England news September 22, 2011

Edgbaston misses out on 2013 Ashes

ESPNcricinfo staff
31

Trent Bridge was the most successful English ground, securing two Ashes Tests, while Lancashire's investments to revamp their facilities at Old Trafford have paid off after their venues were allocated an Australia Test in 2013, as the ECB announced the lucrative allocation of international fixtures for 2012-2016 on Wednesday. Somewhat surprisingly, Cardiff beat the Rose Bowl to secure an Ashes Test in 2015, while Edgbaston has missed out on a slot for the marquee series in 2013 .

Glamorgan, who will also host the New Zealand Test in 2013, will be considered lucky to have made the grade. Cardiff suffered due to the poor crowds and weather during the visit of Sri Lanka - just 922 were present to witness England's dramatic final-day victory - and Glamorgan have already had to hand back their Test against West Indies next season which has been allocated to Lord's.

The county are still paying the ECB for the Sri Lanka Test but Lord Morris of Handsworth, who chaired the major match group, defended the decision to had Cardiff another Ashes match. "The submission they put forward met the broad and basic criteria and on the overall assessment they merited the award of the 2015 Test," he said.

"We are very keen to see England cricket at Test level - or major match level - in all regions. Cricket is not a London-centric or Midlands-centric sport. That's why we were very supportive to develop cricket in Wales, Durham and elsewhere."

There was never any doubt about Trent Bridge's suitability for international cricket but the ground's standing has been emphasised by the allocations. "To secure Ashes Tests matches in both the 2013 and 2015 series is a tremendous endorsement of our track record of delivery and the pledges that we made in our bid," Derek Brewer, the Nottinghamshire chief executive, said. "International cricket has always been extremely well supported in the East Midlands and I am delighted that our members and supporters will be able to attend such high-profile matches at Trent Bridge.

"This package of matches will enable us to continue to invest in our venue, our professional team and our community projects and there is a lot of work to be done to harness all of the opportunities that Ashes Tests provide," added Brewer. "I am really grateful to all those who have played their part in this process and pleased that they have been rewarded with cricket matches that can do so much for our venue, our community and the regional economy. It has been a real team effort."

Lancashire will also be very relieved to have secured the Ashes Test, as well as Tests against India and Pakistan in 2014 and 2016, and a number of limited-overs matches. "This has been our goal since 2006," said Lancashire chief executive Jim Cumbes. "Naturally we are delighted to see the Ashes return to Old Trafford in advance of the 2013 match.

"It has certainly been a fantastic couple of weeks for the club: winning the County Championship after such a long wait and getting the final seal of approval to proceed with our redevelopment. This is just the icing on the cake. We now look forward to transforming Old Trafford into a world class venue fit to host international cricket."

There is a feel-good factor around Old Trafford after Lancashire ended their 77-year wait for the County Championship last week, but despite the £550,000 prize for first place (most of which goes to the players) the club needed to gain an Ashes Test to help pay for the extensive redevelopment of the ground.

Time had almost run out for them as the long-running legal battles over the ground's plans dragged well into this season. They were eventually won but the latest phase of building work only began in the last month. Lancashire are confident they remain on course to complete the work by 2013 - and the new player and media facilities may be open by next August - and the ECB have allocated matches on the promise of a final product.

Warwickshire, however, already have a finished product and it had been thought that Edgbaston's infrastructure, particularly the imposing new stand which made an impressive debut during the Test against India, would count in its favour, while the ground also hosted Twenty20 finals day this year. But they will miss out on Australia's visit in 2013 although will host finals day in four consecutive summers plus a semi-final in the World Test Championship.

Rod Bransgrove, the Hampshire chairman, was also left to ponder what the future holds for Hampshire after the Rose Bowl was left with one Test in five years after staging its first with the visit of Sri Lanka this season.

The system for allocating the fixtures altered from the closed bidding process that attracted controversy for forcing counties to spend more money than they could really afford in order to host England games. This time counties had aimed for fixed-price groups of matches and were been judged on factors such as infrastructure, operations, legacy and community commitment.

Gloucestershire will host just three ODIs between 2012-2016 after missing out on any further matches to raise doubts about Bristol's viability as an international venue.

"We recognise Bristol has some challenging circumstances, the location of the ground for example," Lord Morris said. "Our chairman has indicated his willingness to sit down with them and examine the overall position of the club to see what, if anything, the ECB can do to assist."

2013 Ashes venues: Lord's, Trent Bridge, Old Trafford, Durham, The Oval.

2015 Ashes venues: Lord's, Trent Bridge, Cardiff, Edgbaston, The Oval.

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • A_Yorkshire_Lad on September 24, 2011, 8:50 GMT

    @randyoz - Hey , that was actually quite funny - well done ! Just goes to show , doesn't it , that even a stopped clock is right twice a day. Keep up that standard , Lad , and soon we'll all be laughing with you and not at you

  • Ghal on September 23, 2011, 7:13 GMT

    Edgbaston should talk to India & Pakistan about hosting a test match or a series of ODI's/T20's between them. It would be good for cricket to have that rivalry re-established and having it at a neutral venue would avoid the politics. Ofcourse BCCI, PCB & Edgbaston will make a healthy profit since the match(es) will be a sell-out and SKY will pay for the broadcast rights. And there'll be a bunch of very happy fans in the Midlands. Win, win, win?

  • Nutcutlet on September 23, 2011, 7:12 GMT

    @ Mitchell Pagett. Good research. I suppose we can agree that it depends where lines are drawn. Census figures for 2001 (the latest that are available) has an interesting comparison in terms of region (which, I admit, was not what I said). West Midlands: 5,267,308; North West England: 6,729,764. Then there are my other points: sporting tradition and facilities. Manchester was awarded the Commonwealth Games ahead of Birmingham. Then there's the tedious football comparison which hardly interests me at all. I'm not sure how you'd go about comparing facilites and I am sure that the two cities and their regions have much to offer. What I will concede - and pointedly failed to mention - Birmingham is much drier (or less wet) than Manchester! All the same, good to see Old Trafford has got its test in 2013. Lancs CCC (I support Surrey, btw!) deserves it after their legal traumas this year. Best wishes.

  • 200ondebut on September 23, 2011, 6:15 GMT

    What is not mentioned in this article is the process - it is an auction. As such most things other than money are discounted. The ground that bid the most get the games.

  • Jonathan_E on September 23, 2011, 0:16 GMT

    More to the point why are we hosting Australia in 2015? That's the year we should be VISITING them. Home ashes series should be every 4 years, not every 2. Is there nobody else who was willing to come and visit us that summer?

  • Patchmaster on September 22, 2011, 23:50 GMT

    It seems so wrong not to see a Headingly test in there - so many wonderful RESULT matches have been played their, possibly one of the most famous Ashes victories of all time. Plus the Yorkshire atmosphere is incredible (and I'm from lancs !) Great shame for the game.

  • on September 22, 2011, 23:02 GMT

    its a disgrace to give 2 ashes tests to cardiff and yet completely overlook the rosebowl, they produced a good wicket for the sri lanka test and scores have been just right all season, lots of results have happened, cardiff may have a nice setting but the weather is rarely any good and i dont get why they need 2 matches

  • Trickstar on September 22, 2011, 20:31 GMT

    @Angela Briggs We've got back to back Ashes in 2013 then go to Oz in Nov to Jan 2013/14, literally 4 months later, to play again, this has been done so England won't have to go to a World Cup straight after a away Ashes series. I personally think they would have been better missing a year instead of having 2 series separated by only a few months, it's not really ideal if you win the Ashes then lose it 5 months later, where's the bragging rights in that. Here's the article:http://www.espncricinfo.com/the-ashes-2010-11/content/story/498610.html

  • on September 22, 2011, 18:36 GMT

    Headingley isn't mentioned because Yorkshire didn't bid for Ashes Tests, due to their financial problems caused by them hosting the Oz-Pakistan Test last year.

  • on September 22, 2011, 16:25 GMT

    Tom_Bowler - you couldn't have been at Cardiff for the last day of the first Ashes Test in 2009 - the atmosphere was amazing, crowd fantastic and anything but dead; I have been to tests in Port Of Spain and Cape Town and this was easily the equal of those. Also Cardiff has a beautiful setting with loads of facilities on the doorstep; and the 'meet and greet' was as good as you'd get anywhere.

    But - can anyone tell me why we have Ashes series in 13 and 15? Isn't this overkill?

  • A_Yorkshire_Lad on September 24, 2011, 8:50 GMT

    @randyoz - Hey , that was actually quite funny - well done ! Just goes to show , doesn't it , that even a stopped clock is right twice a day. Keep up that standard , Lad , and soon we'll all be laughing with you and not at you

  • Ghal on September 23, 2011, 7:13 GMT

    Edgbaston should talk to India & Pakistan about hosting a test match or a series of ODI's/T20's between them. It would be good for cricket to have that rivalry re-established and having it at a neutral venue would avoid the politics. Ofcourse BCCI, PCB & Edgbaston will make a healthy profit since the match(es) will be a sell-out and SKY will pay for the broadcast rights. And there'll be a bunch of very happy fans in the Midlands. Win, win, win?

  • Nutcutlet on September 23, 2011, 7:12 GMT

    @ Mitchell Pagett. Good research. I suppose we can agree that it depends where lines are drawn. Census figures for 2001 (the latest that are available) has an interesting comparison in terms of region (which, I admit, was not what I said). West Midlands: 5,267,308; North West England: 6,729,764. Then there are my other points: sporting tradition and facilities. Manchester was awarded the Commonwealth Games ahead of Birmingham. Then there's the tedious football comparison which hardly interests me at all. I'm not sure how you'd go about comparing facilites and I am sure that the two cities and their regions have much to offer. What I will concede - and pointedly failed to mention - Birmingham is much drier (or less wet) than Manchester! All the same, good to see Old Trafford has got its test in 2013. Lancs CCC (I support Surrey, btw!) deserves it after their legal traumas this year. Best wishes.

  • 200ondebut on September 23, 2011, 6:15 GMT

    What is not mentioned in this article is the process - it is an auction. As such most things other than money are discounted. The ground that bid the most get the games.

  • Jonathan_E on September 23, 2011, 0:16 GMT

    More to the point why are we hosting Australia in 2015? That's the year we should be VISITING them. Home ashes series should be every 4 years, not every 2. Is there nobody else who was willing to come and visit us that summer?

  • Patchmaster on September 22, 2011, 23:50 GMT

    It seems so wrong not to see a Headingly test in there - so many wonderful RESULT matches have been played their, possibly one of the most famous Ashes victories of all time. Plus the Yorkshire atmosphere is incredible (and I'm from lancs !) Great shame for the game.

  • on September 22, 2011, 23:02 GMT

    its a disgrace to give 2 ashes tests to cardiff and yet completely overlook the rosebowl, they produced a good wicket for the sri lanka test and scores have been just right all season, lots of results have happened, cardiff may have a nice setting but the weather is rarely any good and i dont get why they need 2 matches

  • Trickstar on September 22, 2011, 20:31 GMT

    @Angela Briggs We've got back to back Ashes in 2013 then go to Oz in Nov to Jan 2013/14, literally 4 months later, to play again, this has been done so England won't have to go to a World Cup straight after a away Ashes series. I personally think they would have been better missing a year instead of having 2 series separated by only a few months, it's not really ideal if you win the Ashes then lose it 5 months later, where's the bragging rights in that. Here's the article:http://www.espncricinfo.com/the-ashes-2010-11/content/story/498610.html

  • on September 22, 2011, 18:36 GMT

    Headingley isn't mentioned because Yorkshire didn't bid for Ashes Tests, due to their financial problems caused by them hosting the Oz-Pakistan Test last year.

  • on September 22, 2011, 16:25 GMT

    Tom_Bowler - you couldn't have been at Cardiff for the last day of the first Ashes Test in 2009 - the atmosphere was amazing, crowd fantastic and anything but dead; I have been to tests in Port Of Spain and Cape Town and this was easily the equal of those. Also Cardiff has a beautiful setting with loads of facilities on the doorstep; and the 'meet and greet' was as good as you'd get anywhere.

    But - can anyone tell me why we have Ashes series in 13 and 15? Isn't this overkill?

  • bumsonseats on September 22, 2011, 15:06 GMT

    as i go to both Durham and Lancashire. but feel Durham is a poor test ground and should not be given as a right to hold test matches. i know they have a good team and the public are very loyal, but does not have the feel of a test ground. dpk

  • correctcall on September 22, 2011, 14:59 GMT

    Irrespective of which grounds are chosen the ECB needs to sort out the lack of replay for EACH and EVERY ball shown on the in-ground big screen. People wish to see what happens in detail - otherwise they stay at home and watch on TV. Not much to ask for the entry prices charged. Appreciate the big screens must generate advertising revenue but that need not compromise ball by ball replays. If the Aussie grounds can cater properly to cricket fans with full replays why can't the ECB?

  • paulmj19 on September 22, 2011, 14:57 GMT

    The weather is usually drier in Co. Durham than it is in Birmingham, Manchester or Cardiff. Trouble is the ECB keep allocating international matches to Chester Le Street in early May or September when the weather is usually not so goog across the whole of Britain!!

  • bumsonseats on September 22, 2011, 14:53 GMT

    nice to see lanky back on the test agenda. my hope is that the pitches look and play better than the limited number of games played on it this season did. i was disappointed that the lancs - hants match was switched as i had reserved my 3 nights in the lodge. will the pitches play like they did making it the best pitch in the uk for batters and bowlers of quality, i hope so. lets get those £s rolling into OT coffers. dpk

  • AndyWilts on September 22, 2011, 14:49 GMT

    I have not read anywhere why England have home Ashes series in 2013 and 2015?

    2013 is expected because Ashes series happen in England every 4 years, but surely the next series in England after that shouldn't be until 2017?

  • AJ_Tiger86 on September 22, 2011, 14:39 GMT

    ECB's obsession with Cardiff is really suspicious. What makes Cardiff a good place to play test cricket? It has a capacity of ONLY 15000, compared to Edgbaston's 25000. And NOBODY likes cricket in Wales. Only 922 people turned up to watch one of the most exciting victories by England earlier this year. The stands were EMPTY on Day 1, Day 2, Day 3, Day 4 and Day 5. No excuses -- people in Cardiff just couldn't care less about cricket. So, why not give the wonderful cricket fans at Birmingham the chance to watch Ashes cricket?

  • JosRoberts on September 22, 2011, 13:48 GMT

    Be honest, the Ashes tests should go to the counties who didn't have one last time round - i.e. Trent Bridge and Old Trafford. Stuff the Rose Bowl - if there are already 2 test in London then they don't need another one in Southampton.

  • on September 22, 2011, 12:56 GMT

    Durham is a good track providing they get all 5 days of summer in a row and that coincides with the test dates (about 14,129:1 odds)

    Old Trafford is probably the best pitch in the country once it returns to it's pacey, bouncey self

    Edgbaston: it turns sometimes...

    Headingley has been a terrible pitch for 2 years (I'm assuming they don't want the wicket that produced the 4 day innings win that we saw in the Ashes 2 years ago and have ended up with the other extreme)

    Lords is looking as flat as ever the past 4-5 years

    The Oval? 'Nuff said

    Cardiff... "Found another flat pitch, sah!", "good, we could do with some more of those"

    Trent Bridge... so long as it's green and the sun doesn't come out.

    Rose Bowl... Only seen 1 bowling attack in test matches, let NZ play on it or anyone else that isn't going to win an hour let alone a series

  • on September 22, 2011, 12:48 GMT

    Yorkshire Pudding - completely agree with your views about Lords, ghastly place has no atmosphere. Nothing annoys me more than seeing people wearing ties at a sporting event. Called me old fashioned but I regard a day at the cricket as a day out a chance to chill, relax & have a good time...& definately no Ties! Edgbaston has to be a shoe in - superb new stand, largest capacity in England, brilliant atmosphere & a wicket that rewards good batting & good bowling

  • on September 22, 2011, 12:45 GMT

    @Nutcutlet City of Manchester Population 498,800 - City of Birmingham Population 1,036,900. Or if you like Manchester Metropolitan Area 2,556,000 - Birmingham Metropolitan Area 3,683,000. so how exactly is manchester the second city in population??? A renovated Edgbaston has proven it can handle a top qualtiy Test Match with this summer's game against India a great success. England have a history of winning at Edgbaston and Edgbaston statistically is the ground least disrupted by rain. Birmingham is also the most accesible place for fans nationwide being bang in the centre of the country. There's still question marks over Old Trafford's pitch. Should be ready by 2013?? is that good enough to get an Ashes Test. Better to wait until 2015 to be sure and so the Gold Package should go to Edgbaston - Frankly, overwhelming

  • YorkshirePudding on September 22, 2011, 11:53 GMT

    @Tom_Bowler, sounds like you have something against the north of england. I could point out that the Oval is occupied by city-boys who have no idea about cricket and are just there to say they were there, lords is full of snooty toff's who think they are the only ones deserving to watch cricket.

  • Tom_Bowler on September 22, 2011, 8:12 GMT

    Cardiff never; dead wicket, uninterested public and a nightmare to travel to from the cricketing heartlands in the South and North of England. That aside I don't care too much. Old Trafford is haunted by ludicrously parochial Mancs and was the worst Test ground I've ever been to but presumably the latter at least has been sorted and if the wicket regains its old pace and carry great. The Rosebowl produced a fine Test match strip earlier this year. Trent Bridge is a lovely ground and always produces good cricket. Edgbaston's got a great atmosphere and England have a fine record there. I'm mildly prejudiced against Durham as the weather is so often awful and Headingley just because it's in Yorkshire but in general anywhere but Cardiff suits me.

  • Geeva on September 22, 2011, 5:48 GMT

    The ECB should have stuck with the 6 orignal test playing grounds(Lord's, Headingly, Edgbaston, Old Trafford, Trent Bridge and the Oval)!!If they wanted the grounds to be state of the art they should have provided funding!!Now old trafford leeds notts and birmingham are going to be under financial trouble if they dont get matches!The 6 grounds are icons in the game!!I guess the ECB was more interested in revenue that heritage and history!!as a cricket fan from SA have to english grounds are heritage sites :)

  • YorkshirePudding on September 22, 2011, 4:15 GMT

    Yes, edgbaston as a great new stand but it still needs to update the facilites for the general public, the Res Wyatt stand, and round to the Erric hollis especially need to be upgraded, if only to provide cover for the public when it rains and updated corporate boxes. Hopefully we will see at least 1 test per year north of the Midlands as well

  • RandyOZ on September 22, 2011, 2:44 GMT

    Surely to keep all their players happy they will have to announce Jo'burg as a venue?

  • 2.14istherunrate on September 21, 2011, 22:57 GMT

    Given Edgbaston's notable record as a venue in ashes matches equalled only by the Oval I feel that not to give there the nod would be insane. Like most English I like to see England win. Edgbaston is the most likely ground to provide such a result. Certainly Headingley after 2009 and other times should pay the price and the match be allocated to the ground with the fastest wicket. Low expectation of rainfall should be another consideration. Probably that points to the Rosebowl at present.

  • Evilpengwinz on September 21, 2011, 20:15 GMT

    Why isn't Headingley mentioned in this article once? It's wrong for Headingley not to have an Ashes test!

  • Nutcutlet on September 21, 2011, 19:55 GMT

    If thre's any justice in this world, then Old Trafford should get an Ashes Test. There are many valid reasons. (1) Manchester is England's second city by population, facilities and sporting tradition; (2) Lancashire CCC has worked its socks off to get the ground up to standard, despite having to contend with monumental legal battles; (3) Old Trafford has got its wickets correctly positioned in a north-south direction at last (and they should have settled by 2013!) (4) Lancashire are the county champions of 2011 and this needs to be handsomely acknowledged with a marquee match (5) Old Trafford has been sidelined for too long. For a ground with its history it's vital that the dust is blown off the venue that has seen some of the greatest test matches ever! Let's hope that wise counsel prevails with the ECB, because these arguments are, frankly, overwhelming.

  • allblue on September 21, 2011, 18:59 GMT

    The oft-repeated 922 figure for Cardiff really should only be mentioned in context, otherwise it's shabby journalism. It was a fifth day so there were no pre-sales. It was a Monday and the weather forecast was dire. With due respect, it was not the most glamorous opposition and the game seemed destined to drift to a dull drawn end, assuming any play at all was possible. Under those circumstances, 922 was as many as anyone could have hoped for, and to imply a wider significance about Cardiff as a Test venue is disingenuous at best. Personally I'm not convinced about its Test match status, and playing the first Ashes Test there in 2009 was a grave error, but it does not deserve to be traduced unfairly. Regarding future allocation: one factor should be paramount. The sell-out games (Australia, India) should be held at the biggest venues, that way more people can get to see them. I know TV money rules the roost these days, but the paying punters deserve some consideration too.

  • CricketPissek on September 21, 2011, 18:48 GMT

    @Sir_Freddie_Flintoff - it's the England and WALES cricket board, so your exclusion of Cardiff, albeit unsurprising, isn't fair. I think most of these counties would argue it being unfair that London gets two test matches.

  • AJ_Tiger86 on September 21, 2011, 16:10 GMT

    Why would they play an Ashes test at Riverside? There should be 6 Ashes tests, and they should be played in the following order: Lord's, Headingly, Edgbaston, Old Trafford, Trent Bridge and the Oval.

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  • AJ_Tiger86 on September 21, 2011, 16:10 GMT

    Why would they play an Ashes test at Riverside? There should be 6 Ashes tests, and they should be played in the following order: Lord's, Headingly, Edgbaston, Old Trafford, Trent Bridge and the Oval.

  • CricketPissek on September 21, 2011, 18:48 GMT

    @Sir_Freddie_Flintoff - it's the England and WALES cricket board, so your exclusion of Cardiff, albeit unsurprising, isn't fair. I think most of these counties would argue it being unfair that London gets two test matches.

  • allblue on September 21, 2011, 18:59 GMT

    The oft-repeated 922 figure for Cardiff really should only be mentioned in context, otherwise it's shabby journalism. It was a fifth day so there were no pre-sales. It was a Monday and the weather forecast was dire. With due respect, it was not the most glamorous opposition and the game seemed destined to drift to a dull drawn end, assuming any play at all was possible. Under those circumstances, 922 was as many as anyone could have hoped for, and to imply a wider significance about Cardiff as a Test venue is disingenuous at best. Personally I'm not convinced about its Test match status, and playing the first Ashes Test there in 2009 was a grave error, but it does not deserve to be traduced unfairly. Regarding future allocation: one factor should be paramount. The sell-out games (Australia, India) should be held at the biggest venues, that way more people can get to see them. I know TV money rules the roost these days, but the paying punters deserve some consideration too.

  • Nutcutlet on September 21, 2011, 19:55 GMT

    If thre's any justice in this world, then Old Trafford should get an Ashes Test. There are many valid reasons. (1) Manchester is England's second city by population, facilities and sporting tradition; (2) Lancashire CCC has worked its socks off to get the ground up to standard, despite having to contend with monumental legal battles; (3) Old Trafford has got its wickets correctly positioned in a north-south direction at last (and they should have settled by 2013!) (4) Lancashire are the county champions of 2011 and this needs to be handsomely acknowledged with a marquee match (5) Old Trafford has been sidelined for too long. For a ground with its history it's vital that the dust is blown off the venue that has seen some of the greatest test matches ever! Let's hope that wise counsel prevails with the ECB, because these arguments are, frankly, overwhelming.

  • Evilpengwinz on September 21, 2011, 20:15 GMT

    Why isn't Headingley mentioned in this article once? It's wrong for Headingley not to have an Ashes test!

  • 2.14istherunrate on September 21, 2011, 22:57 GMT

    Given Edgbaston's notable record as a venue in ashes matches equalled only by the Oval I feel that not to give there the nod would be insane. Like most English I like to see England win. Edgbaston is the most likely ground to provide such a result. Certainly Headingley after 2009 and other times should pay the price and the match be allocated to the ground with the fastest wicket. Low expectation of rainfall should be another consideration. Probably that points to the Rosebowl at present.

  • RandyOZ on September 22, 2011, 2:44 GMT

    Surely to keep all their players happy they will have to announce Jo'burg as a venue?

  • YorkshirePudding on September 22, 2011, 4:15 GMT

    Yes, edgbaston as a great new stand but it still needs to update the facilites for the general public, the Res Wyatt stand, and round to the Erric hollis especially need to be upgraded, if only to provide cover for the public when it rains and updated corporate boxes. Hopefully we will see at least 1 test per year north of the Midlands as well

  • Geeva on September 22, 2011, 5:48 GMT

    The ECB should have stuck with the 6 orignal test playing grounds(Lord's, Headingly, Edgbaston, Old Trafford, Trent Bridge and the Oval)!!If they wanted the grounds to be state of the art they should have provided funding!!Now old trafford leeds notts and birmingham are going to be under financial trouble if they dont get matches!The 6 grounds are icons in the game!!I guess the ECB was more interested in revenue that heritage and history!!as a cricket fan from SA have to english grounds are heritage sites :)

  • Tom_Bowler on September 22, 2011, 8:12 GMT

    Cardiff never; dead wicket, uninterested public and a nightmare to travel to from the cricketing heartlands in the South and North of England. That aside I don't care too much. Old Trafford is haunted by ludicrously parochial Mancs and was the worst Test ground I've ever been to but presumably the latter at least has been sorted and if the wicket regains its old pace and carry great. The Rosebowl produced a fine Test match strip earlier this year. Trent Bridge is a lovely ground and always produces good cricket. Edgbaston's got a great atmosphere and England have a fine record there. I'm mildly prejudiced against Durham as the weather is so often awful and Headingley just because it's in Yorkshire but in general anywhere but Cardiff suits me.