July 23, 2010

Sidharth Monga on India in Sri Lanka 2010

'It was like Michael Jackson coming'

Sidharth Monga
Don Bradman at the P Sara Oval, March 31, 2948
Sir Donald Bradman at the P Sara Oval in 1948  © ESPNcricinfo Ltd
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P Sara Oval, the venue for the third Test of this series, is the only ground in Asia where Don Bradman played. He did so on a 20-yard pitch. In Brightly Fades the Don, Jack Fingleton writes: “It is possible one of her male assistants (the round had a lady curator) measured the pitch and not she. The Australian batsmen found the going rather tough in the morning. It was hard to get the ball away, and it was Ian Johnson who discovered largely why.

“He had his doubts about the pitch, measured it and found it was only twenty yards. From that point onwards the Australians bowled from two yards behind the crease and everybody was happy.”

An 18-year-old who saw the match live from a crowd of 20,000 which, according to The Janashakthi Book of Sri Lanka Cricket, occupied every inch of space right up to boundary line, has a slightly different account. That 18-year-old was Chandra Schaffter, of the Tamil Union Club, who played three first-class matches in the fifties and also hockey for Ceylon. “Bradman, I think with all his experience, realised it was short, and he was the one who pointed it out,” says Schaffter. “He mentioned it to the umpires, they measured it again, and then rectified it.” Take your own pick, Fingleton’s realism, or Schaffter’s romanticism.

Regardless of what happened and how it happened, the match - a “whistle-stop tour” - was a huge event in Sri Lanka. “It was like Michael Jackson coming,” says Schaffter. As soon as they came to know Bradman would play, March 31, 1948 became a big day in Ceylonese cricket.

Sri Lanka had an advantage, vis-à-vis India, in that teams had to pass through the country when going back home from long tours. The ship would stop here for a day, and the cricket board would entertain the sea-locked cricketers with a day of cricket.

When the Invincibles were on their way back from England, the Ceylon team put behind them the huge controversy surrounding the captaincy, between FC de Saram and Mahadevan Sathasivam. “There wasn’t a hint of tension or dissension in the Ceylon ranks,” writes SS Perera in the Janashakthi Book.

“It was a chance for Sri Lanka to see the foreign players, and for our players to play against those cricketers,” recalls Schaffter. “We didn’t have any other international cricketers playing here. We had a Gopalan Trophy, the odd Holkar side coming, but no international team at all. So this was full house, all tickets were sold.”

The visiting team was of course allowed to bat. They came to watch Bradman bat, not Ceylon. Of the match itself Schaffter remembers this: “Bradman didn’t score very much. Neil Harvey didn’t play. Sid Barnes played, but he started vomiting after too much of beer the last night. Arthur Morris also played. Keith Miller also played.

“Something happened, somewhere maybe in so much of excitement, maybe they measured it [the pitch] two yards too short. Unlike nowadays, those days the umpires never measured the pitch. Genuine mistake. You don’t prepare a 20-yard pitch to face Keith Miller.”

The excitement that Bradman’s visit brought, Schaffter says, is rivalled only by the West Indians’ trip in 1967, when Garry Sobers, Clive Lloyd and Basil Butcher scored centuries. “I don’t think anybody today will draw that kind of crowds,” says Schaffter. “Maybe people nowadays have other priorities.”

Sidharth Monga is an assistant editor at ESPNcricinfo

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Posted by Rohan Kelaart on (August 1, 2010, 15:37 GMT)

P Sara ( Ovel ) is in Colombo Sri Lanka. one of the oldest Cricket grounds. on this ground Sri Lanka registered their very first Test victory against India. also P Sara is the Home ground for Tamil Union Cricket Club where Muttiah Muralitharan is playing.

Posted by CricketPissek on (July 25, 2010, 18:56 GMT)

very nice article. @murtaza - What exactly are you complaining about? The P Sara oval has been used for a looong time in Sri Lanka. It used to be called the "Colombo Oval" and then later changed its name to the P. Saravanamuththu Stadium. Since the SSC and R. Premadasa Stadium are also in Colombo, it was difficult to justify spending millions to maintain the P. Sara as a Test Venue for the club Tamil Union.

@Sowri Rajan - Michael Jackson was an amazing singer and super star! Try looking for videos of him visiting India to see how people react to him!

Posted by nalin ranasinghe on (July 24, 2010, 20:03 GMT)

Bradman did play in the 1930 fixture against Ceylon. . He scored 40 runs and was bowled out by Neil Joseph.

Posted by steadman mignon on (July 24, 2010, 19:13 GMT)

Looking at Bradman's bat; how flimsy it looks; i suppose if he battes with todays bat he would have averaged two hundred

Posted by Sowri Rajan on (July 24, 2010, 6:43 GMT)

It was a poor comparison between Bradman and Michael Jackson. Bradman was a thorough gentleman and a legend. Certainly Michael Jackson did not have any qualification to be compared with Bradman.

Posted by murtaza on (July 24, 2010, 4:21 GMT)

where is P Sara Oval, and why its not been used til now. and again just trying to show Bradman´s name on historical ground. please stop this

Posted by Kris Krishnadasan on (July 24, 2010, 0:50 GMT)

I agree with Sri Lankan Captain Sangakkara that Sri Lanka is playing far less test cricket than other countries. Why should Australia and England be allowed to play 5 Ashes Tests every other year. Other countries like South Africa, West Indies & India are also playing more test matches than other countries. I remember ICC - CEO Haroon Logart, when he took office, made a statement to the effect that from the year 2010 all test playing nations should play 12 test matches per year. Has this been implimented yet? If not why? Unless all the test playing nations play equal number of tests per year, it is very difficult to understand the ranking system, and thereby presently certain countries get unfair advantage over other countries who play less tests. Come On ICC get your act together....Kris

Posted by Kavi on (July 24, 2010, 0:30 GMT)

wow

Posted by Douglas Newsam on (July 23, 2010, 22:08 GMT)

it is accounts of memories such as these that will keep the spirit and game of cricket alive for as long as there are people in the world! Thanks you for this account of a rare moment in the career of Sir Donald Bradman and Ceylonese/Sri Lankan cricket.

Posted by Deepanjan Datta on (July 23, 2010, 19:08 GMT)

Beautiful account! It is moments like this which make following the game worth it ... Thanks for sharing :)

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