years ago. Pls. see part II.

  • Notredam on May 13, 2011, 7:07 GMT

    Ireland deserve test status..Voice of poor will not go unheard..

  • RGee on May 13, 2011, 1:53 GMT

    I don't think test should be played under flood lights.........what happened to the tradition? Otherwise just eliminate the tests....................

  • on May 12, 2011, 19:29 GMT

    if you want to improve test cricket, improve the pitches, especially in the subcontinent. Side batting under lights in a day night test match will have it easy if there is dew on the ground. Even if dew is not around, there are certain grounds where the pitch just livens up under lights and seems around which makes batting second much more difficult than batting first. We need sporting pitches where result will be guaranteed, where the fast bowlers/ seamers have their say on day 1 and 2 batting eases on day 3 and by day 4 and day 5 spinners come into play. I have no issue against drawn test matches, but even drawn test matches can be exciting. No point having tame high scoring draws that boost the batting averages of certain players and do nothing else.

  • bumsonseats on May 12, 2011, 17:27 GMT

    its test match cricket for gods sake. if it aint broke dont need fixing. if day /night cricket is played in england in late aug/sept the bowling attack bowling will get a massive benifit. do these guys on the icc panel think they have to tinker with everything they discuss.dpk

  • on May 12, 2011, 16:36 GMT

    Please don't make tests boring. They already have a boring quotient in them, like when two pathetic bowling teams battle it out.

    India and Sri Lanka? Oh yeah.

  • Cryptex on May 12, 2011, 16:24 GMT

    @Cpt.Meanster : Luks like u r jealous of the fact dat USA doesnt have a test status n probably never will( atleast in the immediate future). If u r so interested in fast paced games, go n watch Rugby, NBA or Nascar. F1 wud also do. And I dont adore colonial traditions either but for me Test matches are still the real test f the batsmen and the bowlers. T20 n ODi have become too batsmen-friendly. A nail-biting contest between bat n ball is way more interesting than seeing the bowler being hit all over the park.

  • rayinto on May 12, 2011, 15:15 GMT

    Floodlights? Do you realize that parts of the world would have to experience blackouts to accomodate this? You guys are tinkering and messing up the game. Alsolutely nothing is wrong with test cricket. In fact, only real cricketers play test crickets. Its a game of strategy - that 1-day formats offer much less of, and 20/20 least of.Mess up those two format all you want, but please leave test cricket alone. Those who hate tests mostly have short attention span and no time to stop and smell the roses. Preserve tests for the true lover of the sport. You want to know the true value of a cricketer, just look up his test records. Anybody can swipe in 20/20.

  • gentlemans-game on May 12, 2011, 13:57 GMT

    Leave test cricket alone. The only acceptable change is the REMOVAL of all sponsor logos and commercials messages from team uniforms, cricket kit, stumps and umpire clothing. The five day game has to be protected from commercial exploitation.

  • Karthi_2K11 on May 14, 2011, 23:45 GMT

    (Continued from Part I above) Part II: We already have examples of year-round closed-roof stadiums like the Colonial stadium (Telstra Dome) in Melbourne, which have held international Cricket matches. Yes, these are big-budget decisions to make, but with Cricket raking in much moolah, I think that regional Cricket boards would have the wherewithal to do it.

  • Karthi_2K11 on May 14, 2011, 23:42 GMT

    Part I: Floodlit Test matches are fine, but in order to woo the spectator's interest back, one needs to attack the root cause and not the symptoms. The spectators want an outcome for the match where they have devoted time (multiple days) and money for watching, and they are not getting it. A major part of the problem lies in the fact that inclement weather plays spoilsport for results to happen. Floodlit matches could be a work-around and extend the playing hours so that one can bypass any temporary interruptions in play. However, a more permanent solution would be to prevent it (for instance, rain) from being a problem in the first place, and there are already successful examples of that. Take for instance, the Blue Jays's (Baseball) Skydome in Toronto, or the Centre Court in Wimbledon (Tennis); both have retractable roofs. Skydome has had it since 1989, and theirs takes 20 minutes alone to cover, and make the match an indoor one. Wimbledon got it only two years ago. Pls. see part II.

  • Notredam on May 13, 2011, 7:07 GMT

    Ireland deserve test status..Voice of poor will not go unheard..

  • RGee on May 13, 2011, 1:53 GMT

    I don't think test should be played under flood lights.........what happened to the tradition? Otherwise just eliminate the tests....................

  • on May 12, 2011, 19:29 GMT

    if you want to improve test cricket, improve the pitches, especially in the subcontinent. Side batting under lights in a day night test match will have it easy if there is dew on the ground. Even if dew is not around, there are certain grounds where the pitch just livens up under lights and seems around which makes batting second much more difficult than batting first. We need sporting pitches where result will be guaranteed, where the fast bowlers/ seamers have their say on day 1 and 2 batting eases on day 3 and by day 4 and day 5 spinners come into play. I have no issue against drawn test matches, but even drawn test matches can be exciting. No point having tame high scoring draws that boost the batting averages of certain players and do nothing else.

  • bumsonseats on May 12, 2011, 17:27 GMT

    its test match cricket for gods sake. if it aint broke dont need fixing. if day /night cricket is played in england in late aug/sept the bowling attack bowling will get a massive benifit. do these guys on the icc panel think they have to tinker with everything they discuss.dpk

  • on May 12, 2011, 16:36 GMT

    Please don't make tests boring. They already have a boring quotient in them, like when two pathetic bowling teams battle it out.

    India and Sri Lanka? Oh yeah.

  • Cryptex on May 12, 2011, 16:24 GMT

    @Cpt.Meanster : Luks like u r jealous of the fact dat USA doesnt have a test status n probably never will( atleast in the immediate future). If u r so interested in fast paced games, go n watch Rugby, NBA or Nascar. F1 wud also do. And I dont adore colonial traditions either but for me Test matches are still the real test f the batsmen and the bowlers. T20 n ODi have become too batsmen-friendly. A nail-biting contest between bat n ball is way more interesting than seeing the bowler being hit all over the park.

  • rayinto on May 12, 2011, 15:15 GMT

    Floodlights? Do you realize that parts of the world would have to experience blackouts to accomodate this? You guys are tinkering and messing up the game. Alsolutely nothing is wrong with test cricket. In fact, only real cricketers play test crickets. Its a game of strategy - that 1-day formats offer much less of, and 20/20 least of.Mess up those two format all you want, but please leave test cricket alone. Those who hate tests mostly have short attention span and no time to stop and smell the roses. Preserve tests for the true lover of the sport. You want to know the true value of a cricketer, just look up his test records. Anybody can swipe in 20/20.

  • gentlemans-game on May 12, 2011, 13:57 GMT

    Leave test cricket alone. The only acceptable change is the REMOVAL of all sponsor logos and commercials messages from team uniforms, cricket kit, stumps and umpire clothing. The five day game has to be protected from commercial exploitation.

  • on May 12, 2011, 13:45 GMT

    Match schedules are prime factors for spectator attendance. Matches with 4th and 5th days on weekends or public holidays will definitely attract larger crowds. Also avoiding rainy seasons will go a long way in increasing viewership, and preventing dull series. DRS is fine, but please no pink or orange balls. Supersubs, anybody? And yes, test championships please...

  • Stark62 on May 12, 2011, 13:43 GMT

    This will make Tests really, really interesting!

    I mean we all know how hard it is to bat under lights in Colombo but in broad daylight, the pitch is an absolute road plus, the dew factor kicks in around the evening time is well.

    All in all, it is a good concept especially in the Sub-continent.

  • One_Religion_Cricket on May 12, 2011, 13:32 GMT

    Yep. Thats great. This way we can have more load shedding in India, and a great business for the generator/power backup companies. This is got to stop. Why do we behave like we are a 2nd world country? Remember its the BCCI and the players who are rich, not the rest of the country. I was dancing like crazy when we won the world cup, but then the cash/reward obscenities started and left such a bad aftertaste. None of the money is going to help the infrastucture, no domestic grounds will be better. All its going to change is bigger cars and houses for BCCI and the players.

  • Cpt.Meanster on May 12, 2011, 13:29 GMT

    Lets face it people. Test matches are boring, period ! I grow old watching the game over 5 days. I can't believe how most of you 'love' that thing ? I as an American need high rush, quick action cricket and T20 and 50 overs provide that. Tests are fit for the old colonial mentality people who adore the UK and its traditions. This is the 21st century and as a proud republican I shunt those values. This is the era of club cricket and colored clothing. The whites can serve as my table cloth.

  • Sharath281 on May 12, 2011, 13:21 GMT

    Let test cricket remain the way it is. The sanctity of the game lies in preserving its tradition which to a large extent is contributed by the finer elements like white costumes, red cherry etc., Enough of damage has already been done in the guise of popularizing the game across the globe. All the experiments be confined to T20 and ODI. I can't imagine test cricket played in coloured clothing under lights. That takes up so much of the romance associated with the game.

  • on May 12, 2011, 13:16 GMT

    When two good teams play test cricket the color of the ball does not matter and neither does it matter if the match is played in the day time or night. People still flock to watch test matches played amongst Australia - India - England - South Africa and they will continue to do so for the foreseeable future. You need pink balls and day/night matches to attract people to watch test matches between Zimbabwe and West Indies.

  • dittz27 on May 12, 2011, 12:53 GMT

    I can give a point of view as an England/Indian supporter in England. Iv almost lost all interest in the English game now for the following reasons: Eng is not really Eng anymore. Its almost like the SA 'b' team. This win at any costs mentaility of the Eng Adminstrators is disgusting. I dont want to watch a SA 'b' team. I would rather watch and support an Eng 'b' team!! All of the genuine charectors such as Monty etc are gone!! My second and most important point is PRICING! I was thinking of going to see some cricket this summer-£100 per ticket. Can i repeat for that my fellow cric lovers £100 PER TICKET! Have they gone mad? Now india v england will be sold out, but will Eng v Sri Lanka??? Was Eng v WI sold out ? NOPE! Yeah fine bring on the day night matches, i dont care, if something interesting is happening i'll turn on my big HD tv and have look. If there aint, i'll switch. I am sure not spending my hard earned money on a jumbled team of misfits from here there and everywhere.

  • krazzyking on May 12, 2011, 12:46 GMT

    leave Tests alone... nothing can change the "sweat it out" and "sun in your eyes" bit.... it would be ugly to see a schedule that reads... 1st Test (D/N) and a 2nd test (D)

  • on May 12, 2011, 12:29 GMT

    Test matches need to be more result oriented. Last summer, a result came in each of the 6 matches that were played in England. The reason: Good pitches that supported both batting and bowling and hence the matches were a delight to watch and follow. It's always better to have pitches that support bowlers than those pitches that supports batsman in a test match. This allows a great contest between bat and ball. When a batsman ducks ball after ball on a bouncer or the ball brushes his pads due to the constant inswing and appeals are made every other ball, the interest of the spectators is heightened. I personally would love watching the teams getting out at a mediocre score of 200-300 in each innings (like the last english summer) rather than going past 500 in one innings and getting a result that is marginally one sided or its a draw.

  • on May 12, 2011, 12:17 GMT

    I don't agree with this at all. Test cricket is a magnificent game as it is - leave it alone you buffons! You have 2020 and 5050 to realise your commercial objectives.

  • nathangonmad on May 12, 2011, 12:03 GMT

    Please don't change test matches :(

  • on May 12, 2011, 11:43 GMT

    u can change odi,t20 format,please dont talk about to change the real and traditional(test) format of cricket.the people who love the cricket by heart,the oldest format is allways acceptable to them.

  • Sheela on May 12, 2011, 11:06 GMT

    Day night Test are definitely welcome. But this alone may not bring the crowds back to the previous levels. Administrators have specifed 90 overs a day in a span of 6 hours play which has not been effectively endorsed and almost every team bowls much lesser number of overs. This reduction robs the sectators of interest and one of the reasons for low attendances. As one former Test cricket stated that this should be further improved by making it compulsory that each seccion of 2 hours in Tests, at least 30 0vers are bowled. Combined with this pitches should be prepared that all Tests end with definite results unless the match is affected by rains and other causes beyond control. This does not mean only fastest poccible pitches to favour select countries should be prepared.

  • vipinchaudhary2325 on May 12, 2011, 10:50 GMT

    people are not coming to see Test Matches in Ground...several reasons are dere (T20, HD Cable TV, Large TV Screens, Limitation of Time, Increase in Heat).. so dont see ny problem in day night test matches.. may be people willl come to Ground to see Test Matches.... It was not a very long time ago when The Test Match Tickets in India were sold in Black... now u can easily buy ticket, because dere r not many people in the ground.... something is wrong??.... some people say dont change the tradtion..... what will tradition do if dere is no people to see matches in ground

  • alvinmanoj on May 12, 2011, 10:35 GMT

    Waste of money and energy. India might hosts these games successfully in terms of cricket, but India is very poor in producing energy. This will mean more electrical bills on the poor common Indians.

  • thaamansaranya on May 12, 2011, 10:15 GMT

    Test matches is all about Traditional Cricket...Already u spoiled cricket by the invention of T20... but, for the survival of Test Cricket few changes are needed...

  • TheUparcut on May 12, 2011, 9:45 GMT

    I hope these floodlit Tests don't affect India's ranking.

  • JiteshGOD on May 12, 2011, 8:54 GMT

    very good.....but i don think dis will make tests more interesting

  • sunnymachoo on May 12, 2011, 8:52 GMT

    Vinay Varma is right. There have been too much changes in cricket already. Conventional classic cricket is fading away =(

  • Saim93 on May 12, 2011, 8:50 GMT

    Just a very silly ploy which i dont think will make any difference int he long term

  • harshalb on May 12, 2011, 8:49 GMT

    Cricket is meant to be played between 10 to 5 in white flannel using a red ball with breaks for drinks, lunch and tea. The pitches are meant to assist fast bowling on first day and in mornings and help spinners on fifth day. The ball should swing in mornings and under cloudy weather. Runners are part of the game. Period.

  • RAVI_BOPARA on May 12, 2011, 8:08 GMT

    SOON THE ICC WILL HAVE NIGHT ONLY TEST MATCHES !!!

  • ragsindia on May 12, 2011, 8:00 GMT

    So much of noise about contribution to green cause and planning to waste power for floodlights for 5 days for 1 game. has ICC not herad actions speak louder than the words.

  • Notredam on May 12, 2011, 7:35 GMT

    Rubbish from ICC in boycott language...

  • Notredam on May 12, 2011, 7:35 GMT

    Ireland shud play World cup 2015..

  • on May 12, 2011, 6:56 GMT

    With D/N test matches, cricket is not going green at all. Too much waste of energy. Lets keep traditional and green.

  • rsrinath on May 12, 2011, 6:49 GMT

    d/n tests will promote test cricket for sure.but we have to look at the broader picture of saving renewable energy.as far as india is concerned no point in talking about the lack of electricity in rural places when the bcci is conducting so many odi's and ipl matches under floodlights.it will be great if our govt orders the bcci to conduct these matches in day time under sunlight.plz comment on this

  • anikbrad on May 12, 2011, 6:25 GMT

    2 IMPORTANT POINTS TO INCORPORATE ARE RUNNER ISSUE - DONT OVERTHROW THEM USE DUDESIOUSLY FOR INJRED PLAYEDS NOT FOR CRAMPS AND TIEREDNESS. LET OPP CAPTAIN CHOOSE THE RUNNER

  • on May 12, 2011, 6:20 GMT

    I don't see how it will bring crowds back, ultimately its cricket that is what people want to see. if it comes a time when it is only the Ashes playing in white so be it, australia doesn't have an issue with tests.

  • anikbrad on May 12, 2011, 6:11 GMT

    THE POINTS THAT ARE OK: 1. THE PP BETWEEN 15-40 OVERS IS NOT GOOD AS THE POWER PLAY MUST BE FLEXIBLE. AND WHAT ABOUT FIELDING PP OPTIONS. 2. THE USE OF NIGHT TEST; GOOD BUT ONE MUST TRY IN SELECTIVE AREAS WHRE THERE IS NO DUE AND ALSO GIVE EACH COUNTRY 1-2 STEDIA AS COVERED ONE. WITH SO MUCH MONEY INDIA CAN BUILD ATLEAST 10 COVERED STEDIA 3. THE RUNNERS TO GO AYAY- GOOD IF THE PLAYERS ARE NOT HURT DURING THAT GAME, NOT FOR CRAMPS, TIEREDNESS, AND EVEN IF THE RUNNER IS ALLOWED THE RUNNER SHOULD BE IN THE HAND OF OPPOSITION CAPTAIN TO CHOOSE THE PLAYER LIKE IF TENDULKAR IS INJURED. U ALLOW THE RUNNER BUT NOT RAINA BUT NEHRA AS PER THE OPPSITION POINT AS HE IS POOR RUNNER. THIS WOULD BE GOOD. 4. I STILL FEEL THE RUNNERCAN BE MANKADED. IT WAS AGOOD RULE. 5. THE CHANGE OF BALLS SHOULD NOT BE ALLOWED. THIS HAS BEEN DONE TO REDUCE THE INFLUENCE OF PAK, IND,SRI ON REVERSE SWING-LIKE ZAK, MALINGA, GUL. IT GIVES UPPER HAND TO SPEED NOT SWING

  • TamilIndian on May 12, 2011, 5:33 GMT

    People will watch test matches if

    1. Have sporting pitches where there is bat ball balance. 2. Have meaningful series (may be have two rungs of countries) and then have a competition kind of setup. 3. Schedule based on the local holiday times - for example in chennai there used to be a test match tradition around pongal time - this has been totally forgotten now.

    I think the day night venture for test cricket is not good - IMHO

  • candyfloss on May 12, 2011, 5:32 GMT

    If I remember correctly D/N tests were proposed by CA who noticed that when matches were played in WA it attracted more television viewers due to the difference in time zone,people in other parts of australia could tune in to watch after a day's work.The idea of D/N maybe fine in certain countries but in asia the outfield is severly affected by dew,I doubt this would be a successful experiment.

  • on May 12, 2011, 5:21 GMT

    its a nice one we are eager to watch it Test Cricket going on to rock when it comes in d/n

  • King_Anish on May 12, 2011, 5:04 GMT

    Great Decision!!!. ICC is contributing its share to add to Global Warming.

  • Padstow_Hornets on May 12, 2011, 5:02 GMT

    I don't see why this is so frowned upon?

    It will be great, rocking up after work to watch test cricket on a warm summer evening. Or even racing home to catch the final 2 sessions Some of us can't afford to buy tickets and miss days of work. Bums on seats and eyes on televisions are what we want and we can't be doing that from the work place.

  • Hoggy_1989 on May 12, 2011, 4:38 GMT

    Worst. Idea. Ever. It has been well established that pink cricket balls stop swinging after 10 overs, the subcontinent gets really bad dew in the nighttime (eg. 2011 WC D/N games)...and what the hell was wrong with daytime cricket anyway? Oh, I know. Low TV ratings and low crowd attendances. Well, who's fault is that? Make Test cricket more interesting (i.e. more competitive pitches)...instead of the same game a few hours later!

  • Amarsubb on May 12, 2011, 3:44 GMT

    @ Waj_Sankara- a white ball would be the ideal solution, however because of the lacquer used to produce that bright white colour, only lasts for a short time- hence the 35 over ball change in ODI's and ODD's.

  • ganeshraam on May 12, 2011, 3:36 GMT

    @Waj_Sankara The reason behind not using white balls is because, the players tend to wear white traditional test match gear and it becomes quite a difficulty for players to pick up the white ball. Also White ball is not a suitable candidate to hold 80-90 overs a day when compared to Red, Pink and Orange balls. Red balls couldnt be used as it becomes quite difficult to pick the ball during twilight time. So the most probable candidate would be the pink and orange balls and now it looks certain that they might zero in the pink ball in stead of the orange ball as it again turns to be something which cannot hold its color for a longer duration say 80-90 overs.

  • Harshad_Bendle on May 12, 2011, 3:36 GMT

    why waste so much electricity when they can be played in natural light?

  • somu1984 on May 12, 2011, 3:31 GMT

    It is a good decision to bring the crowds back into Test cricket by having Day-Night Test cricket. But the major hurdle I could see here is Dew Factor in subcontinent. No matter what would be the colour of the balls, dew can spoil a great innings. It will be pretty difficult to grip the ball in these conditions. Committee should test in subcontinent pitches and in all the seasons before implementing Day-Night test match.

  • stationmaster on May 12, 2011, 3:22 GMT

    I think this is a GREAT idea - and should be used for ALL tests, whether it's the ASHES or a minow Vs minow test. We NEED tests to be supported by big crowds, and batsmen going off for slightly below average light, is pathetic. This way, fast bowlers can stay on, and people don't get put off buying tickets on the day, if the skies are a bit gloomy. WELL DONE the ICC, credit where it's due, lets make this happen.

  • on May 12, 2011, 3:20 GMT

    Insanity. Cricket stop tinkering, how come with the last 20 years we had a great system and now with the Behemoth called 20/20 everyone wants to tinker. Values have gone out the window, one day day night, the next thing we'll have is naked cricket!

  • Jan on May 12, 2011, 3:00 GMT

    Day/Night test matches can be for some one-of games but definitely cannot be accepted for traditional test matches like the Ashes or even Border-Gavaskar trophy. Test matches are the life of cricket and better let it be played with the usual red balls and let the pink balls be tried in ODIs so that it lasts just 50 overs.

  • Jama on May 12, 2011, 2:48 GMT

    The problem with ICC is that they do not consider fans opinions. Test cricket would soon lose its identity.. I would hate to see a Daynight test match.. where conditions would favour one team.

    Whats next????? reduce the number of days with powerplays included???

    and whats up with the people loving big sixes and high scoring games...

    I miss those days where even 200 - 220 would be considered as a competitve score to chase down.

    Best game in 2011 would cup was ENG-SA game where SA could nt even chase Eng's 160 odd runs...

    I wish those days return back.. Sick and tired to T20 and high scoring games....

  • on May 12, 2011, 2:39 GMT

    Rather than blaming T20s that it is killing Test Cricket, ICC should find a way to modernize and attract people once again. And this step, will come in handy.

  • on May 12, 2011, 2:32 GMT

    Advantages with D/N test matches: Loadsa ppl can come in and watch the game, good for test cricket, there wont be nething called "bad light stopped play", audience will have a great view

    Disadvantages: There is a huge possibility of Dew getting in subcontinent so it wud play a major role in the match, There wont be nething called ealy morning swing which could trouble the batsmen but instead it could come in to effect during the night. if the ball is bieng reversed the shiny part can be clearly identified in a pink ball.

    I badly wanna see a india vs pakistan or Australia Vs England for D/N test match that would be a great exhibition for the game. Change is required let the Test matches give the colour and fun more than wat a t-20 game gives

  • on May 12, 2011, 2:00 GMT

    You cant use white ball Sankara, the players outfit and the ball cant be of same color sir :)

  • Meety on May 12, 2011, 1:00 GMT

    Hopefully the possibility of day/night tests will be only for low-rating matches. In Oz I think it might work for matches against Zimbabwe & Bangladesh. Would hate to see a day/night Ashes test!

  • Waj_Sankara on May 12, 2011, 0:21 GMT

    Why not use the white ball? Isn't that better?

  • mightymf2000 on May 12, 2011, 0:13 GMT

    Great news though the boards should vote which colour pink or orange.

  • No featured comments at the moment.

  • mightymf2000 on May 12, 2011, 0:13 GMT

    Great news though the boards should vote which colour pink or orange.

  • Waj_Sankara on May 12, 2011, 0:21 GMT

    Why not use the white ball? Isn't that better?

  • Meety on May 12, 2011, 1:00 GMT

    Hopefully the possibility of day/night tests will be only for low-rating matches. In Oz I think it might work for matches against Zimbabwe & Bangladesh. Would hate to see a day/night Ashes test!

  • on May 12, 2011, 2:00 GMT

    You cant use white ball Sankara, the players outfit and the ball cant be of same color sir :)

  • on May 12, 2011, 2:32 GMT

    Advantages with D/N test matches: Loadsa ppl can come in and watch the game, good for test cricket, there wont be nething called "bad light stopped play", audience will have a great view

    Disadvantages: There is a huge possibility of Dew getting in subcontinent so it wud play a major role in the match, There wont be nething called ealy morning swing which could trouble the batsmen but instead it could come in to effect during the night. if the ball is bieng reversed the shiny part can be clearly identified in a pink ball.

    I badly wanna see a india vs pakistan or Australia Vs England for D/N test match that would be a great exhibition for the game. Change is required let the Test matches give the colour and fun more than wat a t-20 game gives

  • on May 12, 2011, 2:39 GMT

    Rather than blaming T20s that it is killing Test Cricket, ICC should find a way to modernize and attract people once again. And this step, will come in handy.

  • Jama on May 12, 2011, 2:48 GMT

    The problem with ICC is that they do not consider fans opinions. Test cricket would soon lose its identity.. I would hate to see a Daynight test match.. where conditions would favour one team.

    Whats next????? reduce the number of days with powerplays included???

    and whats up with the people loving big sixes and high scoring games...

    I miss those days where even 200 - 220 would be considered as a competitve score to chase down.

    Best game in 2011 would cup was ENG-SA game where SA could nt even chase Eng's 160 odd runs...

    I wish those days return back.. Sick and tired to T20 and high scoring games....

  • Jan on May 12, 2011, 3:00 GMT

    Day/Night test matches can be for some one-of games but definitely cannot be accepted for traditional test matches like the Ashes or even Border-Gavaskar trophy. Test matches are the life of cricket and better let it be played with the usual red balls and let the pink balls be tried in ODIs so that it lasts just 50 overs.

  • on May 12, 2011, 3:20 GMT

    Insanity. Cricket stop tinkering, how come with the last 20 years we had a great system and now with the Behemoth called 20/20 everyone wants to tinker. Values have gone out the window, one day day night, the next thing we'll have is naked cricket!

  • stationmaster on May 12, 2011, 3:22 GMT

    I think this is a GREAT idea - and should be used for ALL tests, whether it's the ASHES or a minow Vs minow test. We NEED tests to be supported by big crowds, and batsmen going off for slightly below average light, is pathetic. This way, fast bowlers can stay on, and people don't get put off buying tickets on the day, if the skies are a bit gloomy. WELL DONE the ICC, credit where it's due, lets make this happen.