India v England, 1st ODI, Hyderabad

Dhoni and Jadeja crush England

The Report by Andrew Miller

October 14, 2011

Comments: 411 | Text size: A | A

India 300 for 7 (Dhoni 87*, Raina 61) beat England 174 (Cook 60, Jadeja 3-34) by 126 runs
Scorecard and ball-by-ball details


A unique follow-through from MS Dhoni, India v England, 1st ODI, Hyderabad, October 14, 2011
MS Dhoni's hard-hitting 87 not out was the bedrock of India's victory © AFP
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  • India's 126-run win is their second-largest in ODIs against England, next only to their triumph by 158 runs in Rajkot in 2008. That, incidentally, was also the first ODI of a series.
  • India scored 161 runs in their last 16 overs, which is their fifth-highest during this period in an ODI over the last decade. Their highest is 182, in two matches - against South Africa in Gwalior, and against Bermuda in Port of Spain.
  • MS Dhoni's unbeaten 87 is his fourth successive ODI half-century, and his third unbeaten one. He averages 45 against England, while his overall ODI average has crept back to more than 50.
  • Dhoni and Suresh Raina are only the seventh non-opening pair from India to add more than 2000 partnership runs. Their average and strike rate are the best among those seven.
  • Dhoni has become the first wicketkeeper-captain to take 100 catches. Kumar Sangakkara is next with 59 catches behind the stumps as captain.

MS Dhoni marked India's homecoming with a brutal innings of 87 not out from 70 balls, before the left-arm spin of Ravindra Jadeja sparked a dramatic English batting collapse, as the team that failed to win a single international fixture on their recent tour of England returned to form with a crushing 126-run victory at Hyderabad.

Dhoni's performance was his fourth half-century in as many international innings, but whereas the last three had been insufficient to force victory, this performance was more reminiscent of his last performance in a home international - his crushing 91 not out in the World Cup final against Sri Lanka in April.

After winning his first toss in six attempts against England, Dhoni chose to bat first on a slow surface, but India were struggling on 139 for 4 after 34 overs before he and Suresh Raina turned on the after-burners as a further 161 were added in the final third of the innings. As had regularly been the case in England, he started cautiously against a disciplined attack, and had reached 5 from 18 balls before belting his first boundary, from Ravi Bopara, to signal India's late charge.

In total, Dhoni belted 10 fours and one six in his innings, the latter coming from a trademark helicopter flick off Steven Finn in the penultimate over of the innings. Finn had started his day's work with impressive pace and accuracy, and should have had a first-over wicket when Jonathan Trott dropped a sitter off Ajinkya Rahane at second slip - a moment that only the 26,000 crowd were able to witness, thanks to a TV rights dispute that caused a three-over blackout. But Finn finished with the bruised figures of 1 for 67 in nine overs, with his solitary wicket that of Raina in his seventh over, moments after he had been battered for another six over long-on.

Raina, whose brutality against the full length ball was a sight to behold, crunched 61 from 55 balls, with both of his sixes coming from the final four balls of his innings. Like Dhoni, he had opted for circumspection in the early part of his stay, but the longer his 62-run stand for the fifth wicket continued, the more boisterous the Hyderabad crowd became.

It had been a more muted affair in the early part of India's innings. Parthiv Patel was run out at the non-striker's end for 9 as Finn fingertipped a Rahane drive onto the stumps, while Rahane himself had reached 15 from 41 balls when Graeme Swann dragged him out of his crease with his third delivery of the match to give Craig Kieswetter an easy stumping.

In his first match since recovering from concussion, Gautam Gambhir confirmed his fitness with a fluent 32 from 33 balls. However, Jade Dernbach's liquorice allsorts proved hard to pick and tough to get away on the surface, and the slower ball that did for Gambhir was a beauty. It looped up above the batsman's eyeline and dropped sharply to rap his shin in front of leg stump.

At 79 for 3 after 18 overs, the game was very much in the balance. However, England's position could, and probably should, have been even better after 25 overs, when Samit Patel repeated Finn's trick of dropping his fingertips on a straight drive. It was Raina this time who was in peril as the bails were dislodged, but after a lengthy delay for the TV adjudication, he was given the benefit of the doubt by the third umpire, Sudhir Ashani.

In the final analysis, however, it really didn't matter. Though Alastair Cook continued his impressive form as England captain with 60 from 63 balls, his dismissal in the 23rd over of the innings precipated a dramatic collapse at the hands of Jadeja and R Ashwin. England tumbled from 111 for 2 to 134 for 7 in the space of 40 balls, and only Samit Patel (16) and the No. 10, Finn, with a run a ball 18, provided any resistance.

Praveen Kumar, India's star bowler from their ill-fated tour of England, had launched India's defence in fine style, opening up with a maiden to Cook, and he had not conceded a run when he extracted Kieswetter with his eighth delivery, a full-length ball that jagged off the seam to take a thin edge through to Dhoni.

The loss of their top-order powerhitter caused England to rejig their conventional batting order, with Kevin Pietersen emerging at No. 3 ahead of the more staid Trott. The plan looked to be paying off as Pietersen launched his innings with ominous resolve, but having struck three fours in a 28-ball 19, he attempted a quick single to mid-on where Ashwin nailed him with a direct hit.

Trott then appeared at No. 4, and for 13.3 overs he and Cook steadied the innings, adding 71 for the third wicket to give England a solid platform. But then, having brought up his fifty at exactly a run a ball, Cook gave his innings away with a loose clip to deep midwicket off Ravindra Jadeja, and thwacked his pad with his bat in frustration as he left the crease.

Worse was to follow for England two overs later. Trott, whose 26 from 42 balls had been a typically measured performance, attempted an ungainly smear across the line against Jadeja and lost his leg stump, and eight balls later, Ravi Bopara drove loosely at Ashwin and chipped a simple return catch to the bowler.

Jadeja by now was on a roll with the crowd fully behind him, and he extended England's collapse to four wickets in 26 balls when Jonny Bairstow, the hero of the run-chase in Cardiff, last month, also offered up a return catch. His figures after four overs were 3 for 17, and England's unbeaten run against India in 2011 was soon all over.

Innings Dot balls 4s 6s PP1 PP2 PP3 Last 10 overs NB/Wides
India 144 22 5 47/1 20/1 59/1 91/2 1/18
England 115 16 1 48/2 29/0 26/2 n/a 0/3

Andrew Miller is UK editor of ESPNcricinfo

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© ESPN Sports Media Ltd.

Posted by IndiaPunjab on (October 17, 2011, 17:42 GMT)

Too the england fan who said other day; indias batsman like rahane and kohli have reached their limit and wont get any bettor unlike bairstrow. LOOOOOOOOOOOL !!!! Kohli just hit yet another 100 despite his young age! Kohli is an outstanding talent as proven AGAIN. Amount of 100s he has already in ODI cricket puts most englands batsman to shame considering amount of games and their age. I live in egland and england are my 2nd team BUT, some of the stuff england fans are coming out with is comical. Englands last 15 odis in india, drawn 1, won 1, lost 13. LOL . After 1 good summer they talked about becoming an australia or west indies. Them 2 dominated all forms of the game, not lose by 10 wickets in wc quarter final and have records such as 5th in odi rankings and won 1 in last 15 in india.

Posted by kristee on (October 17, 2011, 17:31 GMT)

Sundar Subramaniam, such backtracking is unheard of in sports. And no further comments!

Kritika Prasad, your cricket knowledge is great! England's away win in Oz as well as their whitewashing of India were both under Flower. India barely reached 300 once in that series. ODI is not true cricket. It's another matter England excelled them at home in that format as well.

Posted by Dravid_Pujara_Gravitas on (October 17, 2011, 17:21 GMT)

@wazza85, I agree with you. SA is a wonderful team and so is Srilanka with the Legends Sanga and Mahela. I don't mean to diss them. I was just mentioning the present and former world champions (2007). India achieved the feat both at home and abroad. Australia didn't achieve that feat as yet. Nothing against SA. So, let us not read toomuch into the mauling that England is being dished out or India's closely contested losses to England in the less than favourable conditions (weather) in the recent England series in ODIs. They are a decent side but not in the league of India and Australia in ODIs. But they can be a handful on any day, provided they do somethings right. They need to bring in the awesome Ian Bell to stand a chance against The Champs. He is a class act. England got it wrong even in the second ODI. I hope Bell gets his rightful place from the 3rd ODI onwards. Otherwise, this series is already getting pretty boring. Can't wait for it to just finish and get over with.

Posted by yug20 on (October 17, 2011, 17:20 GMT)

What a comprehensive 2-0 win..... Cant see this english team doing much here if they can't even send half the side back to the pavillion..... efinately a 5-0 in cards at the end of the series.... only rain can save them now.. hahahhaha....... its becoming a boring series.... can we have ireland playing the next 3 matches??? at least they will give a fight than this english team..hahahahaha

Posted by Bang_La on (October 17, 2011, 16:39 GMT)

@Dravid_Gravitas: "But it is to their credit that they beat World Champs India in the last series, though in some dubious conditions." Oh right! When India loose, its always in some dubious conditions, what a joke! Never metion knee-jerk syndrome and epidemic "injury" when there are fast bowling and bounces on hard pitch, hahahaha.

Posted by Dravid_Pujara_Gravitas on (October 17, 2011, 13:52 GMT)

@5wombats, wonder what the skewed definition of a dead pitch is! Batsmen getting foxed by spin, variable bounce and the straighter ones, assisting spinners is a dead pitch? eh?; it seems. Bad propaganda and misinformation being spread unapologetically. Can't even bat 50 overs on a 'dead' pitch? eh?. Improve your batting skills instead of calling challenging spinning pitches as dead pitches. If these challenging, spinning tracks are 'dead' then why are the nice, monotonous, ball coming onto the bat pitches of England not dead and flat? Once you have a good back foot play, those are the deadest of dead tracks. Isn't it? Just a thought.

Posted by wazza85 on (October 17, 2011, 13:49 GMT)

Dravid_Gravitas, India and Australia are not only the good teams in the word which you make them sound like. SA are a good side or even Sri Lanka they are a champion side too they gave India a run although India won the WC. if a team is to be a real Champion side they should be consistent. thats why Australia was a Champion side for so many years. well India has to prove them selves in the future series.

Posted by wazza85 on (October 17, 2011, 11:39 GMT)

mate, India is a good side at home but away it depends. the only reason they won the WC is home conditions. but they can be defeated away from home. however, they are a good team that has determination.

Posted by Dravid_Pujara_Gravitas on (October 17, 2011, 8:34 GMT)

@ all the members who are flogging England - please understand that England has never been a good ODI side let alone being great. Their record speaks for itself. They haven't won world cup up until now though it was held in their own backyard several times. Got canned 6-1 by a weak Australian side recently. But it is to their credit that they beat World Champs India in the last series, though in some dubious conditions. So, please give credit where it is due. Though they are still a decent side, they are not in the league of World Champs like India or former world champs like Australia; and credit should be given to them for beating us in at least their own backyard and now they are trying to win in the back yard of World Champs. If they can get their team right, they can be a handful on any day. If I were England's Captain, Bell will be my go to man. Always. And what's the matter with you English fans? You guys have nothing to say about the non-inclusion of Bell? Strange!

Posted by   on (October 17, 2011, 8:20 GMT)

@sportsmanspirit. Stop living in past LOL. Ashes is past. And a certain Fletcher who was your *coach* that time is now ours. We can brag about 1983 World Cup, 2007 T20 World Cup, Champions Trophy and 2011 World Cup. Beat that. If you can hang onto one thing, we have many credentials to enlist. And yeah.. jog your memory.. huh.. was the last one at Cardiff, where India scored 306. And yours is not dead pitches, they are *cow grazing meadows*.

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Andrew Miller Andrew Miller was saved from a life of drudgery in the City when his car caught fire on the way to an interview. He took this as a sign and fled to Pakistan where he witnessed England's historic victory in the twilight at Karachi (or thought he did, at any rate - it was too dark to tell). He then joined Wisden Online in 2001, and soon graduated from put-upon photocopier to a writer with a penchant for comment and cricket on the subcontinent. In addition to Pakistan, he has covered England tours in Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, South Africa, Australia and New Zealand, as well as the World Cup in the Caribbean in 2007
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