Corruption in cricket

Cricket's biggest match-fixing scandal was unearthed in 2000, when Hansie Cronje admitted he had accepted money to throw matches. Soon players from other countries were implicated, among them Mohammad Azharuddin and Saleem Malik. Since then, allegations of fixing - including the new phenomenon of spot-fixing - have cropped up sporadically, and it has been acknowledged that bookmakers and the underworld have been active in trying to influence cricket results and specific moments in play. In 2010, scandal reared its head again when three leading Pakistan players were questioned by Scotland Yard and suspended by the ICC over spot-fixing charges.

Sreesanth ahead of his departure for court

India news

Kundra set for Rajasthan Royals exit

The ownership structure of Rajasthan Royals is set to change after Raj Kundra, the co-owner whose involvement in the IPL corruption scandal has been established, decided to offload his stake in the franchise

Sreesanth ahead of his departure for court

India news

India Cements shareholders to get CSK shares

The board of India Cements, the company which owns Chennai Super Kings, has approved the transfer of ownership rights to the franchise to its newly formed subsidiary, Chennai Super Kings Cricket Ltd

Corruption in the IPL

What after the 'innocent megalomaniac'?

Ashok Malik, in the Deccan Chronicle, says that the end of the Srinivasan era offers a chance to chart a new course and professionalise the BCCI

Sreesanth ahead of his departure for court

Corruption in the IPL

'My name keeps popping up' - Dhoni

India ODI captain MS Dhoni has expressed indignation over how his name keeps popping up in controversies around Indian cricket

Sreesanth ahead of his departure for court

Corruption in the IPL

BCCI members look to BJP for next step

Twenty-four hours after receiving the biggest blow from the nation's apex court, BCCI members have put the ball in the court of the Bharatiya Janata Party, the principal ruling party in India

Sreesanth ahead of his departure for court

Corruption in the IPL

BCCI has lost privilege cover, say lawyers

The Supreme Court's decision to open the BCCI to judicial scrutiny under Article 226 of the Constitution has implications that go beyond the cricket field and into the boardroom, potentially influencing the way the sport will henceforth be run