DRS June 15, 2011

An outbreak of verbal diarrhoea

Saturday, 11th June This summer there will be no T-shaped gesturing, no slow handclapping from the crowd and no sheepish-looking umpires changing their minds
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Saturday, 11th June This summer there will be no T-shaped gesturing, no slow handclapping from the crowd and no sheepish-looking umpires changing their minds. Though the rest of the cricket world has gone DRS crazy, India continue to oppose it with Trott-like stubbornness, for reasons that are not entirely clear. It remains one of the sport’s enduring mysteries, like why professional sportsmen can’t play on wet grass, and how exactly a game of cricket is enhanced by having young women dancing near to it.

We know that Dhoni and Tendulkar regard the DRS with the same suspicion with which a family cat might greet the introduction of an automatic cat-food dispenser. Personally, I agree with them. I like the old-school thrill of middle-aged men in silly hats making snap decisions. Since in any given match, I don’t much mind who wins, to me, umpiring booboos are just a wobbly thread in cricket’s tapestry.

But if accuracy is your thing, then DRS works. And this summer we need it more than ever. Last time India toured these shores, there was plenty of tasty cricket, but we were also served several helpings of silliness, a side order of stupidity, and a light sprinkling of jelly beans. Any series featuring Sreesanth, Harbhajan, Prior and Broad is likely to have a touch of the school playground about it, and without DRS, we can expect toys to be ejected from prams with monotonous regularity.

Monday 13th June At a time when Asian cricket boards are being encouraged to extricate themselves from the clammy embrace of the political class, the Australian defence minister has struck a blow for his kind. He has condemned the decision to deprive Simon Katich of his central contract as an atrocity. And he’s right. Chalk one up to the politicians.

“Simon has been a fantastic player, but we felt it was right to start blooding our next opening partnership in preparation for the Ashes.”

So says Andrew Hilditch. “Next opening partnership” is an impressive phase, implying that the Aussie talent factory has turned out yet another batch of world-class top-order batsmen, and that crusty old Kat has been swept aside by progress. It is slightly less impressive when you discover that what it means in practice is a recall for Phil “Step Back And Swipe” Hughes, the world’s leading bouncer magnet.

But the problem goes beyond Hilditch and Co. Cricket Australia is clearly suffering from Sick Organisation Syndrome, the symptoms of which are an outbreak of verbal diarrhoea and a rash of fake business-style job titles. Titles such as “Head of Cricket Operations”. Surely this should be Michael Clarke? Apparently not. Presumably he is only “Head of (Onfield) Cricket Operations”.

Anyway, this is how the Head of Cricket Operations described their selection set-up.

“You’ve got to have the best people, the best structures, the best position description for them…”

Well, if you like. Or you could just get a bunch of former pros together every so often and ask them to write down a list of the best dozen Test players in the country. A list that includes Simon Katich.

Andrew Hughes is a writer currently based in England

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • Tarun on June 29, 2011, 11:06 GMT

    Those who are commenting on Tendulkar's doubt on the DRS and praying that he should get a "Howler" should know that he is one of those batsmen who have suffered the most number of wrong decisions, and still he is against DRS without Hot-Spot because he sincerely doubts the accuracy of the Hawk-Eye.

  • Raj on June 24, 2011, 13:29 GMT

    The umpires should use technology to take decision if they are in doubt just like runout, but now-a-days I can see Umpires are seeking the help of technology for simple runout, probably they want to be on wrong side and earn public ire. Placing a cap of referrals handicaps the system, so better not use it

  • Arun on June 18, 2011, 17:45 GMT

    guys... the talkings like india losing to England is unfair.... we all know how england was 1 yr..ago.. so a team now certainly in good form cant be beating everyone on its way.. india is really good competitor in all forms of tha game.. they didn't play toy cricket to grab the No.1 spot in test... and trott ,Strauss, cook and so called Talkative popular "Swann" are all not greats of cricket.. here in india.. there r many who proved many times.. so Swann.. stop chewing your empty mouth.. u better .. concentrate on your spin bowling..men like Great shane warne.. paid respect to this country... when it was not that as good as now in CRICKET.. so u better watch out.. this is a strong comment on england .. "ENGLAND PLAY the game on the field.. not on media.. don't cry for DRS system...

  • sree on June 17, 2011, 18:16 GMT

    there is something with Guru Greg. Whereever he goes, senior cricketers get booted out and teams end up in a mess.

  • Alfred on June 17, 2011, 0:37 GMT

    About the Australian selection thing - Absolutely right. Amazing how satirists are often more right than reality innit? Cracking article Andrew!

  • Ramesh-IT on June 16, 2011, 13:29 GMT

    @Bowks: Ya the Asian contingent always complains for the lack of reference of their players in any article. Just like the Poms boasting " We are the Ashes champions" or the Aussies shouting out "Hussey is Mr.Cricket". Every needle has a hole.

  • Prasad on June 16, 2011, 9:26 GMT

    @Bowks This is a complaint from the asian contingent on the lack of reference to Sachin, VVS, Rahul or Shahid. Satisfied? Now tuck in your bib and finish your peas...

  • Aina on June 16, 2011, 7:44 GMT

    @Bowks: Count us out please. We don't mention Shahid Afridi anywhere he's not being discussed. Andrew manages to get quite a few valid points across in the guise of humour. Excellent article!

  • Harxal on June 16, 2011, 6:51 GMT

    What nonsense...how can the author criticize SACHIN THE GOD of Cricket?????? IF he says NO to DRS then its a NO!!!........just kidding!...the fact is Indian batsmen are scared of their inflated averages coming down drastically.

  • dove on June 16, 2011, 6:32 GMT

    The real reasons DRS is opposed is

    1) Ball tracking is NOT accurate with spin and late swing, only with fast straight balls. If the software can draw a pretty line on TV does not mean its real. Why let a software make guesses (as decided by some programmers) when a real umpire with infinitely more experience can do it

    2) DRS technologies cost a BOMB!! and BCCI is concerned that this is a bit of a scam where they are being overcharged with the connivance of some of the boards whose countrymen have developed the tech.

    DRS will become acceptable for India when either an indian company makes such equipment (patent ?) or the tech vendors cut a deal with BCCI instead of being all high and mighty. The idiots refused to send hot spot for world cup saying it has duel use for military application and india might steal it. Right!, indian military needs to steal from a bunch of cricket equipment makers. Once these companies take their heads out of their asses, DRS will be accepted by BCCI.

  • Tarun on June 29, 2011, 11:06 GMT

    Those who are commenting on Tendulkar's doubt on the DRS and praying that he should get a "Howler" should know that he is one of those batsmen who have suffered the most number of wrong decisions, and still he is against DRS without Hot-Spot because he sincerely doubts the accuracy of the Hawk-Eye.

  • Raj on June 24, 2011, 13:29 GMT

    The umpires should use technology to take decision if they are in doubt just like runout, but now-a-days I can see Umpires are seeking the help of technology for simple runout, probably they want to be on wrong side and earn public ire. Placing a cap of referrals handicaps the system, so better not use it

  • Arun on June 18, 2011, 17:45 GMT

    guys... the talkings like india losing to England is unfair.... we all know how england was 1 yr..ago.. so a team now certainly in good form cant be beating everyone on its way.. india is really good competitor in all forms of tha game.. they didn't play toy cricket to grab the No.1 spot in test... and trott ,Strauss, cook and so called Talkative popular "Swann" are all not greats of cricket.. here in india.. there r many who proved many times.. so Swann.. stop chewing your empty mouth.. u better .. concentrate on your spin bowling..men like Great shane warne.. paid respect to this country... when it was not that as good as now in CRICKET.. so u better watch out.. this is a strong comment on england .. "ENGLAND PLAY the game on the field.. not on media.. don't cry for DRS system...

  • sree on June 17, 2011, 18:16 GMT

    there is something with Guru Greg. Whereever he goes, senior cricketers get booted out and teams end up in a mess.

  • Alfred on June 17, 2011, 0:37 GMT

    About the Australian selection thing - Absolutely right. Amazing how satirists are often more right than reality innit? Cracking article Andrew!

  • Ramesh-IT on June 16, 2011, 13:29 GMT

    @Bowks: Ya the Asian contingent always complains for the lack of reference of their players in any article. Just like the Poms boasting " We are the Ashes champions" or the Aussies shouting out "Hussey is Mr.Cricket". Every needle has a hole.

  • Prasad on June 16, 2011, 9:26 GMT

    @Bowks This is a complaint from the asian contingent on the lack of reference to Sachin, VVS, Rahul or Shahid. Satisfied? Now tuck in your bib and finish your peas...

  • Aina on June 16, 2011, 7:44 GMT

    @Bowks: Count us out please. We don't mention Shahid Afridi anywhere he's not being discussed. Andrew manages to get quite a few valid points across in the guise of humour. Excellent article!

  • Harxal on June 16, 2011, 6:51 GMT

    What nonsense...how can the author criticize SACHIN THE GOD of Cricket?????? IF he says NO to DRS then its a NO!!!........just kidding!...the fact is Indian batsmen are scared of their inflated averages coming down drastically.

  • dove on June 16, 2011, 6:32 GMT

    The real reasons DRS is opposed is

    1) Ball tracking is NOT accurate with spin and late swing, only with fast straight balls. If the software can draw a pretty line on TV does not mean its real. Why let a software make guesses (as decided by some programmers) when a real umpire with infinitely more experience can do it

    2) DRS technologies cost a BOMB!! and BCCI is concerned that this is a bit of a scam where they are being overcharged with the connivance of some of the boards whose countrymen have developed the tech.

    DRS will become acceptable for India when either an indian company makes such equipment (patent ?) or the tech vendors cut a deal with BCCI instead of being all high and mighty. The idiots refused to send hot spot for world cup saying it has duel use for military application and india might steal it. Right!, indian military needs to steal from a bunch of cricket equipment makers. Once these companies take their heads out of their asses, DRS will be accepted by BCCI.

  • Nick on June 16, 2011, 5:44 GMT

    UDRS may help getting more correct decisions even though it does not guarantee it, it doesn't not make the game equally fair based on performance and hardwork done by players but leave them looking for big screen. It also looks embarrassing for our best umpires like Taufel, Dar, Bowden, Gould when they reverse their decision again and again it may make them more nervous and result even more wrong decisions. If we want to use technology, we should take full advantage of it and the teams should be allowed to go for review as many times as they want otherwise there is no need of UDRS or at least ICC can try it. I am sure India won't deny to try such rule.

  • Nick on June 16, 2011, 5:24 GMT

    The rules for UDRS should be like letting the Umpires go for third umpire whenever they have very much doubt on their own decisions even for lbws. Giving just two chances to the teams are not enough.

  • Nick on June 16, 2011, 5:21 GMT

    The UDRS give an advantage to review the decisions but comes with a lot of disadvantages too. The result should of a match should be based on performance not on luck by who gets more right reviews at right time and win the match. We already have extremely good umpires likes of Simon Taufel, Aleem Dar, Billy Bowden and Ian Gould who hardly make any mistake. It's technology and rule has to be improved before fully implementing it in in cricket.

  • Nick on June 16, 2011, 5:18 GMT

    UDRS allows only 2 chances to both teams which seems fair at first but it’s not necessarily fair enough, giving 2 chances means if the teams lose their reviews there can’t be anything done for the latter wrong decisions made by the Umpires. Indian team cannot be fully blamed for UDRS being not fully implemented in cricket. If it causes problem to other teams, the same is for them too. ICC should be capable of taking its own decision. We should use technology if it helps to make the sport better and fair but not to give unfair advantages and disadvantages to the teams.

  • Nick on June 16, 2011, 5:16 GMT

    There are enough doubts in UDRS and its rule for not using it. In the recent world cup we saw a controversial decision in a match between India and England where an LBW decision against batsman Ian Bell was not given out after India referred the decision despite the hawk-eye clearly showing the ball would have hit the mid-wicket but because of the then rule that if the ball travels more than 2.5 metres from point of impact to the stumps it would not be reversed which proves ICC itself had not full trust on technology.

  • Nick on June 16, 2011, 5:12 GMT

    Indians do have a point for refusing UDRS. You can use the tecnology to challenge the umpire’s decision but the question is whether the tecnology is good enough to be used because no one can deny the fact that it doesn’t guarantee accurate decisions. There have been some controversials decisions in the matches it has been used and also where players sometimes have been able to deceive the technology and take advantage of it. In Ashes series in a match an English batsman Ian Bell edged the ball and was caught out. Everyone saw and heard the noise, replays showed that his bat was at fair distance from his pad and the sound could only be made by the contact of bat and ball, But he refused to walk out and escaped when hotspot couldn’t show the contact between bat and ball though later contact was confirmed by snicko. So there are need of improvements in the technology before making it compulsory in all international matches.

  • Ramana on June 16, 2011, 3:41 GMT

    That a team wins a cricket test series because of or lack of technology is absolute rubbish. If you have good bowlers and batters and if some aging guys resting in slips catch most of the offerings then you will win. I also dont understand how technology can enhance spectator interest, sounds silly to me. In the end can the Indian batsmen stand up to the slightly above average Engish attack? Can the English batsmen take advantage of the slightly below average Indian attack? This will decide the series.

  • Ravi Kumar on June 16, 2011, 1:05 GMT

    Readers here assume DRS is a proven technology. While it does a nice job showing the path the ball could have travelled, that alone does not guarantee the system's accuracy. The ball certainly can take a different path due to factors that are not accounted by the software. This is a fact known to all technologists.

    Another issue here is the man versus the machine problem. On occassion where the system overrides the on-field umpire's best judgement, the decision process gets more complicated and not necessarily simplified.

    That players like Sachin and Dhoni who have fairly greater experience in the ways of the cricketing world have given their thoughts and they need to be given some consideration too. Tremlett or Swannie who have broken into their test side in recent times have to give that a consideration!

    The real question is, when someone quotes, "the rest of the world accepts and embraces DRS", they will have to explain who the rest of the world is, to me

  • Damon SHarwood on June 15, 2011, 23:45 GMT

    Andy Hughes has it spot on regarding the corpporatisation of Cricket Australia. James Sutherland is a middle manager who dreams of P& L sheets and bottom lines. And any organisation that allows Andrew Hilditch and Greg Chappell to be involved in selection is massively flawed. The dropping of Katich is the best example, especially when justified on the basis of creating the "next opening partnership for the 2013 Ashes". What ever happened to picking the best 11 cricketers ? Never heard of such garbled nonsense. And Chappell's brilliance as a batsman has never rubbed off on him as a coach or selector. Get rid of these three and things and things will only start to improve.

  • Emmad Sharif on June 15, 2011, 23:32 GMT

    I always associate verbal diarrhea with LeBron James

  • Jignesh on June 15, 2011, 18:47 GMT

    Sabri Wahid wrote that Australia demanded respect. Which is absolutely not true. Respect horse shit. Don't you forget the under arm bowling incident, Dennis Lilee once used metal bat and when umpire told him to get rid of it, he got angry on umpires and abused them. Don't you forget the legend-Shane Warne used drug before one of the world cups and caught and got kicked out of the entire world cup. Don't you forget Ricky Ponting broke the LCD TV in India in anger of failure. They have done a lot more things that no one else could even think about it. So, please don't put 2 words together as Australia and Respect.

  • Sunny on June 15, 2011, 18:42 GMT

    Prahlad...dude...you are right on. That is one insufferable human being.

  • Sunny on June 15, 2011, 18:41 GMT

    One would think Dhoni and especially Sachin will change his mind, after the WC 2011 QF let off against Saeed Ajmal. Oh well. It would be interesting to see how many times India under Dhoni benefited due to umpiring mistakes, than the number of times India suffered. That might explain this stubbornness.

  • Sri on June 15, 2011, 17:01 GMT

    I find it pretty funny tat some readers post tat Indians will repent if they loose matches due to poor onfield umpiring...for ur kind info...we have been at the loosing end quite a number of times due to poor umpiring(2008 sydney test is a classic example)...its alltogether pretty silly to bring up a point as to how the BCCI mind changes because of poor on field umpiring....

  • Raks on June 15, 2011, 14:49 GMT

    @Bowks - did u read the article half way down?

  • Anonymous on June 15, 2011, 14:13 GMT

    Haha, "worlds leading bouncer magnet". It really is a poor decision by CA and as an Englishman I do take a degree of sadistic satisfaction in the steady decline of Australian cricket. The Indian refusal to use the DRS, and the rest of the cricket worlds inability to tell the BCCI to get stuffed, sickens me. I can only hope Tendulkar and Dhoni get at least one absolute howler each and see if their opinions change then

  • Sunit Saraswat on June 15, 2011, 13:53 GMT

    Siddhu was the first to be struck by Verbal diarrhoea. No Doctor or quack has been able to cure him of it, not even his dear wife who is a very good doctor.Harsha....not sure. But since he has taken to writing books, he might just rediscover the power of brevity.

    A theory doing the rounds of non-acceptance of DRS is that Sachin does not like it, he is God and God knows mortals will give him the benefit of doubt more than the machine.

  • GSN on June 15, 2011, 13:37 GMT

    At times, even the stumping and runout decisions referred to the third umpire are not 100% fool proof. Remember the line decisions in which one frame shows the bat before the crease and the next one beyond the line. In those cases the benefit of the doubt is given to the batsmen. I guess since the benefit of the doubt is given to the umpire (as for marginal decisions umpire's decision is taken final) under DRS, India think tank is opposing it. Give the benefit of the doubt to the batsmen and Indians will pounce on it

  • NJH on June 15, 2011, 12:12 GMT

    India do not want technology so they can blame the umpires when they lose to England!!

  • sajjid on June 15, 2011, 12:11 GMT

    If it wasn't for DRS, India would not be the world champions. Remember Tendulker getting a reprieve against Pak in the semi-final?

  • veerajai on June 15, 2011, 12:06 GMT

    People like Swann, Tremlet and this author and scores of others who are commenting on India's opposition to Referral system are not getting the exact point it seems. Indians, obviously including Sachin & MS aren't against the whole system but are opposing only non foolproof system. What is the use of hawkeye if it can not decide beyond 4.5mtrs. Can they ensure DRS with Hawk eye, hotspot and snicko metre. What progress has been made on 4.5 mtr. issue till date??Already we are suffering with non foolproof DL system. It has been decades since DL is in vogue and no research has been done on that. Just only recently some experimentation is goind the Jayadevan system. Why hurry with half baked knowledge of technology. Better concentrate on research regarding technology for LBWs. Better stop India basing for each and every thing. We are not World champions and No.1 without DRS. We are so inspite of it. Undoubtedly Sachin and MS ar beter knowledged and experienced than Swan and Tremlett

  • Pankaj Singh on June 15, 2011, 11:50 GMT

    Amazing Mr. Hughes nice support for UDRS but unfortunately nor for cricket. India is not backing UDRS just because it will be to much interference in a game like cricket. We all have been playing cricket but do not you think that the inherent thrill in the game is responsible for expansion of this sport. This inherent thrill is responsible for the excitement both for players as well as viewers. UDRS is supposed to harm that thrill without which cricket will be nothing but just ball bat and machine.

  • jimmy777 on June 15, 2011, 11:41 GMT

    its pay back time, when australia & england boards were dominating the world cricket in the 80s & 90s everybody kept quite, so why all are raising their voice, the english countries are tasting their own medicine, loving cricket these days, india dominating world cricket on & off the field.

  • Ramesh-IT on June 15, 2011, 11:25 GMT

    @Bowks: Ya, I agree. The same way in which the Poms shout out "WE ARE THE WINNERS OF ASHES" or the Aussies boasting "Mike Hussey is the best player the game has ever known" for every article in reference to any cricket series never care whether it is International or domestic. Every needle has a hole.

  • Prahlad on June 15, 2011, 10:44 GMT

    For some reason (!) I always associate verbal diarrhoea with Harsha Bhogle.

  • Sumit Sahai on June 15, 2011, 10:15 GMT

    If the ICC cannot enforce standard rules of engagement across all Tests, ODI and T20, then different countries will impose their own will, in proportion to their clout. Hence this stubborn refusal to use DRS by a group of luddites in the Indian camp, who object to DRS not being 100% accurate or fool proof. The only thing that will change their minds is a series of matches where they lose due to umpiring howlers. That might persuade them that a 95% accurate DRS is better than a 90% accurate umpire without DRS.

    Come back Bucknor and Asoka DSilva, all is forgiven.

  • Abi on June 15, 2011, 9:16 GMT

    I know senior Indian players like Sachin and Dhoni do not really like DRS but then there are others like Sehwag who is pro- DRS. Now the reason given for opposing DRS is that, it is not full proof and they do not regard Hawk-Eye as a reliable technology adding Hot- Spot was more reliable. I believe, however, Hot-Spot technology is available in this tour? I'm afraid this stubbornness is going to take some spice out of the tour. And I wonder if Bucknor happens to India again in this tour, who will they blame it on?

    -Abi, Bangalore.

  • Bowks on June 15, 2011, 9:09 GMT

    Very good but I am a little disturbed that the asian contingent of the readership haven't commented on the lack of reference to Sachin, VVS, Rahul or Shahid. Very shoddy work.

  • Sabri Wahid on June 15, 2011, 8:05 GMT

    Australia were once a team who oozed confidence and demanded respect. But now they together with SriLanka are having a sprint towards who would be the next Pakistan, not in terms of unpredictability but a feeling of messiness. Katich has a few more years of cricket in him, certainly enough to last till the next Ashes and he along with Watson could be groomed into a formidable opening pair, i.e. if they were not one already, for the next Ashes. Sad to see such a good player reduced to this.

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  • Sabri Wahid on June 15, 2011, 8:05 GMT

    Australia were once a team who oozed confidence and demanded respect. But now they together with SriLanka are having a sprint towards who would be the next Pakistan, not in terms of unpredictability but a feeling of messiness. Katich has a few more years of cricket in him, certainly enough to last till the next Ashes and he along with Watson could be groomed into a formidable opening pair, i.e. if they were not one already, for the next Ashes. Sad to see such a good player reduced to this.

  • Bowks on June 15, 2011, 9:09 GMT

    Very good but I am a little disturbed that the asian contingent of the readership haven't commented on the lack of reference to Sachin, VVS, Rahul or Shahid. Very shoddy work.

  • Abi on June 15, 2011, 9:16 GMT

    I know senior Indian players like Sachin and Dhoni do not really like DRS but then there are others like Sehwag who is pro- DRS. Now the reason given for opposing DRS is that, it is not full proof and they do not regard Hawk-Eye as a reliable technology adding Hot- Spot was more reliable. I believe, however, Hot-Spot technology is available in this tour? I'm afraid this stubbornness is going to take some spice out of the tour. And I wonder if Bucknor happens to India again in this tour, who will they blame it on?

    -Abi, Bangalore.

  • Sumit Sahai on June 15, 2011, 10:15 GMT

    If the ICC cannot enforce standard rules of engagement across all Tests, ODI and T20, then different countries will impose their own will, in proportion to their clout. Hence this stubborn refusal to use DRS by a group of luddites in the Indian camp, who object to DRS not being 100% accurate or fool proof. The only thing that will change their minds is a series of matches where they lose due to umpiring howlers. That might persuade them that a 95% accurate DRS is better than a 90% accurate umpire without DRS.

    Come back Bucknor and Asoka DSilva, all is forgiven.

  • Prahlad on June 15, 2011, 10:44 GMT

    For some reason (!) I always associate verbal diarrhoea with Harsha Bhogle.

  • Ramesh-IT on June 15, 2011, 11:25 GMT

    @Bowks: Ya, I agree. The same way in which the Poms shout out "WE ARE THE WINNERS OF ASHES" or the Aussies boasting "Mike Hussey is the best player the game has ever known" for every article in reference to any cricket series never care whether it is International or domestic. Every needle has a hole.

  • jimmy777 on June 15, 2011, 11:41 GMT

    its pay back time, when australia & england boards were dominating the world cricket in the 80s & 90s everybody kept quite, so why all are raising their voice, the english countries are tasting their own medicine, loving cricket these days, india dominating world cricket on & off the field.

  • Pankaj Singh on June 15, 2011, 11:50 GMT

    Amazing Mr. Hughes nice support for UDRS but unfortunately nor for cricket. India is not backing UDRS just because it will be to much interference in a game like cricket. We all have been playing cricket but do not you think that the inherent thrill in the game is responsible for expansion of this sport. This inherent thrill is responsible for the excitement both for players as well as viewers. UDRS is supposed to harm that thrill without which cricket will be nothing but just ball bat and machine.

  • veerajai on June 15, 2011, 12:06 GMT

    People like Swann, Tremlet and this author and scores of others who are commenting on India's opposition to Referral system are not getting the exact point it seems. Indians, obviously including Sachin & MS aren't against the whole system but are opposing only non foolproof system. What is the use of hawkeye if it can not decide beyond 4.5mtrs. Can they ensure DRS with Hawk eye, hotspot and snicko metre. What progress has been made on 4.5 mtr. issue till date??Already we are suffering with non foolproof DL system. It has been decades since DL is in vogue and no research has been done on that. Just only recently some experimentation is goind the Jayadevan system. Why hurry with half baked knowledge of technology. Better concentrate on research regarding technology for LBWs. Better stop India basing for each and every thing. We are not World champions and No.1 without DRS. We are so inspite of it. Undoubtedly Sachin and MS ar beter knowledged and experienced than Swan and Tremlett

  • sajjid on June 15, 2011, 12:11 GMT

    If it wasn't for DRS, India would not be the world champions. Remember Tendulker getting a reprieve against Pak in the semi-final?