May 31, 2008

Bermuda

Perfect practice makes perfect

Will Luke

Michael Young, Australia's fielding coach, is spending time with Bermuda and Canada to lend his extensive experience to the two Associate countries. But, in an in-depth interview for The Royal Gazette, he reveals how he doesn't think he could work with amateurs on a full-time basis.

"Justin Langer was not the most talented player, but he was committed to perfect practice, and that's one of the things I have talked to these guys about.

"Practice doesn't make perfect, but perfect practice makes perfect. And those are the things that they need to understand. There needs to be an accountability, every job is the same. You can do it half-arsed, and you're going to get half-arsed results. Or you can do the extra and try to get more, that's how you get to the other levels."

Getting the extra has been problematic in recent weeks, and while Young is happy to contribute some of his time, he doubts he could do it on a regualr basis.

"These guys all have jobs, so the mentality is different, there is a different approach," he said. "I don't know how long I could do this (working with teams such as Bermuda). I'll be honest, I don't know how long I could do it because I believe in commitment and it would be hard for me to work with amateur players."

Read the full story at the Royal Gazette.

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Posted by Simon Butler on (June 9, 2008, 4:03 GMT)

I disagree with you, i think every team needs a fielding coach. because yes it is easy to say what you have to do to be a good fielding side, its another to do it. The main reason Australia is the best team in the world is because of there fielding. Yes they have Symonds, Ponting and Clarke, and yes they were good fielders when they started, like many players of yesteryear, but because of the commitment and because of the quality coach these guys received over the years, they have become extraordinary. If sides like Canada and Bermuda are to succeed at international level they must all be good fields, not just the symond's, ponting's and Clarke's of the world. That is why Zimbabwe was so successful in the late 90s, they didn't have the best players in the world. But they rivaled South Africa and Australia in the field hence why they were always competitive. Fielding is the most important part of the game.

Posted by poor old bowler on (June 2, 2008, 8:59 GMT)

its a waste of time hiring a fielding coach.especially one who thinks it will be hard to work with amateur players.

when catching keep your eye on the ball and catch with soft hands,chase hard after every ball turning twos into ones.and aim at the stumps when throwing or just above the bails into the keepers gloves.

i don't like fielding coaches who try and reteach players basics like throwing.just pick the ball up and throw it at the stumps.

i think a monkey could be the Australian fielding coach with players like symonds,pointing and clarke.

fielding is often neglected at cricket training,i believe for a club side cricket training should be 3 nights a week.2 nights for batting and bowling 1 night for fielding.

we will see with Bermuda or Canada whether its the coach or the players involved that determine a teams fielding abilities.i believe its the players.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Will Luke
Assistant editor Will opted against a lifetime of head-bangingly dull administration in the NHS, where he had served for two years. In 2005 came a break at Cricinfo where he slotted right in as a ferociously enthusiastic tea drinker and maker, with a penchant for using "frankly" and "marvellous". He also runs The Corridor, a cricket blog where he can be found ranting and raving about all things - some even involving the sport. He is a great-great nephew of Sir Jack Newman, the former Wellingtonian bowler who took two wickets at 127 apiece for New Zealand.

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