Australia v England, 4th ODI, Perth

Stokes inspires England to much-needed win

The Report by Andrew McGlashan

January 24, 2014

Comments: 193 | Text size: A | A

England 8 for 316 (Buttler 71, Stokes 70, Bell 55, Faulkner 4-67) beat Australia 259 (Finch 108, Stokes 4-38) by 57 runs
Scorecard and ball-by-ball details


Ben Stokes acknowledges reaching his first half-century on ODIs, Australia v England, 4th ODI, Perth, January 24, 2014
Ben Stokes followed up 70 with the bat by taking four wickets in England's first win over Australia on tour © Getty Images
Enlarge

It has happened. It's not an apparition. England have beaten Australia. After 91 days on a gut-wrenching tour that has brought defeat and despair, they can at least remind themselves what winning a cricket match feels like after securing a 57-run victory at the WACA.

Two players with huge roles to play in the future were central to the success. Ben Stokes hit his maiden ODI fifty, a steady 70 in his new role at No. 3, then followed it with four wickets, and Jos Buttler had given England the breathing space they needed with another brilliant late-order display. Buttler hit 71 off 43 balls just when the innings was threatening to lose its way after the top three had laid the best foundation of the series.

Buttler struck four sixes, including one off Mitchell Johnson, whose 10 overs cost 72, as the final six overs of the innings brought 69 runs, with Eoin Morgan playing his part in a stand of 71. Buttler's scoop came out but it was his straight hitting that was most eye-catching and his status continues to rise, day by day. It was Buttler, too, who held the final catch to bring a rare smile to the fact of Alastair Cook and his team.

After the series was decided in Sydney, Cook said he would consider his future as one-day captain when the tour was finished but at the toss today he admitted it had been the emotion speaking and, having reflected on things for a few days in Perth, he was now "desperate" to continue in his current capacity. A win here, albeit against an Australia side without four senior players, will have lifted his spirits further.

Although there was a superbly composed hundred by Aaron Finch, his second of the series, to anchor Australia's chase there were no pyrotechnics from James Faulkner to steal the game away. This time Faulkner fell for 2, getting a thin edge as he tried to cut Stokes, much to the relief of those playing in red. The moment got the better of Stokes, who gave Faulkner a send-off, and the umpires felt they needed to step in.

Smart Stats

  • This was England's first win in ten international matches, since their win against Australia in an ODI at Sophia Gardens, Cardiff last year.
  • Ben Stokes' all-round performance in this match is only the seventh instance of an England player scoring fifty-plus and taking four or more wickets in an ODI. The previous such instance was by Paul Collingwood, against New Zealand in 2008.
  • Jos Buttler's 71 runs and five catches in this match is the eighth instance of a wicketkeeper scoring a fifty and collecting five dismissals in an ODI, and the second such instance by an England wicketkeeper. Geriant Jones hit 71 runs and took five catches in an ODI, also against Australia, at Lord's in 2005.
  • Buttler's 71 was the second highest by an England wicketkeeper in ODIs in Australia after Alec Stewart's 77 against South Africa at the MCG in the 1992 World Cup. Buttler's score was also the highest by an England No. 7 in ODIs in Australia, beating Michael Yardy's unbeaten 60 against the hosts at the WACA in 2011.
  • Aaron Finch's century in this match was the 11th by an Australia batsman at the WACA in ODIs and the seventh by an Australia opener at this venue. Adam Gilchrist was the last Australia opener to hit a century here, against Sri Lanka in 2008.

Stokes also removed George Bailey, Australia's stand-in captain, through smart use of the DRS after he had spotted a thin edge on a leg-side glance, dispatched the power Glenn Maxwell who played a an ugly swipe to leg and bowled Johnson. The over in which he claimed Maxwell, the 40th of the innings, became a maiden and it was a show of his character after being one of Faulkner's victims at the Gabba although his copybook was blotted a little when he shelled Nathan Coulter-Nile for what would have been the winning moment.

Australia had raced out of the blocks in their chase as Chris Jordan struggled with his run up and Stuart Broad continued to search for rhythm. Both bowlers improved during the innings. Tim Bresnan provided the first breakthrough when Shaun Marsh carelessly guided to second slip and England's cause was helped by a stuttering comeback innings from Matthew Wade who never found his timing before finding mid-off.

At the other end, however, Finch was playing an outstanding hand and constantly scored above a run-a-ball. His first boundary was an airy drive over cover, but there was due respect shown to good deliveries then the decisiveness to pick off boundaries when they were needed. He forced Cook to change tack when he deposited James Tredwell for consecutive sixes and also drove Bresnan back over his head.

His hundred came from 97 balls but the game started to edge England's way when he guided Bresnan to third man where Broad held a good running catch.

The way England's batting order is constructed provokes much debate; this was almost the ideal formula for how they see it working. The opening stand of 87 in 12 overs was more than has been delivered of late; in the early stages, Australia's quick bowlers varied between too full and too short, which is often a failure of visiting attacks.

Stokes' innings, his maiden ODI fifty was an excellent response after he'd struggled in his first innings at No. 3 in Sydney. This time he was quickly into double figures and the brisk start he arrived on the back of allowed him time to settle. He had some tricky moments against Johnson, and on 29 edged a very tough chance to Marsh at slip, but also unfurled some eye-catching drives which were a feature of his Test century on this ground last month before top-edging a sweep off Faulkner.

Cook and Ian Bell, with 47-ball fifty, had led the positive start, hitting 12 boundaries in the first 10 overs, and Australia were as ragged as at any time in the season. Bell was given lives on 48 and 52 although neither miss was costly, as Bell flicked a poor delivery from Daniel Christian straight to short fine-leg.

There had more than a hint of anger and frustration in the England captain's batting, especially when he plundered three consecutive boundaries in Coulter-Nile's first over, but for the third time in a row he fell to Maxwell. He left with an angry swish of the bat but, by the end of the day, being England cricket captain will have felt just a little bit better.

Andrew McGlashan is an assistant editor at ESPNcricinfo

RSS Feeds: Andrew McGlashan

© ESPN Sports Media Ltd.

Posted by ScottStevo on (January 26, 2014, 17:54 GMT)

@Harmony11, well, as usual, you're looking rather foolish after we just defended 217! How did India go again? Good luck trying to impress us that you're anything other than home town heroes, sport. 0-10 away for India - so you're beating us there too, bud. Seriously, you have no meaningful contribution here other than running arguments off on bizarre tangents that are completely irrelevant, and yet still make India look worse than Aus. You discuss Aus posters commenting on Ind threads, yet, here you are? Great point! Funny there are so many posts when you lose, hey? Ever think and wonder why? You then discuss physical injuries and compare them to mental illness. Seriously?! No, I don't agree that - we;ve clearly rested the four players I mentioned who are first choice players? So, we rested our captain for this match, so you agree that he's missing from our team? What a thoughtless argument you make. Wade may have been selected, but it's rather clear he's not good enough and shouldn't

Posted by Shaggy076 on (January 26, 2014, 12:14 GMT)

Harmony111. Aussie wickets bounce and are good for batting. They are only good for paceman against rubbish batsman that can't play a ball that gets above knee height. One-day wickets are particularly flat with rubbish white balls that you can't shine. Australia just had 3 months of bad cricket and haven't been rubbish for a long time but even during that period we won one-day international's. Why are you so aggressivr to anyone that questions your completely non factual 100.% biased posts?

Posted by Harmony111 on (January 26, 2014, 7:37 GMT)

@Ragavendran Vijayshankar:

Is that so? Do you know how many comments the 2nd Ind-NZ ODI article got? 1000+ and still counting. 3rd match had 400+ comments in less than 10 hours. In comparison, this article is about a match that was played 3 days back back and it doesn't even have 200 comments.

So you tell me, who goes where to comment? Check any article related to India and keep an eye on Pak, SL, SA, Eng, Aus fans who routinely comment there. If you had any idea about the reality you won't have said what you have said.

Posted by JG2704 on (January 25, 2014, 19:59 GMT)

@CodandChips - Re Buttler , When he played for Somerset we had plenty of power at the top of the order (Tres/Kies/Trego) and then we'd have guys like Hildreth or Compton and then Buttler would come in at 6 (never any lower than 6). But the difference is that he would often come in at 4 or 5 for Somerset if they were only 2 or 3 daown with 20-25 overs to go. I just think the way the game is set up the team is over reliant on Jos to produce heroics every time. The good thing is that he's learning to pace his inns better than he did when he 1st came into the side (even when he doesn't have that long at the crease) but when it doesn't come off we get a way below par total - like in the 3rd ODI

Posted by JG2704 on (January 25, 2014, 19:59 GMT)

@Marcio on (January 25, 2014, 2:00 GMT) So when Australia win it's because they're dominant but when they lose it's because they're not taking the game seriously? Both teams have rested players in this series and I'm pretty sure Australia would wanted to have won the ODI series by whitewash too and had confidence that they still had the quality to win.Look at your bowling stats and it wasn't the fringe players who went for big runs but Mitch and Faulkner

@ScottStevo - Ok you didn't say it was an A team or B team or whatever but you responded in animated fashion to a guy who basically was just saying why can't fans just give credit , lambast their own side , both or just not bother? You also go on to say Wade isn't even a D team player. Sorry but isn't it who the selectors rate that counts on this one? And the selectors rate Wade as better than E team material.

Posted by JG2704 on (January 25, 2014, 19:49 GMT)

@Marcio on (January 25, 2014, 2:00 GMT) So when Australia win it's because they're dominant but when they lose it's because they're not taking the game seriously? Both teams have rested players in this series and I'm pretty sure Australia would wanted to have won the ODI series by whitewash too and had confidence that they still had the quality to win.Look at your bowling stats and it wasn't the fringe players who went for big runs but Mitch and Faulkner

@ScottStevo - Ok you didn't say it was an A team or B team or whatever but you responded in animated fashion to a guy who basically was just saying why can't fans just give credit , lambast their own side , both or just not bother? You also go on to say Wade isn't even a D team player. Sorry but isn't it who the selectors rate that counts on this one? And the selectors rate Wade as better than E team material.

Posted by CodandChips on (January 25, 2014, 15:08 GMT)

@JG2704 I also agree that the middle order has been a bit of a problem. Personally I'd like James Taylor to get a go. List A and First Class averages of around 50. Can dominate (eg that hundred vs Hampshire the day KP retired from international circket).

Posted by CodandChips on (January 25, 2014, 15:06 GMT)

@JG2704 agree that Ballance has been too cautious. Perhaps he should get a go lower down just to relieve any pressure? I reckon he could do a job at 5 next series in West Indies because he can be destructive. Where does he bat in all forms for Yorkshire- has he batted 5, or does he always bat 3?

Also perhaps Buttler should go 5 or 6. I reckon he would do better if given a bit of time to play himself in, but at the same time he'd need to be careful. He is easily the best finisher in the country (list A average 50 at strike rate of nearly 130 I think). Are there any other decent finishers in county cricket? Are they all Kolpaks/overseas, such as Crook, Hussey?

Posted by souwesterly on (January 25, 2014, 14:58 GMT)

Despite all the talk of this being a win against an Australian 2nd XI the most pleasing thing, in my opinion was that it came about without England's so-called 'best batsmen and best bowlers' - Trott, Pietersen, Prior, Anderson and Swann. I do accept that a few of the winning team didn't come up to scratch, so there are still a few places for more new blood - but I'd only want to see those 'stars' I've mentioned come back into the team on their merit - not on their history.

Posted by Harmony111 on (January 25, 2014, 13:13 GMT)

@ModernUmpiresPlz:

Why are you being so touchy? When did I say Harris was a softie? Saying someone is OOA after a series isn't the same as saying he is a softie.

I have seen that often ppl here begin to deliberate twisting of what I say cos they are incapable of arguing with me otherwise. You too have tried the same.

Later on you admit that your bowlers are useless if they do not get help from the wicket. This means they too are Green Top Bullies else they can't do much. Isn't cricket about being able to play on diff wickets? Any wicket should be fins as long as it is not dangerous but still you are complaining about Indian wickets.

Aren't Aussie wickets helpful for fast bowling? Then pls explain the two 300+ conceded by Aus fast bowlers this time. Or do you now mean that the Aus fast bowlers needs absolutely fav conditions with tonnes of grass, dark clouds all day and plenty of bounce to do well? How many times will you jump here & there?

Comments have now been closed for this article

TopTop
Email Feedback Print
Share
E-mail
Feedback
Print
Andrew McGlashanClose
Andrew McGlashan Assistant Editor Andrew arrived at ESPNcricinfo via Manchester and Cape Town, after finding the assistant editor at a weak moment as he watched England's batting collapse in the Newlands Test. Andrew began his cricket writing as a freelance covering Lancashire during 2004 when they were relegated in the County Championship. In fact, they were top of the table when he began reporting on them but things went dramatically downhill. He likes to let people know that he is a supporter of county cricket, a fact his colleagues will testify to and bemoan in equal quantities.
Tour Results
Australia v England at Sydney - Feb 2, 2014
Australia won by 84 runs
Australia v England at Melbourne - Jan 31, 2014
Australia won by 8 wickets (with 31 balls remaining)
Australia v England at Hobart - Jan 29, 2014
Australia won by 13 runs
Australia v England at Adelaide - Jan 26, 2014
Australia won by 5 runs
Australia v England at Perth - Jan 24, 2014
England won by 57 runs
More results »
News | Features Last 3 days
News | Features Last 3 days
Sponsored Links

Why not you? Read and learn how!