Spot-fixing controversy November 4, 2011

Team management failed Amir, says mentor

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Mohamamd Amir was a victim of Pakistan's cricketing culture and, specifically, the team management that failed to protect him, his mentor Asif Bajwa has said. Bajwa runs an academy in Rawalpindi that became Amir's second home from the age of 11, where he would live for long stretches with Bajwa looking after him.

"It was the team management's responsibility to take care of him," Bajwa told ESPNcricinfo. "They should have taken a strict stance but the culture is very lenient and unprofessional. Why couldn't they shut out those elements that tempted our cricketers?

"I brought up him up but he was distracted only after entering the international arena, where he didn't find the right people around him. They [the PCB] wanted a cricketer to represent Pakistan - we gave them one. But now who is responsible? Who is to be blame? He was a player with extraordinary cricketing skills but he was very naïve ... the board should have taken care of the other elements."

Bajwa said he had been in contact with Amir during the spot-fixing trial. "My interaction with Amir until Wednesday was very emotional, he sounded helpless and insisted that he wanted one more chance - everyone deserves a second chance. He apologised to me, and I promised him that I'd help him to eventually return to the game. It's a challenge for me to rebuild his reputation, but I will be doing that. It's a challenge to remove a stigma, as our society is very cruel, but I believe he will be back."

On Thursday, Amir was sentenced to six months in a young offenders' detention centre for his role in the spot-fixing case; the rules suggest he can be out in three months' time on good behaviour. His former team-mates Mohammad Asif and Salman Butt, and their agent Mazhar Majeed, were sent to jail for terms ranging from a year to 32 months.

In his remarks while handing out the sentence, Justice Cooke noted Amir's background - he comes from a village near Islamabad where his father was a watchman in a government school. Compared to his fellow convicts, he was found to be unsophisticated, uneducated and impressionable.

"An 18-year-old from a poverty-stricken village background, very different to your own privileged one, who, whilst a very talented bowler, would be inclined to do what his senior players and particularly his captain told him, especially when told there was money in it for him and this was part of the common culture. For an impressionable youngster, not long in the team to stand out against the blandishments of his captain would have been hard," the judge said.

Umar Farooq is ESPNcricinfo's Pakistan correspondent

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • maddy20 on November 6, 2011, 13:23 GMT

    Poor kid. Even though I am not a big fan of Pak cricket team, one has just gotta feel sorry for this guy. Raw talent gone waste.

  • Masud_BITK on November 6, 2011, 10:23 GMT

    I had the same experience, I born in a poor family, gained quick reputation. In this case, I have moral values and respect my parents and family by showing honesty. Why I need more money at this age? I have no hesitation to say that he should be punished and it was a real justice.

  • on November 6, 2011, 6:03 GMT

    I feel really sorry for this guy (i saw his house it was just a small house with the simplest things u can imagine ) i felt so sorry for him with his dad crying and then when iread those comments real pity about the stuff that happened really wish he comes back not pakistan but the world needs a talent like him to be there

  • on November 6, 2011, 4:45 GMT

    What a bowler..What a shame, this guy has the chance to be better than the great Wasim Akram, now he is not even playing cricket anytime soon,

  • on November 5, 2011, 18:55 GMT

    I am an Indian But I really felt sad for Aamir. He is a terrific talent and I would say that the PCB is responsible for this. Hope he will come back soon

  • omarqureshidubai on November 5, 2011, 15:01 GMT

    There hve been instances of ppl giving their own examples,that they are poor but would not do such a thing.To all those who try to relate their economic/social conditions with Amir,.How many of you have been a 17yr old,living in a "village" and in quest of being one of the best bowler while rising to stardom that too at an age when most of you poor/middleclass people are fanticising of movie stars/cricket players!If there is such a person he would seem justified criticising amir for his actions.My ancestoral village is same as amir's, although i have never lived in that village life,my father bein a politician of the area,my interaction with them is immense. These village boys dont have enough exposure to the outside world.A poor civilian living in a city is far more mature compared to one living in a village.Their decision making is weak,easily manipulated and gulliable.You are able to comment online, but there is no internet in my village, heck not even 3phase elect. to supply power.

  • On_me_head_son on November 5, 2011, 13:13 GMT

    As a Pakistani fan it was tough to know that we'd be losing a talent like Amir.There have been mixed reactions/comments regarding his punishment & that's understandable.I for one agree that if you're going to cheat in any shape or form then you cannot expect to get off with a small fine/short ban. Yes he is young,from a poor background etc etc. but that is no excuse. I pray that Insha'Allah he learns from this & if given a second chance he can come back strong. As for Asif & Butt? Well they should NEVER be allowed to play cricket again..Butt wasn't exactly Pakistan's answer to Sachin,Sehwag anyway-so good riddance. Asif was an excellent bowler who like Mcgrath worked out the batsmans weakness & had a fairly consistent line & length. However thats where the similarity ends because Glenn Mcgrath will always be remembered as one of the greats unlike Asif. Just want to say thanks to all the Indian bro's out there who have posted some pretty supportive comments. Sport CAN bring ppl together

  • Haleos on November 5, 2011, 12:53 GMT

    @InnocentGuy - wonderful. I still can not believe the how many people support amir as if he is bowling equivalent of bradman. He hass not even played a year. Within a year he gets ccorrupted. Playing cricket for the country pays enough to live a decent life. All the justifications about being poor and uneducated are ridiculous.

  • Haleos on November 5, 2011, 12:50 GMT

    @Qazi Hassan Farooqi - first of all, I am a middle class person with humble background. If what you say about karachi kids is true, there is even stronger case for amir to be made an example. if he let away easily other poor kids will follow his example. I know lots of poor people who live with dignity and will die of hunger rather than getting bribed. It just shows the upbringing of a person.

  • pakisstan on November 5, 2011, 9:17 GMT

    aamir is a very very very talented bowler in cricket history, i have never seen any one bowling like that he is a class swing both side, very good to see him, i much sad about what he did but he is a human and also human makes mistake every body should forgive him, asif and salman butt.

  • maddy20 on November 6, 2011, 13:23 GMT

    Poor kid. Even though I am not a big fan of Pak cricket team, one has just gotta feel sorry for this guy. Raw talent gone waste.

  • Masud_BITK on November 6, 2011, 10:23 GMT

    I had the same experience, I born in a poor family, gained quick reputation. In this case, I have moral values and respect my parents and family by showing honesty. Why I need more money at this age? I have no hesitation to say that he should be punished and it was a real justice.

  • on November 6, 2011, 6:03 GMT

    I feel really sorry for this guy (i saw his house it was just a small house with the simplest things u can imagine ) i felt so sorry for him with his dad crying and then when iread those comments real pity about the stuff that happened really wish he comes back not pakistan but the world needs a talent like him to be there

  • on November 6, 2011, 4:45 GMT

    What a bowler..What a shame, this guy has the chance to be better than the great Wasim Akram, now he is not even playing cricket anytime soon,

  • on November 5, 2011, 18:55 GMT

    I am an Indian But I really felt sad for Aamir. He is a terrific talent and I would say that the PCB is responsible for this. Hope he will come back soon

  • omarqureshidubai on November 5, 2011, 15:01 GMT

    There hve been instances of ppl giving their own examples,that they are poor but would not do such a thing.To all those who try to relate their economic/social conditions with Amir,.How many of you have been a 17yr old,living in a "village" and in quest of being one of the best bowler while rising to stardom that too at an age when most of you poor/middleclass people are fanticising of movie stars/cricket players!If there is such a person he would seem justified criticising amir for his actions.My ancestoral village is same as amir's, although i have never lived in that village life,my father bein a politician of the area,my interaction with them is immense. These village boys dont have enough exposure to the outside world.A poor civilian living in a city is far more mature compared to one living in a village.Their decision making is weak,easily manipulated and gulliable.You are able to comment online, but there is no internet in my village, heck not even 3phase elect. to supply power.

  • On_me_head_son on November 5, 2011, 13:13 GMT

    As a Pakistani fan it was tough to know that we'd be losing a talent like Amir.There have been mixed reactions/comments regarding his punishment & that's understandable.I for one agree that if you're going to cheat in any shape or form then you cannot expect to get off with a small fine/short ban. Yes he is young,from a poor background etc etc. but that is no excuse. I pray that Insha'Allah he learns from this & if given a second chance he can come back strong. As for Asif & Butt? Well they should NEVER be allowed to play cricket again..Butt wasn't exactly Pakistan's answer to Sachin,Sehwag anyway-so good riddance. Asif was an excellent bowler who like Mcgrath worked out the batsmans weakness & had a fairly consistent line & length. However thats where the similarity ends because Glenn Mcgrath will always be remembered as one of the greats unlike Asif. Just want to say thanks to all the Indian bro's out there who have posted some pretty supportive comments. Sport CAN bring ppl together

  • Haleos on November 5, 2011, 12:53 GMT

    @InnocentGuy - wonderful. I still can not believe the how many people support amir as if he is bowling equivalent of bradman. He hass not even played a year. Within a year he gets ccorrupted. Playing cricket for the country pays enough to live a decent life. All the justifications about being poor and uneducated are ridiculous.

  • Haleos on November 5, 2011, 12:50 GMT

    @Qazi Hassan Farooqi - first of all, I am a middle class person with humble background. If what you say about karachi kids is true, there is even stronger case for amir to be made an example. if he let away easily other poor kids will follow his example. I know lots of poor people who live with dignity and will die of hunger rather than getting bribed. It just shows the upbringing of a person.

  • pakisstan on November 5, 2011, 9:17 GMT

    aamir is a very very very talented bowler in cricket history, i have never seen any one bowling like that he is a class swing both side, very good to see him, i much sad about what he did but he is a human and also human makes mistake every body should forgive him, asif and salman butt.

  • on November 5, 2011, 8:00 GMT

    It's the height of stupidty if Amir or his coach or anyone to say that he was not spoon feeded to stay away from corruption while entering international cricket. Even in schools/colleges, such things are considered crime, be it cricket or any sports. It is not the poverty but it is one's ethics and the way you were brought up which is the deciding factor. If Amir really loved his country, then there is no way he would have involved himself into it. It is purely selfishness and greed at this early age. The judgement is quite fair and was been leniently as well. For those who are sympathizing for such corrupt players (however outstanding), change your way of thinking. In simple terms, what they did is "NOT CRICKET".

  • Crazy4cricket40 on November 5, 2011, 4:51 GMT

    He has committed a sin knowingly that it could end his career and its fact now so he should be punished. 6 months jail will obviously teach him a lesson so he should be back in the side as soon as he finish his punishment. ICC should lift his ban for 5yrs. It will be 1 and 1/2 year anyway by the time he comes out of the jail. BCCI and IPL mgt. is also responsible for this kid and other pak cricketers by not allowing them to play for IPL where they can generate handsome income. Even player like sachin prefers IPl over country coz its huge income. All being said, I m not agree about amir's teen age or innocentness. 18yr old kid knows what is wrong and what is right. Should not have committed this

  • caught_knott_bowled_old on November 5, 2011, 4:47 GMT

    I think the judge has shown very good understanding of Amir's background, age, inexperience and vulnerability. The sentence is fair. Amir, naive and unaware of how the world works will now know how to conduct himself. I am sure if he gets proper guidance and mentoring, he will comeback and live up to his full potential as an exciting fast bowler.

  • on November 5, 2011, 4:44 GMT

    dont think PCB ll do anything for Amir but pakistan's public can do something infavour Amir . I really enjoys watching good bowling of Ambrose ,mc grath , donald , wasim , waqar ,simon jones( injured) vettori ,bond (injury and icl) , steyn and finally Amir(banned ). Eventhough i am from india . i can easily say Amir > any indian bowlers . Amir easily swings the ball in 145 km/hr + .

  • on November 5, 2011, 4:40 GMT

    pinto are u crazyyy no way Asif should be brought back... salman and asif should be life time banned... Asif has commited a crime for the second time and u want him to be back as soon as possible to ruin pakistan's reputation once again... Only Aamir deserves to be back after serving his full ban... Asif and salman butt are just harmfull members for the team please never bring them back!!!

  • serenitynow on November 5, 2011, 3:15 GMT

    There is no disagreement that Ameer should be punished for his act which is unforgivable. Throughout this whole episode, the heart wished to see him again in match bowling to Sachin Tendulkar.

  • pintu01 on November 5, 2011, 2:46 GMT

    Salman Butt should have been banned for life. He is the main culprit who was showing polished image in the court. He pursued, manipulated and forced Asif and naive Amir for the crimes. PCB shouldn't include Salman in the Pakistan team when his ban is over. Asif and Amir should be in the team as soon as their bans and punishments are over.

  • on November 4, 2011, 19:36 GMT

    Well, I believe Muhammad Amir has learned his lessons the hard way, I am confident that he will not repeat the same mistake again. There is punishment for each crime/sin, if he goes through and completes the punishment process/duration (s) then we should all welcome him back..........He made a mistake, he admitted it and now he is facing the consequences........and that is the end of that chapter and start of a new chapter (unless until same mistake is repeated).

    He alone is not to be blamed, there will be a huge chain downwards (my hypothesis) especially PCB should take strict actions and put his house in order and make all decisions on merit.

  • on November 4, 2011, 19:26 GMT

    being a teenage is not an excuse, the guy is playing international cricket. no excuses. should have been given more punishment to all cheaters.

  • the_blue_android on November 4, 2011, 19:23 GMT

    I hope the ICC is a little lenient on Amir and reduces the ban on him because cricket desperately needs this kind of talent. My heart aches every time I see footage of him bowling. Asif has been given plenty of chances but this is Amir's first screw-up. He could have been the greatest fast bowler the world has ever seen. I know people may think of this as an exaggeration but how many fast bowlers have troubled Ricky Ponting with pitching it short? How many bowlers have been able to bowl inswing, outswing, reverse swing and yorkers at 140-145 kmph and all this at the age of 18? - A fan from India.

  • nickydude on November 4, 2011, 18:57 GMT

    I still do not've any sympathies for Amir. He or his lawyer were canny enough to quickly understand & ditch the sinking ship & turn approver. Just look at the pic when he was caught last yr & were being taken to the court immediately next day, he was smiling, he was overconfident & knew nuttin will happen. Correct me, if Im wrong if there was any genuine remorse, it wud've happened immediately, not after a yr, when the walls close on you.. Nikhil

  • InnocentGuy on November 4, 2011, 18:45 GMT

    contd.. Amir is definitely old enough to realize that. He is impressionable alright, but that doesn't excuse him from playing fair. It does not, because it isn't fair to the other players who put in honest performances but don't always get rewarded appropriately. And society cannot afford to tolerate it because of the effect it will have on itself otherwise. That is why it is okay to punish him appropriately and when he has corrected himself, give a second chance for him to prove it. What constitutes an appropriate punishment is up to the operators of the judicial system to decide. Personally, I hope this has set a sound example and I sincerely hope that Amir gets to play again sooner than later. - an avid cricket (Indian) fan.

  • InnocentGuy on November 4, 2011, 18:36 GMT

    A justice system exists to maintain law and order in society. It's ultimate goal is to make living in society easier and better. It is built on generations of fundamental human values. Part of those values is giving fellow human beings another chance to mend their ways. If a 10-year old steals mangoes from the neighbor's tree, you don't prohibit him from ever going near mangoes in his life. Instead you punish him appropriately and give him another chance to prove that he has learned his lesson. The punishment differs based on the perceived effect/magnitude of the crime. In Amir's case, it is definitely not akin to stealing mangoes but something of a very large scale. Not in terms of the benefit he potentially gets out of committing this crime, but the effect it would have had on other budding youngsters had he not been caught. Knowing what is right and wrong as society defines it has nothing to do with education or wealth. Stealing is wrong no matter how rich or poor you are.

  • _Oracle_ on November 4, 2011, 18:30 GMT

    It is unfrortunate in Ameer's case. I agree, as a teenager, you are kind of stupid. I remember the days I used to think, I knew everything and I could do no wrong. However, I remember that I clearly knew what was right and what was wrong. He must have known that getting caught would/could end his career. If he didn't he isn't very sharp at all. Anyways, I blame PCB and the culture in the dressing room more than Ameer.

  • hassan13 on November 4, 2011, 17:57 GMT

    I just feel sad for him. Name me someone who has not made a mistake at 18. He has confessed and asked for his forgiveness. He should do his term and after the 5 year ban if he is good enough than i dont see why he cant comeback. He will have paid his dues to the cricket fraternity.

  • on November 4, 2011, 17:52 GMT

    I played against asif bajwa's club a week ago and there is a bowler just like amir he is training who had me caught behind for a duck, he says he is a replacement of amir though he is very young at the moment and i bet he can still bowl at 120kmph...

  • on November 4, 2011, 17:22 GMT

    Apart from culture, it shouldnt be ignored that he is not mature enough. He is a *teeenager*. His thoughts are not mature, he comes from a different background.He has no know how of how to dress up even. He is in the age when teenagers are learning from their elders, their mentors, their idols.

    And for those who are yelling at Amir's act, think once, havent they ever misused someone's trust even in mature years of their life?

    He made a mistake indeed...but should be given a second chance

  • on November 4, 2011, 17:16 GMT

    This is a pity - the kind of talent that world cricket is missing.

    Amir - a Wasim Akram like talent - seen once in decades will never be that anymore. Asif - A Mcgrath like talent - (granted, his priorities were pretty different from those of Glenn)

    Hopefully this will serve as a warning for future talent from Pakistan and the world over.

    And like everyone else here, I feel Amir will make it back strong. This kid deserves a second chance. And good on him for pleading guilty. It is just the right thing to do.

  • on November 4, 2011, 16:42 GMT

    @Haleos: "When you are 18 u have enough brains to understand what is right and wrong." Just because you are an English-educated upper-middle-class city-boy, you should not think an uneducated teen son of a rural school chowkidar should be smart like you were in your teens. When I was in Karachi, I used to see many young ones coming from poverty stricken villages, and they all behaved like Amir.

  • on November 4, 2011, 16:27 GMT

    This is a pity - the kind of talent that world cricket is missing.

    Amir - a Wasim Akram like talent - seen once in decades will never be that anymore. Asif - A Mcgrath like talent - (granted, his priorities were pretty different from those of Glenn)

    Hopefully this will serve as a warning for future talent from Pakistan and the world over.

    And like everyone else here, I feel Amir will make it back strong. This kid deserves a second chance. And good on him for pleading guilty. It is just the right thing to do.

  • on November 4, 2011, 16:24 GMT

    there should be no second chance when you sell out your country.

  • wrenx on November 4, 2011, 16:17 GMT

    As much as a remorseful talent like Amir deserves a second chance, I think it's wishful to think it will ever happen. This affair will taint him for life, and he'll never be able to shake it off. As far as cricket goes, this is probably it for Amir.

  • ultimatewarrior on November 4, 2011, 16:01 GMT

    Looking at people's reaction I am bit surprised, some people are saying he should not be jailed because of his background and young age, why not you all people apply this to your personal lives, why you hand over a teenage poor thieve to police when he try to theft money of yours.......why nos. of poor people jailed.....judge had already taken all considerations very well and give him just 6 months sentence in comparison to up to 32 month jail to others....i too had sympathy with him, but didn't want to leave him without sentence.....i wish he come from jail as an improved personality and a good human being and break so many record that he later be remember by his good deeds not by crime he made....

  • Desihungama on November 4, 2011, 15:50 GMT

    I am not sure Aamir will ever be able to match his past performances. I don' think he is mentally tough enough. Not just that, the society around him is cruel and unforgiving. He is going to get heckled and that will be his undoing. So sad. It's also heartening to see Indian Support for Aamir. That goes to show a true Cricket fan is above petty politics and barriers.

  • Deepfreezed on November 4, 2011, 15:29 GMT

    This is injustice at its finest. We hear about rich business men cheating people out of their money everyday. They swindle millions of $ but spends no time in jail. This poor kid have to give up his career because someone wanted to make an example out of it. Like Amir requested, a second chance would have been nice. But he now have to spend time in jail.

  • bharath74 on November 4, 2011, 15:28 GMT

    asif bajwa, u r doing gr8 job

  • on November 4, 2011, 15:28 GMT

    I also believe that he will be back. Every one makes mistakes and he is paying for that. The society will accept him again.

  • chapathishot on November 4, 2011, 15:28 GMT

    Even though I am an Indian ,I always liked the Pakistan Cricket team ,even when they were beating us black and blue.What ever said and done class difference is far more evident in Pakistan and Amir is one of the victims of that .Somebody coming from a humble background trying to make it big in life and that too at a young age is always influenced by the culture in the dressing room.When some body like a butt who comes from an educated higher class background does that then how can a guy like amir withhold from it.If you see the details clearly ,he was paid only 2500GBP for that when all others made many times more that also says that he was not aware of the benefit earned by others of the No balls.But a very good lesson to youngsters all over the world .As said by his coach it will be very difficult for him to make a come back as our part of the world never forgets or forgives these sort of deeds

  • dmqi on November 4, 2011, 15:26 GMT

    5 year ban from ICC for a 19 year old boy is the biggest joke. It was ICC and specially the Pakistan cricket board and management who should also pay the price for not been able to protect these young talents. Why not past PCB chairman and his staff put to trial? Salman Butt and probably Asif should serve in jail and have the full sentence but not Amir. Cricket lovers should see that fellow in action sooner than later. After 6 months jail term he should be back to the play ground for the spectators.

    @Haleos. poverty is not license to cheating, it is the so called honest rich that make millions poor by sucking their blood. Do you see wall st protest in USA? It was the money making bookies who created the problems through the captain. Why don't you stop them? Behind every fortune, there is a crime. You do not see those criminals. You see the crime of a young boy and many big names in cricket have done that crime with no punishment.

  • bharath74 on November 4, 2011, 15:26 GMT

    He definitely deserves second chance,it is gud that this episode happened when he is 18, hope he has learned a lesson.

  • on November 4, 2011, 15:25 GMT

    Amir shld deserve 2nd chance . i thght he ll end up stats like wasim akram while retiring . i really wanna see amir vs indian team but...

  • on November 4, 2011, 15:17 GMT

    I hope Amir can play again,if not Pak then any other club or county. He was an incredible talent. My heart goes out to his talent. But then what he has done is also very humiliating and stupid. Thought the judge was too soft with him. Only 6 months is not enough. Especially after he pleaded guilty. So what if he is just 18. At 18 you are allowed to vote and choose you government. So what if his captain told him to do it. Would he rob a bank if his captain told him to? So what he was poor and came from a village? Does it give him authority to commit crimes?

  • madhav_cric on November 4, 2011, 15:14 GMT

    Haleos is right. No need to treat him like a kid and just leave him. He already got very less jail term.

  • madhav_cric on November 4, 2011, 15:05 GMT

    Amir is not a kid to be protected. He should be sent to a rehabilitation center and also to a psychiatrist if people feels that he should be always protected by management. Then he should be allowed to play cricket.

  • agsn on November 4, 2011, 15:04 GMT

    As much as the situation is regrettable for this kid. This is not backyard cricket for chances to be given to any one. There are more than enough players in a country to are a place in 15 players in the national team. What justification are you going to use to select Amir over any one else? Amir should never play international cricket again, The best second chance he should have is to be allowed to play local cricket, and that's it. After stooping to this level he should not even be thinking of returning to cricket and just focus on some other profession. We should stop this talk of possible second chances around this kid, he will just ruin his life waiting for it. Its time for him to look to something else.

  • Nutcutlet on November 4, 2011, 15:02 GMT

    I echo the sentiment expressed by Peterincanada wholeheartedly. I can only hope that he is well-treated in the youth offenders' detention centre, makes progress in discovering who he really is and comes out as a man who understands that the mark of being an adult is taking responsibility for one's decisions and actions. His is a rare talent indeed and the world of cicket can ill afford to lose him. I sincerely hope that the best of Amir, as a cricketer and more importantly, as a man, is yet to come. Any right-thinking person would want to give him a chance to atone for his transgressions. The same indulgence cannot, however, be extended to his cynical and erstwhile captain who was, as his line manager, very largely responsible for bringing down the unfortunate Amir.

  • risky on November 4, 2011, 14:47 GMT

    This is a very good decision, but I firmly believe that Amir should get a 2nd chance. He is a good child. ICC should also help him to get back in the cricket field for the sake of cricket. True cricket lovers want to see a very talented & exciting young bowler back at the field. ICC should forgive him & the ban should be reduced from 5 to 2 years. I hope he have learnt a lot now. He will be a changed man. I can understand his situation. All my heartly wishes r with him.

  • on November 4, 2011, 14:44 GMT

    VERY SAD STORY FOR YOUNG TALENT.

  • on November 4, 2011, 14:43 GMT

    How can than ICC defend 5 years ban on Amir ?? PCB should help to get second chance and Amir should be back in 1 years time.

    "An 18-year-old from a poverty-stricken village background, very different to your own privileged one, who, whilst a very talented bowler, would be inclined to do what his senior players and particularly his captain told him, especially when told there was money in it for him and this was part of the common culture. For an impressionable youngster, not long in the team to stand out against the blandishments of his captain would have been hard," the judge said.

  • Peterincanada on November 4, 2011, 14:34 GMT

    I have to agree with Bajwa. An unsophisticated 18 year old sent to a foreign country deserved better from his support system. He deserves his sentence but also deserves a second chance lest this becomes a real human tragedy. I wish him well.

  • Sakthiivel on November 4, 2011, 14:27 GMT

    God save these cricketing talents from these kind of useless cricket boards

  • on November 4, 2011, 14:14 GMT

    these are just the reactions. We do not want him back Pakistan is Filled with more then Talented players then amir.

  • on November 4, 2011, 14:09 GMT

    haile sellassie I blesss this youth

  • Haleos on November 4, 2011, 14:05 GMT

    Everyone is treating him like an innocent kid. When you are 18 u have enough brains to understand what is right and wrong. If poverty is a license to do wrong than every poor will start robbing and cheating. But there are millions of poor and hungry who dont cheat and live a honest life. He should have been punished more. Nonsense judgement of putting him in detention rather than jail. Accepting guilt should not reduce the sentence.

  • on November 4, 2011, 13:56 GMT

    Amir should have been given probation instead of six months jail term. Poor young guy succumbed to pressure.

  • on November 4, 2011, 13:51 GMT

    I hope he is given a second chance

  • InnocentGuy on November 4, 2011, 13:49 GMT

    Amir learned a good lesson at a very young age (hope he's truly learned a lesson). He is only banned for 5 years. Of which 1 year is almost over. So he'll still be pretty young when he gets out, around 23-24 I think. And with his talent, I'm sure it won't be long before he has some good domestic performances to get called back into the national team. I think he will be bowling for Pakistan again by the time he is 26-27. For players with talent like his, even 5 years in the national side can be spectacular because of consistent high quality performances. He took 50 Test wickets in no time. Plus he is a great batsman too. I'm sure he'll reach at least 300 Test wickets before he calls it a day.

  • on November 4, 2011, 13:41 GMT

    The Example is set. New comers should learn from this.

  • Karthik_CricketFan on November 4, 2011, 13:41 GMT

    Very good article by Umar. :) But this incident is a very important event in the history of cricket. I have a feeling this is just the tip of the iceberg.

  • on November 4, 2011, 13:39 GMT

    I would like to see Mohammad Amir to come back to cricket.. He is a talented cricketer and would love to see him in action again.. I agree with judge's comments and Amir would have learnt a hard lesson..

  • on November 4, 2011, 13:33 GMT

    It is just so sad. That sort of talent, wasted and abused by PCB. You need quite a bit of heart and dedication to survive with the PCB, Amir fell victim so early.

  • on November 4, 2011, 13:23 GMT

    first word of the article is spelt wrong.......

  • Mangwap on November 4, 2011, 13:23 GMT

    What an incomprehensible load of rubbish these statements are. Whether or not he is poor or comes from a village or blah blah blah, the fact remains that he made a choice to do something he knew was wrong. Action-consequence.

  • on November 4, 2011, 13:23 GMT

    I hope a day comes when Aamir will be back after learning his lesson. I for one will wait for his comeback.

  • SachinForever1991 on November 4, 2011, 13:16 GMT

    ICC should lift ban now.. months in jail is enough!

  • SongBillong on November 4, 2011, 13:03 GMT

    Yes,Amir did lots of wrong and he deserves to be punished. The judge has been pretty lenient on him and he'll come out in three months which is a very good thing..I have been watching cricket closely as an Indian fan for almost twenty five years and i can tell you,this guy is easily the most talented fast bowler the world has ever seen. I hope when he gets out quickly,learns his lesson,works and trains hard to eventually make a comeback aged 24. I am hundred percent sure this guy was forced to do it and he didn't do it for all that money either. The two real fixers should have been handed a lifetime ban. MR ASIF BAJWA,help this guy get back..It would be extremely unfortunate for the world cricket to lose this guy who has given it his all to play cricket..

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  • SongBillong on November 4, 2011, 13:03 GMT

    Yes,Amir did lots of wrong and he deserves to be punished. The judge has been pretty lenient on him and he'll come out in three months which is a very good thing..I have been watching cricket closely as an Indian fan for almost twenty five years and i can tell you,this guy is easily the most talented fast bowler the world has ever seen. I hope when he gets out quickly,learns his lesson,works and trains hard to eventually make a comeback aged 24. I am hundred percent sure this guy was forced to do it and he didn't do it for all that money either. The two real fixers should have been handed a lifetime ban. MR ASIF BAJWA,help this guy get back..It would be extremely unfortunate for the world cricket to lose this guy who has given it his all to play cricket..

  • SachinForever1991 on November 4, 2011, 13:16 GMT

    ICC should lift ban now.. months in jail is enough!

  • on November 4, 2011, 13:23 GMT

    I hope a day comes when Aamir will be back after learning his lesson. I for one will wait for his comeback.

  • Mangwap on November 4, 2011, 13:23 GMT

    What an incomprehensible load of rubbish these statements are. Whether or not he is poor or comes from a village or blah blah blah, the fact remains that he made a choice to do something he knew was wrong. Action-consequence.

  • on November 4, 2011, 13:23 GMT

    first word of the article is spelt wrong.......

  • on November 4, 2011, 13:33 GMT

    It is just so sad. That sort of talent, wasted and abused by PCB. You need quite a bit of heart and dedication to survive with the PCB, Amir fell victim so early.

  • on November 4, 2011, 13:39 GMT

    I would like to see Mohammad Amir to come back to cricket.. He is a talented cricketer and would love to see him in action again.. I agree with judge's comments and Amir would have learnt a hard lesson..

  • Karthik_CricketFan on November 4, 2011, 13:41 GMT

    Very good article by Umar. :) But this incident is a very important event in the history of cricket. I have a feeling this is just the tip of the iceberg.

  • on November 4, 2011, 13:41 GMT

    The Example is set. New comers should learn from this.

  • InnocentGuy on November 4, 2011, 13:49 GMT

    Amir learned a good lesson at a very young age (hope he's truly learned a lesson). He is only banned for 5 years. Of which 1 year is almost over. So he'll still be pretty young when he gets out, around 23-24 I think. And with his talent, I'm sure it won't be long before he has some good domestic performances to get called back into the national team. I think he will be bowling for Pakistan again by the time he is 26-27. For players with talent like his, even 5 years in the national side can be spectacular because of consistent high quality performances. He took 50 Test wickets in no time. Plus he is a great batsman too. I'm sure he'll reach at least 300 Test wickets before he calls it a day.