England v SA, Investec Test Series, The Oval July 18, 2012

Battle of the bowlers set to commence

George Dobell and Firdose Moonda
ESPNcricinfo runs the rule over the key battles that could decide the England v South Africa series
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James Anderson v Dale Steyn

A glance at the statistics might convince you there is no comparison here: while Steyn, rated as the No. 1 bowler in Test cricket at present, possesses the best strike-rate for any bowler with more than 250 Test wickets (he takes a wicket every 40.9 balls, on average), Anderson's Test bowling average remains above 30 and his strike-rate is 57.2. They have different styles, too. As Anderson put it, Steyn is "probably more aggressive, a bit quicker, he swings the ball late, probably a bit more attacking whereas my role is a holding job at times."

Yet, they also have much in common. Each will lead the attack for their side. Each will swing the new ball conventionally and reverse swing the old ball and each will pose huge problems for the opposition's top order.

Steyn is the quicker by some distance, but Anderson's skills, though more subtle, are no less dangerous. He has excellent control, he has the ability to seam and swing the ball both ways, and he has become adept at working to plans and exploiting batsmen's weaknesses. Over the last few years, Anderson's bowling Test average has dropped swiftly: up until the end of 2007, it was 39.20, but since then it is 27.28. He is currently rated No. 3 in the Test bowling rankings.

There is history here, too. At Leeds in 2008, Steyn gave Anderson a fearful barrage and hit him on the helmet with one bouncer. Anderson responded, unlikely though it sounds, by breaking Steyn's thumb with a fierce return drive. How each batting line-up deals with the challenge of Anderson and Steyn may go a long way to shaping the series.

Graeme Swann v Imran Tahir

On the face of it, Swann looks to have a clear advantage in the battle of the spinners. Despite being just three days older than Tahir, Swann has played 37 more Tests and has an excellent record in pretty much all conditions. He is rated No. 8 in the Test rankings and has helped revive the dying art of conventional off-spin. Swann's versatility is key for England. Even on pitches offering him little, he has the discipline and control to allow his captain to rest and rotate the seamers. His record against left-handers is exceptional.

Tahir's Test record looks modest. He has played only seven Tests and has yet to excel. While he his blessed with all the variations a leg-spin bowler requires, there are some doubts about his patience and ability to fulfil a containing role when required. His experience in English conditions should help, though. He has represented four counties and, as a first-class strike-rate of 47.5 shows, has a fine record as an attacking spin bowler. Given some help from the pitches - something he has not enjoyed so far in his Test career - he could prove a dangerous bowler for an England side with a chequered record of playing good-quality spin. If England can get after him, however, it will be interesting to see how Smith handles the situation.

Andrew Strauss v Graeme Smith

Two experienced men who, as opening batsmen, lead from the front but also face their own struggles with the bat. Smith's record in England is superb - he averages 72.20 in Tests here - and, as captain, he has already inflicted series defeats that played a part in the demise of two England captains, Michael Vaughan and Nasser Hussain. The Oval Test will be his 100th - his 99th for South Africa plus the ICC World XI Test in 2005 - and, while neither he nor Strauss are known for their tactical genius, they both offer leadership, stability and composure under pressure. Strauss will, injury permitting, play his 100th Test at Lord's.

Both have faced significant personal troubles with the bat though. Smith can struggle with his balance and, as a result, can be susceptible to the swinging ball early in his innings, while Strauss has recently returned to form after a long barren run that was beginning to threaten his place. How each of them weather the substantial challenges their opponents' new ball attacks will throw at them will not just ease the burden on the middle order, but may also have an impact on the morale of the respective dressing rooms.

Ravi Bopara v Jacques Rudolph

Bopara and Rudolph both impressed early in their Test careers, but then suffered setbacks and have waited a long time for their second opportunity. It may also prove that neither have too long to cement their positions. Bopara, who scored three successive centuries in his fourth, fifth and sixth Tests, has been on the edge of the England side for 18 months only for injury to intervene. Now, on the back of several encouraging performances in limited-overs cricket and having remained one of the class performers in the county game, he has another chance to revive a Test career that was almost destroyed in the Ashes of 2009. Now he has the chance to answer all the lingering questions about his talent and temperament. While not in the same class of bowler as Kallis, Bopara is also an underrated bowler who will ease the burden on England's seamers.

Rudolph, meanwhile, returned to the South Africa side in November after five years developing his game in county cricket. Despite making a double-century on Test debut in 2003, questions remain about his ability to deal with the short ball, the moving ball and his concentration. He has only once passed 52 in his eight Tests since returning to Test cricket.

AB de Villiers the batsman v AB de Villiers the 'keeper

It seems that for at least the first Test, de Villiers will face double the workload. He is set to bat at No. 5 and wear the wicket-keeping gloves. With a history of back problems, he has already started preventative physiotherapy to stop anything before it starts, but knows he will have to be extra careful. He has already done the job in ODIs and Twenty20s, including in the IPL, and it has aided rather than inhibited his batting. Doing it for prolonged periods of time, as he will have to in a Test match, is a different matter.

There is some fear that de Villiers will not be able to maintain his form in a crucial position in the line-up, something he hinted at himself just over two years ago when he said his main goal was to be the world's best batsman and that could mean abandoning ambitions of being a wicketkeeper as well. This time, he has no choice. With Mark Boucher's enforced retirement and team management against rushing the specialist Thami Tsolekile into the starting XI, de Villiers will have twin responsibilities and how he manages them could be series-defining for South Africa.

Vernon Philander v expectation

Being up against it is nothing new to Philander. He was expected him to bomb out in his Test debut, he responded with 5 for 15 against Australia. He was expected to toil without success at the Wanderers, he responded with another five-wicket haul. He was expected to fizzle out against Sri Lanka but two more five-fors came and when he was expected to make less of an impact in New Zealand, he become the fastest bowler to 50 Test wickets in over a hundred years. Now, Philander is again thought to have a point to prove, this time against the world's No. 1 ranked Test side and in conditions he has only known briefly. He isn't fazed by the new challenge and insists that if he sticks to his line outside off and is able to make use of movement, the rest will come. Obviously.

Slip cordon v slip cordon

James Anderson said that a brilliant one-handed catch may be what decides the series. Jacques Kallis was more general and said "key moments" would separate the teams. The margins could well be in the slips, where England have let a few through and South Africa have been known to hang on. England put down three catches in the third Test against West Indies and have been questioned for the lapses in that department. South Africa's trio usually consists of Graeme Smith, Kallis and de Villiers, but with de Villiers likely to take the gloves, Jacques Rudolph will probably move into third slip. It will mean a change from the norm but with Mile Young conducting the fielding drills, it is unlikely to mean any drop in the usual standards.

Pietersen v Kallis

The bowling attacks have dominated pre-series hype but for bowlers to achieve success, batsmen have to fail. Therefore whoever manages not to may well have the deciding say in the contest. Pietersen and Kallis are totally different batsmen, in approach, technique and mindset, but both are key to their sides' chances. South Africa have identified Pietersen as the man to get out early not because he is capable of scoring bit runs but because he is able to do that quickly, which could throw the bowlers off their plans. Nothing fires him up like playing against the country of his birth and Pietersen will want to make a statement against them, again. Kallis has been South Africa's immovable pillar for more than 15 years but his record in England leaves something to be desired. On what is likely his last visit to the country, he will want to leave having made an impact in the only way he knows how - with the bat.

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • jmcilhinney on July 19, 2012, 18:36 GMT

    @Dave Lowe on (July 19 2012, 15:14 PM GMT), now I'm the one laughing. jonesy2... reasoning? You must have him mixed up with someone who knows something about cricket.

  • on July 19, 2012, 15:14 GMT

    Jonesy2. Would like to see your list of the 10 bowlers in the world who are better than Jimmy Anderson and your reasoning for believing that?

  • mikey76 on July 19, 2012, 14:57 GMT

    John Ide. Hardly SA first against SA second when only 2 of Englands top 7 are South African. You need to do research before commenting. Jonesy2 the overated Anderson took 24 wickets against your boys and is fast closing in on 300 wickets. You clearly live in a parallel universe where that is considered average!

  • CamS71 on July 19, 2012, 12:49 GMT

    @Walter Aussems on (July 19 2012, 08:05 AM GMT): The Broad you describe has gone my friend. In the last 2 years (since he sorted himself out) he's taken over 60 wickets at around 23. Do your research please.

  • RednWhiteArmy on July 19, 2012, 12:12 GMT

    Its sooo good for england to finally have abit of a challenge after that rather pathetic effort by the "green & yellow"

    Australia should give up.

  • JG2704 on July 19, 2012, 10:20 GMT

    @Walter Aussems on (July 19 2012, 08:05 AM GMT) Big Broad fan then? Re hissy fits - did you see the ODI 4th ODI when he had 2 dropped off him and his reaction was a wry smile. Re talent/performances - we got our number 1 test ranking when we beat India 4-0 and who was man of the series?

  • ballonbat on July 19, 2012, 8:35 GMT

    " in the only way he knows ... the bat." Patent nonsense. Everyone who follows cricket knows that Jacques Kallis is one of the finest allrounders ever to have played cricket. Apart from his topnotch batting - "the BEST way he knows how" rather than "only" - there's his solid bowling (at 276 wickets he has taken more Test wickets than any of the specialist bowlers in both squads and at a good average) and he is a brilliant slip fielder (181 catches).

    Granted, Kallis has been playing far longer than any of those bowlers, so of course he's going to rack up the numbers. But first he HAS taken those wickets and some top quality batsmen too and second he usually bowls as fifth bowler in short stints to keep him fresh for batting: on average he bowls 12 overs per innings as opposed to the frontline bowlers' 19 to 22.

    It is no surprise that Kallis, with his longevity, has racked up these numbers, but they are still testament to the fact he has more strings to his bow than batting alone.

  • JG2704 on July 19, 2012, 8:26 GMT

    @John Ide on (July 19 2012, 04:28 AM GMT) It was actually 3-1 but if you want to give us an extra test we'll take it. There are loads who distort the facts the other way

  • on July 19, 2012, 8:05 GMT

    @Hammond The only reason the english bowling lineup is so potent is due to Anderson(whos improved massively the last few years) Swan(prolly the most wiley bowler on earth atm) and the third seamer. Broad is a liability and has been carried on many occasion. Sure hes taken wickets, as the law of averages would suggest, but hes not even close to what the rest of the english team bring to the table. Throw in his short temper(or hissy fits) when the going gets tough and you have nothing short of a spoilt brat in your team. Personally id rather see him dropped and have Finn in his place.

  • jmcilhinney on July 19, 2012, 7:46 GMT

    I think that it's fair to say that Steyn is the best bowler in the world but I do think that many underrate Anderson's current form by looking at career stats that are definitely pulled down by a slow start. Not that the same couldn't be said of Steyn perhaps, but I think that many England fans would agree that often it is the other England bowlers who reap the rewards statistically of Anderson's contribution. Suffice it to say that they are both very good at their job and we should consider ourselves lucky to see them both playing in the same match.

  • jmcilhinney on July 19, 2012, 18:36 GMT

    @Dave Lowe on (July 19 2012, 15:14 PM GMT), now I'm the one laughing. jonesy2... reasoning? You must have him mixed up with someone who knows something about cricket.

  • on July 19, 2012, 15:14 GMT

    Jonesy2. Would like to see your list of the 10 bowlers in the world who are better than Jimmy Anderson and your reasoning for believing that?

  • mikey76 on July 19, 2012, 14:57 GMT

    John Ide. Hardly SA first against SA second when only 2 of Englands top 7 are South African. You need to do research before commenting. Jonesy2 the overated Anderson took 24 wickets against your boys and is fast closing in on 300 wickets. You clearly live in a parallel universe where that is considered average!

  • CamS71 on July 19, 2012, 12:49 GMT

    @Walter Aussems on (July 19 2012, 08:05 AM GMT): The Broad you describe has gone my friend. In the last 2 years (since he sorted himself out) he's taken over 60 wickets at around 23. Do your research please.

  • RednWhiteArmy on July 19, 2012, 12:12 GMT

    Its sooo good for england to finally have abit of a challenge after that rather pathetic effort by the "green & yellow"

    Australia should give up.

  • JG2704 on July 19, 2012, 10:20 GMT

    @Walter Aussems on (July 19 2012, 08:05 AM GMT) Big Broad fan then? Re hissy fits - did you see the ODI 4th ODI when he had 2 dropped off him and his reaction was a wry smile. Re talent/performances - we got our number 1 test ranking when we beat India 4-0 and who was man of the series?

  • ballonbat on July 19, 2012, 8:35 GMT

    " in the only way he knows ... the bat." Patent nonsense. Everyone who follows cricket knows that Jacques Kallis is one of the finest allrounders ever to have played cricket. Apart from his topnotch batting - "the BEST way he knows how" rather than "only" - there's his solid bowling (at 276 wickets he has taken more Test wickets than any of the specialist bowlers in both squads and at a good average) and he is a brilliant slip fielder (181 catches).

    Granted, Kallis has been playing far longer than any of those bowlers, so of course he's going to rack up the numbers. But first he HAS taken those wickets and some top quality batsmen too and second he usually bowls as fifth bowler in short stints to keep him fresh for batting: on average he bowls 12 overs per innings as opposed to the frontline bowlers' 19 to 22.

    It is no surprise that Kallis, with his longevity, has racked up these numbers, but they are still testament to the fact he has more strings to his bow than batting alone.

  • JG2704 on July 19, 2012, 8:26 GMT

    @John Ide on (July 19 2012, 04:28 AM GMT) It was actually 3-1 but if you want to give us an extra test we'll take it. There are loads who distort the facts the other way

  • on July 19, 2012, 8:05 GMT

    @Hammond The only reason the english bowling lineup is so potent is due to Anderson(whos improved massively the last few years) Swan(prolly the most wiley bowler on earth atm) and the third seamer. Broad is a liability and has been carried on many occasion. Sure hes taken wickets, as the law of averages would suggest, but hes not even close to what the rest of the english team bring to the table. Throw in his short temper(or hissy fits) when the going gets tough and you have nothing short of a spoilt brat in your team. Personally id rather see him dropped and have Finn in his place.

  • jmcilhinney on July 19, 2012, 7:46 GMT

    I think that it's fair to say that Steyn is the best bowler in the world but I do think that many underrate Anderson's current form by looking at career stats that are definitely pulled down by a slow start. Not that the same couldn't be said of Steyn perhaps, but I think that many England fans would agree that often it is the other England bowlers who reap the rewards statistically of Anderson's contribution. Suffice it to say that they are both very good at their job and we should consider ourselves lucky to see them both playing in the same match.

  • jonesy2 on July 19, 2012, 7:33 GMT

    i cant help but laugh at some of the comparisons especially the steyn v anderson one if i was anderson i would be incredibly embarrassed at that. anderson is not even a top 10 bowler in the world.

  • satish619chandar on July 19, 2012, 6:25 GMT

    What i look out is, the strength of the fast bowlers.. Both the attacks are equally good and potent to cause damage and it will be lovely to watch these attacks against each other.. Headed by Steyn and Anderson, both are just dream attacks.. Somewhere down the line, i would have preferred Harris over Tahir.. Not writing tahir off but still, with the capacity of attacking they have in fast bowlers, would have preferred a defensive and choking spinner over an attacking spinner who will give away crucial runs and there will be a need for a pace bowler to go into run containing mode.. If Tahir can be attacking and control the run flow at the same time, it will be great..

  • zenboomerang on July 19, 2012, 5:58 GMT

    @mikey76... Fully agree on the "its more important on where you grow up & learn your skills" (rather than where you are born or parents born)... Oz, NZ, Eng, SA have always had immigration, with many moving between the countries & is seen as a norm... Have many SA, Eng, NZ expat friends - makes for lots of fun during the rugby season, often at my expense...

  • Hammond on July 19, 2012, 5:45 GMT

    @maddy20- agreed- South Africa will definitely struggle against Anderson, Broad and Bresnan. Plus you didn't mention that England also have the worlds best spinner along with the best fast bowling line-up.

  • phoenixsteve on July 19, 2012, 4:46 GMT

    Weather permitting we will soon find out who's the better side. Even on neutral territory I'd fancy England who seem to have a more rounded team. The saffers are an aging lot and don't forget their reputation for that 'C' word. Ultimately I expect the class of England to shine and the return series in S.A. will be more even? England have the weapons and this series being played in English conditions is about bowling attack! I expect 2-0 to England with oine game drawn thanks to the weather..... but it could be a drawn series also thanks to weather? Who knows? I can't wait to find out and I'm off to bed at 10pm in order to watch the test at 3am here in Phoenix, AZ. Go away rain..... COME ON ENGLAND!!!

  • on July 19, 2012, 4:28 GMT

    Rohan, this England team belted Australia last year 4-1, so thats not bad away form. I think you should say instead that England struggle on the dead Asian pitches which blunts their bowling attack and shows that their batsmen are susceptible to class spinners.

    As for this series, its South Africa Firsts versus South Africa Seconds in the batting and South Africa versus England in the bowling. So whoever wins, we can say South Africa are the best batting team in the world.

  • on July 19, 2012, 4:19 GMT

    @Rohan Mark Jay said : South African team perform well in all conditions against any type of bowling attack. Wether in the Subcontinent or England. This is NOT true...South Africa in Sri Lanka, From: 1993-2006, Matches played :10, Won : 2, Lost: 4, Tied: 0, Drawn: 4 The two wins they registered was also in early 1990's...and there best player Jack Kallis has never scored a Test century in Sri Lanka.

  • RohanMarkJay on July 19, 2012, 0:56 GMT

    Some summers in England can be horrible. Such a summer has arrived in 2012 so far. Summer of 2012 has been a overcast wet one in the UK. If the weather continues to be wet, you would think it would favor England's bowlers. Even though South Africa got equally good bowlers. There is not much between the two sides except England got home ground advantage.I wouldn't be surprised if England lost the 2012 clash against South Africa and lost their number one ranking with it. This South African team is good enough to be number one ranked test team too.In fact they are a better team than England, because unlike England team.South African team perform well in all conditions against any type of bowling attack. Wether in the Subcontinent or England. This particular England side may be ranked number one.But they struggle outside of England. Thats not to take anything away from them. They still had to play good cricket to be number one. Just saying they are very good at home, but struggle away.

  • maddy20 on July 18, 2012, 23:46 GMT

    Steyn,Philander, Morkel vs Anderson, Broad, Bresnan. No prizes for guessing which trio are the faster, more attacking and more likely to come out on top.

  • Juiceoftheapple on July 18, 2012, 23:09 GMT

    Englands success is built on defence, batting to 7, 8 and 9. Dont lose first and try and win second. Thankfully Swann enables this policy to work with only 4 bowlers. Would love to see Finn bowling, but Bresnans grit, old ball swing and batting average of 40 is awesome.

  • on July 18, 2012, 21:59 GMT

    batting isn't the only way how kallis knows how to make an impact! he can bowl and bowl well And yes amla vs trott is another one to be seen, as is morkel vs finn/bresnan

  • mikey76 on July 18, 2012, 21:45 GMT

    SurlyCynic. Not sure what you mean?? Who cares where a person is born. It's where you were brought up and where you learnt your cricket that matters. Ted Dexter for example was born in Milan, Italy. Does that mean he should never have played for England?? Very strange.

  • JG2704 on July 18, 2012, 20:19 GMT

    @Sam Carr on (July 18 2012, 16:08 PM GMT) I hope Ravi does well and it's nothing against Ravi , but I'd certainly play a 5th bowler

  • KarachiKid on July 18, 2012, 19:32 GMT

    waiting for a mouth watering contest.

  • SurlyCynic on July 18, 2012, 18:05 GMT

    Think we need more detail, like 'players born in Joburg' vs 'players born in Cape Town' for example.

  • Beertjie on July 18, 2012, 17:54 GMT

    I am no England fan, but I've long shared your sentiments, Sam Carr, concerning the relative values of England's no. vs an extra pace bowler. The only reasonable inference is lack of confidence by management in the lower middle order, stats notwithstanding!

  • on July 18, 2012, 17:46 GMT

    I suspect that in the battle of the seam bowling line-ups, SA have the edge: Steyn, Philander, and Morkel collectively seem to me to be slightly stronger than Anderson, Broad, and Bresnan. When you add Tahir, Kallis, and Swan to the mix, I'd say that the balance tilts slightly toward England (Kallis is clearly miles better than Bopara, but probably won't bowl enough overs to make much of a difference).

    Where England have a huge advantage is in their reserve bowlers. Injuries permitting, England could filed a second XI with a bowling attack of Finn, Tremlett, Onions, and Panesar. South Africa on the other hand have Tsotsobe, De Lange, and Peterson.

    I can't help feeling that with these reserves, England would have considerably better prospects over a five test series (where players inevitably pick up injuries) than over the three test series.

  • FreddyForPrimeMinister on July 18, 2012, 16:31 GMT

    Excited. Very, very excited.

  • on July 18, 2012, 16:08 GMT

    How about Bopara vs Finn, a batsman who has yet to prove himself at test match level in at number 6, averaging 35 in a team where Matt Prior bats at 7 with a test average of 42, Tim Bresnan bats at 8 with a test average of 40, Stuart Broad bats at 9 with a test average of 28 and Graeme Swann bats at 10 with a test average of 22. There must be an argument to say that England don't need to pick a specialist batsman at 6 and in fact picking the extra seamer in Finn would enhance the bowling attack with something that it lacks, genuine pace. In this battle of the best bowling attacks I am personally certain that Finn would have more impact with the ball, than Ravi will have with the bat.

  • phoenixsteve on July 18, 2012, 16:06 GMT

    What about Ian Bell vs Amla? Both gys have huge capabilities and England need to get Amla cheaply or face some big totals. Ditto for South Africa and Belly..... COME ON ENGLAND!!!

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  • phoenixsteve on July 18, 2012, 16:06 GMT

    What about Ian Bell vs Amla? Both gys have huge capabilities and England need to get Amla cheaply or face some big totals. Ditto for South Africa and Belly..... COME ON ENGLAND!!!

  • on July 18, 2012, 16:08 GMT

    How about Bopara vs Finn, a batsman who has yet to prove himself at test match level in at number 6, averaging 35 in a team where Matt Prior bats at 7 with a test average of 42, Tim Bresnan bats at 8 with a test average of 40, Stuart Broad bats at 9 with a test average of 28 and Graeme Swann bats at 10 with a test average of 22. There must be an argument to say that England don't need to pick a specialist batsman at 6 and in fact picking the extra seamer in Finn would enhance the bowling attack with something that it lacks, genuine pace. In this battle of the best bowling attacks I am personally certain that Finn would have more impact with the ball, than Ravi will have with the bat.

  • FreddyForPrimeMinister on July 18, 2012, 16:31 GMT

    Excited. Very, very excited.

  • on July 18, 2012, 17:46 GMT

    I suspect that in the battle of the seam bowling line-ups, SA have the edge: Steyn, Philander, and Morkel collectively seem to me to be slightly stronger than Anderson, Broad, and Bresnan. When you add Tahir, Kallis, and Swan to the mix, I'd say that the balance tilts slightly toward England (Kallis is clearly miles better than Bopara, but probably won't bowl enough overs to make much of a difference).

    Where England have a huge advantage is in their reserve bowlers. Injuries permitting, England could filed a second XI with a bowling attack of Finn, Tremlett, Onions, and Panesar. South Africa on the other hand have Tsotsobe, De Lange, and Peterson.

    I can't help feeling that with these reserves, England would have considerably better prospects over a five test series (where players inevitably pick up injuries) than over the three test series.

  • Beertjie on July 18, 2012, 17:54 GMT

    I am no England fan, but I've long shared your sentiments, Sam Carr, concerning the relative values of England's no. vs an extra pace bowler. The only reasonable inference is lack of confidence by management in the lower middle order, stats notwithstanding!

  • SurlyCynic on July 18, 2012, 18:05 GMT

    Think we need more detail, like 'players born in Joburg' vs 'players born in Cape Town' for example.

  • KarachiKid on July 18, 2012, 19:32 GMT

    waiting for a mouth watering contest.

  • JG2704 on July 18, 2012, 20:19 GMT

    @Sam Carr on (July 18 2012, 16:08 PM GMT) I hope Ravi does well and it's nothing against Ravi , but I'd certainly play a 5th bowler

  • mikey76 on July 18, 2012, 21:45 GMT

    SurlyCynic. Not sure what you mean?? Who cares where a person is born. It's where you were brought up and where you learnt your cricket that matters. Ted Dexter for example was born in Milan, Italy. Does that mean he should never have played for England?? Very strange.

  • on July 18, 2012, 21:59 GMT

    batting isn't the only way how kallis knows how to make an impact! he can bowl and bowl well And yes amla vs trott is another one to be seen, as is morkel vs finn/bresnan