Technology in cricket

For a game as steeped in tradition as cricket is, the question of how much to rely on technology is a perennial - and is now becoming increasingly complex. The Decision Review System has been controversial since it was first put in place

Joe Root's use of the DRS couldn't save him

When entertainment becomes intrusion

Broadcasters' desire to get in players' heads for the sake of good TV is beginning to affect game play

Joe Root's use of the DRS couldn't save him

Anatomy of the Lyon howler

A behind-the-scenes look at one of the more controversial DRS calls of recent times underlines the need for umpires to work closely with the providers of the technology involved

Joe Root's use of the DRS couldn't save him

Serious flaws in DRS indicate need for overhaul

Players gamble on reviews as a tactic, which negates the system's essential purpose - of eliminating howlers. And then there's the issue of who controls it

Joe Root's use of the DRS couldn't save him

Decision Review System

A broadcaster's view on DRS

Senior broadcast professional Hemant Buch writes about the issues with the Decision Review System, but feels it is good for the game as long as it is supported by better protocols

Joe Root's use of the DRS couldn't save him

How simple is spotting a no-ball?

Hardly: bowling actions, and the circumstances of the job, make it difficult for the umpire to detect whether the bowler has overstepped

Joe Root's use of the DRS couldn't save him

Why ball-tracking can't be trusted

In the absence of information on how the technology works, it's hard for some of us to shake doubts about why what we're seeing with our eyes differs significantly from the reading of a computer

Joe Root's use of the DRS couldn't save him

Non-neutral umpires? No thanks

It might seem like there isn't a need for "independent" umpires these days, but imagine the outrage if a home umpire appears guilty of favouritism