New Zealand v Pakistan 2nd Twenty20, Hamilton December 28, 2010

Nathan McCullum stars in series win

New Zealand 185 for 7 (Guptill 44, Franklin 40, Ajmal 3-35) beat Pakistan 146 for 9 (Hafeez 46, McCullum 4-16) by 39 runs
Scorecard and ball-by-ball details

New Zealand performances have often been noted for being greater than the sum of their parts, and all the parts were on display at Seddon Park, where the hosts sealed the series with a dominant all-round display. Martin Guptill, James Franklin, Scott Styris and Ross Taylor all contributed with the bat, but Peter McGlashan stole the show with a 10-ball 26 that featured some scintillating stroke play. Nathan McCullum then produced a tight spell to asphyxiate the Pakistan chase, with support from Luke Woodcock, and he finished with 4 for 16. Kyle Mills, Tim Southee and Ian Butler were also among the wickets as Pakistan fell 39 runs short of New Zealand's 185.

Pakistan were in no mood to wait as Mohammad Hafeez lofted Franklin over cover for four off the first ball of the innings before hitting him over square leg two balls later - this time for six. Kyle Mills was welcomed into the attack with two sixes, but took the wicket of Shahid Afridi as the batsman made room, only to watch his middle stump cartwheel after missing a slower full toss.

Hafeez wasn't about to ease up, though, finding boundaries with regularity and scampering between the wickets with Ahmed Shehzad, as they stayed in touch with the required-rate with. They rode their luck too: Ross Taylor dropped a sitter off Hafeez on 44, and aerial mis-hits found their way into vacant areas more than once.

Shehzad was dismissed attempting an ambitious inside-out wallop, as Styris ran around the extra-cover boundary to complete a running catch, and when Hafeez and Younis Khan were dismissed soon after, Pakistan looked poised for a trademark capitulation.

But it was the choke, not the collapse, that did for Pakistan as New Zealand applied the squeeze through McCullum and Woodcock. Umar Akmal's slog over midwicket in the 13th over, an oddity in an otherwise docile period replete with singles and dot-balls as the asking-rate rose steadily. The strangle brought wickets for the hosts, as Asad Shafiq perished attempting to hit out, and the pressure was increased when Abdul Razzaq departed for 14. Umar Gul attempted to launch his first delivery off McCullum over the longest boundary of the ground, but was caught on the line. Akmal was left to perform a miracle with the tail, the required run-rate already tipping 20 and three wickets remaining.

Tim Southee almost had two hat-tricks in two games as Akmal and Riaz were dismissed off consecutive deliveries in the final over, but the game was long over by that stage.

New Zealand's strong total was set up by Guptill, who had lost none of his form and panache from his innings in the first Twenty20. He set about taking apart the Pakistan attack following the early loss of Jesse Ryder. Guptill pulled, glanced, drove and slogged for 44, building a 91-run partnership for the second wicket with James Franklin, who made 39 after being promoted to No. 3. Afridi brought on the spinners to apply the brakes and the move paid dividends momentarily, as wickets fell at regular intervals. His wayward seamers, however, could not stem the flow of runs for extended periods of time. Scott Styris exploited Gul to swipe his way to a 14-ball 34, and Taylor once again provided stability in the middle. But it was Peter McGlashan's dazzling cameo that took New Zealand from a good total to an excellent one as Gul's third over was dispatched for plenty.

Twice McGlashan swept over fine leg, dragging balls from well outside off stump and manipulating the wrists to get the desired elevation and direction, before Afridi was forced to make the field change. Putting a fine leg out meant bringing the third man in, and McGlashan was quick to adapt. A drive past cover brought up the third consecutive four, but the next two deliveries were met by two jaw-dropping reverse pulls, both of which sailed over the ropes to complete a stunning five-ball burst in which 24 runs were plundered. Taylor took control after McGlashan's departure and ensured that New Zealand finished strongly.

Andrew Fernando writes for The Pigeon and blogs here

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