Ball-tampering

Players are barred, by Law 42.3, from rubbing the ball on the ground, interfering with its seam or surface, or using any implement that can alter the condition of the ball to thereby gain unfair advantage. There have been plenty of ugly incidents centring on accusations of ball-tampering through cricket's history: the John Lever "Vaseline" affair in 1976-77; the times England and New Zealand accused Pakistan of it in the early 1990s; Michael Atherton's admission that he used dirt to treat the ball against South Africa in 1994; and perhaps most infamously, the Oval Test of 2006 when Pakistan forfeited the match because they were accused of having tampered with the ball.

Darrell Hair takes a close look at the ball

West Indies v Sri Lanka, 2nd Test, Gros Islet, 4th day

Chandimal pleads not guilty to ball-tampering charge

By not pleading guilty to the charge laid by the ICC, Chandimal will attend a hearing by match referee Javagal Srinath after the conclusion of the Test

Darrell Hair takes a close look at the ball

'I don't think Warner and Smith will be discarded'

Wade Gilbert, an authority on coaching who has worked with the All Blacks and Melbourne Storm, talks about what Cricket Australia need to do in the wake of the tampering scandal