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Umar Akmal's limited-overs exploits

The ability to play strokes all round the wicket against different types of bowlers makes him a high-value player in T20s and ODIs

S Rajesh

March 28, 2014

Comments: 43 | Text size: A | A

Umar Akmal guides one on the off side, Pakistan v South Africa, 1st T20I, Dubai, November 13, 2013
In terms of numbers Umar Akmal's ODI performances at Nos. 5 and 6 compare favourably with some of the best in the world © AFP
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Players/Officials: Umar Akmal
Series/Tournaments: World T20
Teams: Pakistan

In his first four innings in Test cricket, Umar Akmal notched up scores of 129, 75, 46 and 52; in his second and third innings in ODIs, he scored 66 and 102 not out, both at faster than a run a ball; in his debut innings in Twenty20 internationals he made 30 off 20, and then followed that with 56 not out off 49 in his third innings. Akmal has taken quickly to whatever format he has played, and his proclivity for strokeplay and scoring quickly has shone through in each of the formats: three of his first four innings in Tests came at a strike rate of more than 80.

He hasn't always done justice to his immense talent in Tests, though: since his debut in November 2009, Akmal has played only 16 Tests at an average of 35.82, and hasn't added to his tally of hundreds since that debut innings. During this period, he has missed 24 out of 40 Tests that Pakistan have played.

However, there's little doubt that he is an immense force in the shorter formats. He has a wide range of strokes, is a busy runner between the wickets, is willing to play his shots from the start, and is fearless and loves the big occasion. Since making his ODI debut in August 2009, he has played 94 out of Pakistan's 118, missing only 24, which shows he is far more integral to Pakistan's plans in that format. Similarly in T20Is, where he has played 54 out of Pakistan's 56 matches since his debut.

In both these formats, he has excellent numbers. As an ODI player he averages more than 38 at a strike rate of 87; in T20I, he averages almost 30 at a strike rate touching 123. His penchant for the big stage was most recently reflected in the World Twenty20 game against Australia in Mirpur, when he scored a scintillating 94 off 54 balls, an effort that won him the Man-of-the-Match award. That lifted his average in World Twenty20 games to 50.87 from 14 matches, at a strike rate of 137.50. His three half-centuries in these matches have come against Australia (twice) and South Africa, and two of those efforts have won him the match awards.

Umar Akmal in limited-overs formats
  Inngs Runs Average Strike rate 100s/ 50s
ODIs 83 2623 38.57 87.08 2/ 19
T20Is 51 1220 29.04 122.86 0/ 6

In ODIs, Akmal has done a fantastic job in the difficult positions of Nos. 5 and 6. These are positions in which batsmen either come in early with the team in trouble, or in the second half of the innings with the team requiring quick runs. Akmal has two centuries at No. 6 in ODIs, a record he shares with three others - Chris Cairns, Kieron Pollard and Shahid Afridi. Those three, though, average in the 20s at No. 6, suggesting that their hundreds were rare flashes of brilliance in what's otherwise been cameo-filled performances at No. 6. Akmal averages 42.13 at that slot, at a strike rate touching 90.

Among batsmen who have scored at least 2000 ODI runs at Nos. 5 and 6, Akmal's average of 40 and strike rate of 86 puts him among a rare bracket of batsmen who have scored quickly, and made lots of runs per dismissal, at those positions. Multiplying the average by the runs scored per ball, Akmal gets an index score of 34.59; only five batsmen in the 2000-run bracket have a better score than that, and they are all high-class players in those positions. In fact, his score is even marginally more than that of Misbah-ul-Haq, who has also been a legend at bailing Pakistan out from difficult positions.

Akmal's strike rate of 86.47 is also particularly impressive given that Pakistan often play in the UAE, where conditions are often difficult for quick run-scoring. In matches involving Akmal, the average strike rate is 76.18, which means he does about 13.5% better than the average batsman in these matches. In matches involving MS Dhoni, who has a similar strike rate, the average is 84.15, while it's 81.03 for Yuvraj Singh and 80.22 for Michael Hussey. That suggests that while these batsmen score at a rate similar to Akmal, they do so in conditions which are generally easier for quick-scoring that those matches involving Akmal.

Top ODI batsmen at No. 5 and 6 (Qual: 2000 runs)
Batsman Innings Runs Average Strike rate 100s/ 50s Ave x SR/100
MS Dhoni 147 5182 49.82 85.09 4/ 33 42.39
Andrew Symonds 114 3970 44.11 92.97 6/ 25 41.01
Michael Bevan 120 4171 51.49 76.82 3/ 28 39.55
Eoin Morgan 77 2526 42.10 92.93 5/ 15 39.12
Michael Hussey 105 3486 42.00 86.78 2/ 23 36.45
Umar Akmal 74 2480 40.00 86.47 2/ 19 34.59
Misbah-ul-Haq 83 2809 44.58 77.19 0/ 22 34.41
Rahul Dravid 82 2765 44.59 75.48 2/ 23 33.66
Hansie Cronje 88 2686 41.32 81.09 0/ 18 33.51
Yuvraj Singh 150 4825 38.60 86.31 7/ 33 33.52

Among Pakistan batsmen at these positions, Akmal is a star, with the highest index score, marginally better than that of Misbah. The others who have scored 2000-plus runs all have index scores of less than 30, including Inzamam-ul-Haq, whose score is 29.28. In the matches Inzamam played, the average match strike rate was 71.69, which means he was about 6.7% better than average, compared with Akmal's 13.5%. All the others, including Younis Khan, Mohammad Yousuf, Imran Khan and Saleem Malik, have scores in the mid-20s.

Pakistan's top ODI batsmen at Nos. 5 and 6 (Qual: 2000 runs)
Batsman Inngs Runs Average Strike rate 100s/ 50s Ave x SR/100
Umar Akmal 74 2480 40.00 86.47 2/ 19 34.59
Misbah-ul-Haq 83 2809 44.58 77.19 0/ 22 34.41
Inzamam-ul-Haq 125 3905 38.28 76.49 0/ 28 29.28
Younis Khan 79 2255 34.16 79.12 0/ 16 27.03
Mohammad Yousuf 101 3078 34.97 73.99 3/ 18 25.87
Imran Khan 105 2717 34.39 74.43 1/ 15 25.60
Saleem Malik 122 3096 30.05 80.56 0/ 20 24.21
Shoaib Malik 93 2354 28.36 82.25 0/ 16 23.33

One of the aspects that makes Akmal formidable is his proficiency against both pace and spin - he averages 38.44, and scores at a run rate of 5.42 runs per over against pace and medium pace, and 41.91 at a run rate of 4.92 against spin, suggesting that he doesn't have any significant weakness in terms of his ability to score against different types of bowlers. Left-arm spin isn't his favourite bowling type, but then you'd expect that for several right-hand batsmen.

Not yet 24, Akmal still has plenty of time to make a serious impression as a Test player as well, given that he has immense ability, and can play off both front and back foot. Right now, though, opposition bowlers would be plotting ways to get him out, given that he is Pakistan's most complete batsman in their current World Twenty20 squad.

Umar Akmal v different types of bowling in ODIs
Bowler type Dismissals Average Run rate
Right-arm spin 13 50.15 5.13
Left-arm pace 4 43.75 4.66
Right-arm pace 39 37.89 5.53
Left-arm spin 10 31.20 4.54

S Rajesh is stats editor of ESPNcricinfo. Follow him on Twitter

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Posted by   on (April 1, 2014, 20:54 GMT)

@ Khans_word! You're person i heard so far, as saying a lot of comparison has been made with him and Kohli. Virat Kohli is and was unmatchable from his coming up years to present.

Posted by   on (March 31, 2014, 17:08 GMT)

Brilliant player but can be impatient and throws away his wicket.

Posted by   on (March 29, 2014, 23:02 GMT)

send these stats to misbah and let him know that stop wasting real talent

Posted by   on (March 29, 2014, 12:07 GMT)

I agree with fezz's conclusions

Posted by Khans_word on (March 29, 2014, 10:10 GMT)

Undoubtable he is an immense talent. A lot of comparisons have been made with Umar Akmal and Kohli over the past few years. Both players are the best young talented batsmen to step of Asia. The difference has always been temperment. I think that Kohli has been lucky as when he started in the Indian team it was choc full of great batsman like Tendulkar, Dravid, Laxman, Sehwag and Dhoni who have undoubtably helped shape him into the finished article. Umar Akmal came to a team bereft of top batsman with maybe Younis Khan and Misbah as mentors. He was also a lot more immature than Kohli in his earlier days and him being kept out the team was for him to reflect on planning his innings and not going totally gun-ho! I think his impending nuptials may just signify a maturing we have been waiting for. Hope to see more mammoth displays in the future!

Posted by Fezz on (March 29, 2014, 8:53 GMT)

If the management just let him play his natural game (as in the last T20) he would perform much better. No point telling a natural stroke player to block the first 40 balls, as this makes him double minded and affects his game. Yes, 2 out of 5 times he would get out cheaply, but other 3 times, he would take the game away from the opposition in a few overs. Just like Asia Cup match against SL, or T20 recent match against Aus.

Posted by Fezz on (March 29, 2014, 8:46 GMT)

@ Umar Riaz ! Agree with u 100 %. I U.Akmal was not being utilized as a wicket keeper, Misbah would have dropped him from ODIs as well and nearly finished his career. MIsbah's problem is that Umar is an aggressive player, and Misbah only wants blockers in his side from no. 1 to no. 6. because all Misbah thinks is defence, defence, defence ! Look at Nasir Jamshed as another example. He is an attacking opener by nature, but he was always told to block first 10 overs, which is not his natural game, and hence his career suffered and now he is out of the team.

Posted by   on (March 29, 2014, 7:08 GMT)

Umar Akmal is no dout is Pakistan's best talent and have all the ability to become the world's best if he constrate just a little more. As for as the issue of his position is concern i think team managment infact handled it realy good. As record shows that his average at this position is higher than his carear average, that also shows that actualy at other positions he is not as good so i sugest that team managment is actualy right by bringing him at this position.

Posted by Waqs77 on (March 29, 2014, 6:11 GMT)

I'm saying it since long that he's a ready made no. 3 player Pakistan got in both limited over games as he plays pace n spin equally good with wide range of shots in his bag. He is having that aggression and keeps score bored busy which requires from a no. 3 player. But never been given a chance at that position.

Posted by mk49_van on (March 29, 2014, 4:08 GMT)

Umar Akmal - could have won the WC 2011 for Pak - but his head got turned after a couple of 6s and Bhajji did the rest. He will probably never get that chance again. A has-been forever.

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S Rajesh Stats editor Every week the Numbers Game takes a look at the story behind the stats, with an original slant on facts and figures. The column is edited by S Rajesh, ESPNcricinfo's stats editor in Bangalore. He did an MBA in marketing, and then worked for a year in advertising, before deciding to chuck it in favour of a job which would combine the pleasures of watching cricket and writing about it. The intense office cricket matches were an added bonus.

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