West Indies in England 2012 May 23, 2012

Cook backs use of floodlights in Test cricket

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Alastair Cook, the batsman at the centre of England's successful run chase against West Indies at Lord's, has expressed support for the authorities' growing willingness to use floodlights in Test cricket.

The ECB has traditionally been ultra-cautious in advocating the use of floodlights outside the one-day game but that suspicion has been markedly reduced this summer with England and West Indies both committed to using artificial light throughout the three-Test series whenever the occasion demands. The ruling came from the ICC's match referee, Roshan Mahanama, during a pre-series briefing and neither board took up their right to appeal against floodlights being used at any of the three grounds hosting a Test in the series - Lord's, Trent Bridge or Edgbaston.

There has been no change in the ICC regulations governing use of floodlights, but there has been a shift in interpretation. Mahanama stressed that players would only leave the field if conditions were regarded as unsafe and expressed a stronger commitment to the regulation which states: "If in the opinion of the umpires, natural light is deteriorating to an unfit level, they shall authorize the ground authorities to use the available artificial lighting so that the match can continue in acceptable conditions."

Cook, whose opinion as England's Test vice-captain and captain in 50-over cricket is significant, has no complaints and he indicated that the rest of the side were comfortable about a shift in policy that puts the entertainment of the public first. He experienced first-hand the difficulties of batting under lights when England collapsed to 10 for 2 in four hostile overs at the end of the fourth day but he survived to make 79 in England's five-wicket win.

"I think that fourth day was a prime example of why lights should be used in Test cricket," he said. "There are occasions when it works to your disadvantage like when it's pretty dark, such as the last 15 to 20 minutes on that day when we had to go and face it.

"But we were talking about it in the dressing-room and if those lights weren't on we probably wouldn't have played much that day and I think for the crowd and the entertainment we've got to try and get as much play as we can. It will work in your favour one day and others you'll have to go and face four overs in not ideal conditions but hopefully we'll benefit from that situation at some stage as well."

The MCC has been as a champion of floodlit Tests at night and, in common with the ICC, it has conducted research into pink and orange balls that might be more suited to night Tests. But when it comes to poor light in the day time, the common-or-garden red ball does not seem to have outlived its usefulness.

"It feels quite strange," said Cook, who was one of four England captains gathered in Nottingham in support of the latest scheme to bring cricket to the inner cities. "It's just different because we are exploring new ground but I think it worked really well. Because Test cricket is over five days, if one side are bowling under lights and then the other has to bat in those conditions all the time you might be able to change the game too much but at Lord's because of the nature of the wicket, it was fine. There's a good case for using them now.

"We were saying we don't think we'd have got much play, certainly not the 80 or 90-odd overs we got, and it probably would've been hard to get a result. We wouldn't have got more than 30 or 40 overs. We wouldn't have won that game without those lights.

"We need a bit more experience of playing with them but at lord's when the wicket was good it didn't seem to affect what the ball did."

Without the willingness of England and West Indies to resort to floodlights, the scourge of bad light would have severely disrupted the Lord's Test, frustrating spectators and potentially costing the ECB revenue when many counties are under severe financial pressure. Test cricket has benefited significantly from the investment in faster-draining outfields and it is logical to hope that floodlights, better quality on most English Test grounds these days, can bring similar dividends.

It remains to be seen whether England and South Africa will remain so committed to floodlights later this summer in a series that could decide the No. 1 Test ranking. Nothing in ICC regulations is ever entirely clear: the use of floodlights is subject to the interpretation of clause 16 on playing which allows for additional playing time at the end of regulation hours to recover time lost to the weather.

Cook, though, spoke for many who tire of interminable late finishes because of weather-interrupted days, a common feature of Test cricket in England, when he stated: "Of course common sense always has to be used at certain stages. But in an ideal world eleven 'til six is best."

Denesh Ramdin, West Indies' vice-captain, did not sound quite as enthusiastic. He not only had to bat under floodlights, but keep wicket as well and he took several painful blows on the hands during the Test. "It was a bit difficult with the pavilion in the background," he said. "It was difficult and it was challenging."

Shivnarine Chanderpaul had also expressed surprise at use of floodlights at the end of two prolonged innings in which he batted nearly ten-and-a-half hours in the match. "He didn't seem to have any problems, he batted long enough I think," Cook joked. "Like always in cricket, and any sport, sometimes when you go into the unknown it's different."

David Hopps is the UK editor of ESPNcricinfo

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • zenboomerang on May 26, 2012, 6:54 GMT

    @Riingo :- "my take on this issue is that it is not the start of day/night tests"... In Oz it is an issue & the climate has much to do with it - much easier to play 3 hours under cooler conditions for both players, spectators, TV revenue... That is the reason CA want to play SS matches in day/night scenario's, also likely to get better crowd suport... The problem with Tests (using lights) is when do you stop?... You start at 11a.m. then lose 3 hours to rain say until 6p.m. - do you play until 9-10p.m.?... I don't think anyone would want that...

  • The_bowlers_Holding on May 25, 2012, 7:03 GMT

    I think there is some confusion, my take on this issue is that it is not the start of day/night tests but a measure to ensure a full days play rather than going off for bad light, this can only be agood thing for the spectators who pay good money in England (>£60) In response to Cook being a flash in the pan and only having one good knock against India well his average v crickets real No.1 is 48 and he scored a century on debut in India- however he has not got an IPL contract which is proof he is rubbish.

  • zenboomerang on May 25, 2012, 5:27 GMT

    I know in Oz that CA have been pushing to get Shield games into day/night encounters for a few years now & using the lights in Tests... The stumbling block has been the orange, pink balls that have been tested & proven unsatisfactory to date... A problem that may also cause dilemmas is a ball that is 40 overs old that is scuffed & soiled that becomes unplayable under lights - do the umpires swap the ball, even though the bowling team wants to keep that ball because of reverse swing or suiting the spinners?... Seeing that they now use 2 white balls in one-dayers for just 50 overs, what will they do for Tests & 80 overs? ...

  • Meety on May 25, 2012, 2:44 GMT

    @o-bomb - actually I wasn't really shivering, haven't worn a jumper in SE QLD (day or night) this century!

  • rahulcricket007 on May 25, 2012, 2:17 GMT

    @ G SRI . i wouldn't say things like that about him . cook is really a good batsmen . a typical test batsmen which has all the wisdom of the greats like dravid , kallis , gavskar which is importnat for playing test cricket . also he played some good innings in uae & sl .

  • JG2704 on May 24, 2012, 19:23 GMT

    Just thinking about the starting earlier. I suppose one of the key reasons in having floodlit tests is in the hope of attracting more people to games with later starts etc so the earlier starts would defeat the object. I wonder if they'll consider using floodlights so play can be extended when play has been rain interupted

  • on May 24, 2012, 15:15 GMT

    Lets go on a trail of using day-night tests and see how it works. Here in South Africa it will work for sure

  • Front-Foot-Lunge on May 24, 2012, 14:53 GMT

    With no question as to who is number 1, and just ask any Indian or Australian fan what they think of Cook (there's humble pie if ever we saw it!), Cook has started the year superbly and looks set for yet another run-fest this year

  • A_Yorkshire_Lad on May 24, 2012, 14:00 GMT

    @ G.Sri - I suppose the whole Indian team not managing to outscore Cook's 294 at Edgbaston in 7 innings out of 8 last summer was a flash in the pan as well ? A first class average of 47.52 and a test average of 48.75 - yeah , you're right , he's rubbish isn't he ? Well spotted , mate !

  • YorkshirePudding on May 24, 2012, 13:14 GMT

    @yorkshirematt, same here, just explaining that it might not be the YCCC commitees fault that there are no lights up, but a problem with the council rejecting planning permission after residents objections.....@Yevghenny, what about spinners not being able to get a good purchase on a damp ball? besides they were talking about having Tests go on as late as ODI's, which is about 9-10pm in the UK lights would start up around 5-6, conditions start to change about 7 as the air temp drops and the sun starts to settle, this is a bigger problem in the Sub-continent.

  • zenboomerang on May 26, 2012, 6:54 GMT

    @Riingo :- "my take on this issue is that it is not the start of day/night tests"... In Oz it is an issue & the climate has much to do with it - much easier to play 3 hours under cooler conditions for both players, spectators, TV revenue... That is the reason CA want to play SS matches in day/night scenario's, also likely to get better crowd suport... The problem with Tests (using lights) is when do you stop?... You start at 11a.m. then lose 3 hours to rain say until 6p.m. - do you play until 9-10p.m.?... I don't think anyone would want that...

  • The_bowlers_Holding on May 25, 2012, 7:03 GMT

    I think there is some confusion, my take on this issue is that it is not the start of day/night tests but a measure to ensure a full days play rather than going off for bad light, this can only be agood thing for the spectators who pay good money in England (>£60) In response to Cook being a flash in the pan and only having one good knock against India well his average v crickets real No.1 is 48 and he scored a century on debut in India- however he has not got an IPL contract which is proof he is rubbish.

  • zenboomerang on May 25, 2012, 5:27 GMT

    I know in Oz that CA have been pushing to get Shield games into day/night encounters for a few years now & using the lights in Tests... The stumbling block has been the orange, pink balls that have been tested & proven unsatisfactory to date... A problem that may also cause dilemmas is a ball that is 40 overs old that is scuffed & soiled that becomes unplayable under lights - do the umpires swap the ball, even though the bowling team wants to keep that ball because of reverse swing or suiting the spinners?... Seeing that they now use 2 white balls in one-dayers for just 50 overs, what will they do for Tests & 80 overs? ...

  • Meety on May 25, 2012, 2:44 GMT

    @o-bomb - actually I wasn't really shivering, haven't worn a jumper in SE QLD (day or night) this century!

  • rahulcricket007 on May 25, 2012, 2:17 GMT

    @ G SRI . i wouldn't say things like that about him . cook is really a good batsmen . a typical test batsmen which has all the wisdom of the greats like dravid , kallis , gavskar which is importnat for playing test cricket . also he played some good innings in uae & sl .

  • JG2704 on May 24, 2012, 19:23 GMT

    Just thinking about the starting earlier. I suppose one of the key reasons in having floodlit tests is in the hope of attracting more people to games with later starts etc so the earlier starts would defeat the object. I wonder if they'll consider using floodlights so play can be extended when play has been rain interupted

  • on May 24, 2012, 15:15 GMT

    Lets go on a trail of using day-night tests and see how it works. Here in South Africa it will work for sure

  • Front-Foot-Lunge on May 24, 2012, 14:53 GMT

    With no question as to who is number 1, and just ask any Indian or Australian fan what they think of Cook (there's humble pie if ever we saw it!), Cook has started the year superbly and looks set for yet another run-fest this year

  • A_Yorkshire_Lad on May 24, 2012, 14:00 GMT

    @ G.Sri - I suppose the whole Indian team not managing to outscore Cook's 294 at Edgbaston in 7 innings out of 8 last summer was a flash in the pan as well ? A first class average of 47.52 and a test average of 48.75 - yeah , you're right , he's rubbish isn't he ? Well spotted , mate !

  • YorkshirePudding on May 24, 2012, 13:14 GMT

    @yorkshirematt, same here, just explaining that it might not be the YCCC commitees fault that there are no lights up, but a problem with the council rejecting planning permission after residents objections.....@Yevghenny, what about spinners not being able to get a good purchase on a damp ball? besides they were talking about having Tests go on as late as ODI's, which is about 9-10pm in the UK lights would start up around 5-6, conditions start to change about 7 as the air temp drops and the sun starts to settle, this is a bigger problem in the Sub-continent.

  • John-Price on May 24, 2012, 13:10 GMT

    Why is Ramdin moaning? It's the best I've seen him play. He ought to bat under lights more often.

  • jmcilhinney on May 24, 2012, 11:47 GMT

    @Yevghenny on (May 24 2012, 09:01 AM GMT), floodlights don't make the ball swing. Swing is affected by factors like temperature, air pressure and humidity. If someone says that the ball swings more under lights what they really mean is that the ball swings more at night, and it just so happens that the lights are on at night. Also, it's worth noting that, if I'm not mistaken, the rule is that the lights cannot be turned off once they are turned on. If it's dark in the morning due to cloud cover and they turn the lights on, they're staying on all day.

  • MrBrightside92 on May 24, 2012, 11:42 GMT

    No brainer really....can't we all go back to arguing about DRS? I haven't seen an article on it as it seemed to work quite well in the first test...JA's gloved dismissal as an example...as for scouring the provinces of SA...England is the Mecca of cricket (rubbish weather or no)...it is a shining beacon to those who want to play...if you have the talent and workrate (not fat or lazy) you will get a fair chance of selection and success (apart from on spinning Asian pitches)....ironic is there are SA's who want to play test cricket for England yet there are West Indians who want to play for RCB..I do like the IPL...just don't like how all the players change quickly..as an outside, can't get into liking one particular team...anyway, hope Mark Nicholas is ok...

  • bumsonseats on May 24, 2012, 11:28 GMT

    G sri the guys 27 years old with 19 100s to his name, how the hell can you say last year was a flash in the pan. say the last 6 years was a flash in the pan since he made his debut using that thinking . the guy will end up with close to 40 100s if he plays another 8 to 10 years using other players of similar class test span. do the math. please give us more of these flash in the pan players

  • Srini_Indian on May 24, 2012, 10:59 GMT

    Cook's last year was just a flash in a pan. Can't wait to see him and his United XI side to get whitewashed against SA and in India.

  • A_Yorkshire_Lad on May 24, 2012, 10:55 GMT

    @ Deezo , This isn't really the time or the place to go into the whole matter of SA-related players in the England squad but one thing we can say is that those players WANT to play for England - they are not sought out , poached or sourced by talent scouts. But , hey , why let the truth get in the way of things ?

  • johnathonjosephs on May 24, 2012, 10:46 GMT

    Why not? Surely some light is better than none at all? Would remove a lot of draws in cricket

  • ste13 on May 24, 2012, 10:04 GMT

    I think this is another small step to introduce day/night test cricket. It can only do good for the game and bring more people to follow. There is no way back.

  • Selassie-I on May 24, 2012, 9:49 GMT

    well said cookie... we should be trying to get as much play in, it has always been frustrating when the players trundle off the field at 4pm and eveyone sits around the ground wondering if they're coming back. All good for pushing for a full days play as much as possible. @rahulcricket007 - he 'only' had one significant innings of 294... isn't that more runs in one innings that most of the indian test batsmen scored all year? yeah.. i'd probably drop him for that?!

  • yorkshirematt on May 24, 2012, 9:48 GMT

    @yorkshirepudding- Some good points made an I agree. I myself am not concerned if headingley had lights or not. I'm not a fan of day nighters and floodlit T20s that begin at 7 anyway (gets too cold for a start!) But they may be useful during championship or test matches rather than getting no play at all but this would not be reason enough to install them. I would just like to see yorkshire compete with other better test grounds as i believe there are already many better grounds than Headingley that host test matches, Edgbaston with its new pavilion (much better than ours), Trent Bridge, Old Trafford when it is finished and the two London grounds.

  • on May 24, 2012, 9:41 GMT

    With all the energy crisis around the world, why would we want to waste electricity by shifting test match cricket to night... when it can be perfectly played in the day time.

  • Deez0 on May 24, 2012, 9:31 GMT

    Good to see England have got a scheme to get cricket to the inner cities...maybe they can unearth some ENGLISH cricketers for a change, instead of scouring the provinces of South Africa for their players!

  • Yevghenny on May 24, 2012, 9:01 GMT

    I think it shouldn't matter if lights make the ball swing more. Batsmen just have to deal with it, they are test batsmen after all - they are supposed to be the best in the world. They don't go off because of cloud cover making the ball hoop, or when a strong wind is making it difficult for bowling. It will only be 20-30 minutes a day, not like it's an entire session, and the public pay a lot of money to see some cricket

  • ed.dixon on May 24, 2012, 8:28 GMT

    I was at Lords last Sunday and the floodlights were on all day. At 11.05 in the morning you could quite clearly see four shadows round every player from the floodlights. Had the lights not been there, I'm pretty sure the day would have been seriously curtailed. I don't think we should be changing to day/night matches as the conditions are too variable, but what's the harm is having a little extra light during the day when it's needed so at least the game can go ahead?

  • o-bomb on May 24, 2012, 8:21 GMT

    I think the bigger problem in England is gloom. When the light is good is lasts well into the evening (yesterday I played a game that went on past 8.30pm). When there are no clouds there is no problem with playing on because the sun stays in the sky for ages, but when the clouds are around (as you saw in the 1st test) it gets very dark. Having the lights on is a no-brainer if it helps the play continue. @Meety - you're shivering at the shocking low of 17 degrees? Wow! You probably saw how many layers the people in the stands at Lords were wearing on sunday. It was below 10 degrees... and that's our summer! I envy your weather sometimes!

  • YorkshirePudding on May 24, 2012, 7:54 GMT

    @yorkshirematt, Yorks may not have Fixed Lights but they do bring in temporary lights, also IIRC they need to secure planning permision to have them, which the local residents may have objected to. I think the Rugby ground gets away with it because they are lower profile than those needed for the cricket ground....People also have to remember that most grounds can only use the Lights for so many days per year, I think for Lords its 15 nights/year, so with 2 day/night tests, that means they can only be used for a max of 5 other days in the year, so MCCC may lose out on T20 and OD revenue.

  • YorkshirePudding on May 24, 2012, 7:39 GMT

    As a frequent spectator at grounds anything that allows the players to stay on the pitch and play cricket is a good thing. I'm not so convinced by the Day-Night tests as we have seen with ODI's the match conditions can change especially in warmer climates where as the air cools moisture starts to form on the grass thus making the ball more open to traditional swing movement, also can get the ball damp making it difficult for spinners to get a good purchase and give it a good rip as well as stiffle reverse swing....@Meety, I feel for you, we went from 10-12 Degrees last thursday to 26 degrees on Wednesday.

  • WhoCaresAboutIPL on May 24, 2012, 7:30 GMT

    I, and a group of friends were at Lords last Friday. Outside the ground, before play, I commented that it was getting really dark. It then improved a bit, but floodlights were used after lunch and for the rest of the day. Play finally finished about 15 minutes early (bad light) but without the extra illumination we would probably have seen only a maximum of 2 hours play... If the batsmen can cope - and it seemed they had no real problems - then I am all for it. Fielding may be a bit more problematic, but since the lights were used on most days, then it probably averaged out.

  • Zippydidodah on May 24, 2012, 7:25 GMT

    60 over one day matches used to start at 10.15. Early starts would be bad in the UK as there is often a lot of mist and dew early in the day. You might find the first innings finished by lunchtime on the first day.

  • venkatesh018 on May 24, 2012, 5:25 GMT

    I am all for Test cricket.Period. Using artificial lights in case of bad light OR bringing on day-night Test cricket is both great for the game.

  • landl47 on May 24, 2012, 5:11 GMT

    @jmcilhinney: you raise an interesting point. I've played quite a bit of evening cricket and I always found that it had to be quite dark before I had trouble seeing the ball when I was batting (sure, the bowlers weren't of test pace, but then we weren't playing on test pitches and I wasn't a test batsman). Fielding, on the other hand, was very difficult because it's much harder to see the ball from an angle than from straight on. I'd rather bat than field in poor light any time.

  • rahulcricket007 on May 24, 2012, 2:53 GMT

    @front foot longue . what are you talking ? he only played one good innings against india in 4 tests . that was 294 at edgabuston . in the remaining three matches he was out cheaply . especailly in first 2 tests he was scoring in single digits .

  • on May 24, 2012, 2:50 GMT

    Agree that starting earlier would avoid some of the need for floodlights at the end of the day, but would then introduce other problems such as dampness in the air / on the pitch. Problem isn't just with lighting at the end of the day, as per Lord's test, the light was poor for most of the day so anything that keeps the game moving and lets the fans see 90 overs in a day has got to be good for the game. Reducing the slow over rates is another great innovation, although I feel sorry for the players who have lost 40% of their match fee

  • subbass on May 24, 2012, 2:28 GMT

    " I would like to see more use of morning daylight in Tests. If a session is lost for rain/poor light, I think they should consider starting at 9am instead of 11. In other words set the standard hours of play as being xx to xx, but allow scope for 2 hours either side to make up for lost play. If say 1st day washed out, make time up over 4days "

    ---

    I agree with this, has always amazed me that it was not done/a rule. Surely well paid cricketers can handle getting to the ground a few hours earlier ? As for spectators, well you can easy miss the first hour, or even two hours of a days play, if you really can't get yourself to the ground on time. Sure 7 or 8am starts would be pushing it, but 9am is fine here and there, it's not like it would be common or anything. Test cricket must be protected to the maximum.

    It basically is the game whatever any of the limited overs bunch say. And I do like ODI's/T-20's also just not anywhere near as much. But this is an argument for another day !

  • Deuce03 on May 24, 2012, 1:54 GMT

    As something of a traditionalist, I would rather not see lights used if at all possible, but if there can be no play otherwise then it would be ridiculous not to use them, especially in England where rain stopping play is enough of a problem, let alone gloom. Players' opinion seems divided but then when was it ever not? The conditions will always give some sort of advantage to somebody; the trick is to make the best use of the conditions possible. The lights get a (cautious, but definite) thumbs up from me.

  • on May 24, 2012, 1:47 GMT

    So long as they don't use pink balls I'm cool.

  • jmcilhinney on May 24, 2012, 0:58 GMT

    Playing in poor daylight and playing at night are definitely two different things. The white ball is required to stand out against a black night sky and also coloured pads. The red ball is probably fine for white pads and a grey sky, although I've never actually played in those conditions so I can't say for sure. It was interesting getting Ramdin's perspective. I guess we all think about what it might be like for batting but not much about the keeper.

  • Sinhaya on May 24, 2012, 0:29 GMT

    I am eagerly awaiting to see day night test cricket

  • Meety on May 23, 2012, 23:37 GMT

    @5wombats - "...People from other cricket playing countries don't generally realise just how awful the weather is here in the UK." - mate we do. I don't think I ever saw an episode of Eastenders or The Bill where it was sunny!!!! I am currently "shivering" here in SE QLD, because the temp got down to a shocking minimum of 17 degrees! (actually I haven't worn a jumper in winter in Brisbane - ever!). Its almost winter & the kids were swimming in the pool last week end!

  • Meety on May 23, 2012, 23:31 GMT

    @IndnCrktfan-BCCI won't do it as it will affect Tendulkar! (part joking, part serious)! @JG2704 - I have forgotten the outcome, but in Oz, pretty sure they have been playing twilight Shield matches the past season. I can't remember for certain what colour the ball was. I would imagine that there would be no need to change from the red ball if a game is scheduled to be played thru "normal" hours (11 to 6pm). If a match was to start at say 1pm, that could be a different matter. == == == The countries that can afford it, should use it. I understand that some countries would be at a disadvantage to some extent if they don't have the domestic facilities. I would like to see more use of morning daylight in Tests. If a session is lost for rain/poor light, I think they should consider starting at 9am instead of 11. In other words set the standard hours of play as being xx to xx, but allow scope for 2 hours either side to make up for lost play. If say 1st day washed out, make time up over 4days

  • PunchDrunkPunter on May 23, 2012, 23:06 GMT

    England innovating the game of cricket again. Switch hits, flood light Tests, slower ball bouncers, T20 format, doosra and loads more.

  • JG2704 on May 23, 2012, 20:50 GMT

    lots of food for thought here. Would this also mean that all test grounds would have to have a decent Floodlight sytsem in place? Assuming so , does this end the bad light scenario? Does anyone know if the pink ball is still being used? Also I wonder if a match would start off with a red ball and then go on to a white ball at lunch or something and if so I guess they'd have to get a ball which was 25-30 overs old...

  • 5wombats on May 23, 2012, 20:35 GMT

    There is no question that the light and playing conditions at Lords were hideous; Grey/Dark/Gloom + it was FREEZING... Whole days would have been lost and no result therefore possible had it not been for the lights. People from other cricket playing countries don't generally realise just how awful the weather is here in the UK. Quite how we ever managed to invent a game like cricket will probably never be fully understood! 5 votes for Lights!

  • landl47 on May 23, 2012, 19:41 GMT

    It's about time more focus was given to the reason for playing professional test cricket- to entertain the public. Tickets are not cheap these days and spectators should be given every chance to see a decent day's play. Nothing can be done about rain, but lighting is a problem that can be managed. Shorter format games have been played for many years now under lights, so the players are all fully familiar with it. If the dark ball is an issue, then by all means use a lighter color. Everything possible should be done to ensure that spectators get their money's worth, otherwise, guess what? There will be no spectators. Good for Cook for taking such a positive stance. I hope his example will be followed by others.

  • NAZMO-CRICKFANN on May 23, 2012, 18:39 GMT

    DAH . IF IF LIGHT AT THE END OF THE DAY IS A PROBLEM THEN START THE GAME AN HOUR EARLIER... WOW DOES IT NEED A SCIENTIST TO FIGURE THAT OUT

  • Front-Foot-Lunge on May 23, 2012, 18:03 GMT

    Cook....the name that sends a shiver down the spines of any Australian, Indian fans. His opinion is certainly significant.

  • yorkshirematt on May 23, 2012, 17:31 GMT

    It would be silly not to use floodlights in this country. Even in county cricket, especially as most county grounds have them these days, except headingley, so whether they agree to use them in the SA series or not it will be irrelevant for that match. Yorkshire-always moving with the times, not

  • StatisticsRocks on May 23, 2012, 17:12 GMT

    its a great Idea. I would love to see test matches played under flood lights.

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  • StatisticsRocks on May 23, 2012, 17:12 GMT

    its a great Idea. I would love to see test matches played under flood lights.

  • yorkshirematt on May 23, 2012, 17:31 GMT

    It would be silly not to use floodlights in this country. Even in county cricket, especially as most county grounds have them these days, except headingley, so whether they agree to use them in the SA series or not it will be irrelevant for that match. Yorkshire-always moving with the times, not

  • Front-Foot-Lunge on May 23, 2012, 18:03 GMT

    Cook....the name that sends a shiver down the spines of any Australian, Indian fans. His opinion is certainly significant.

  • NAZMO-CRICKFANN on May 23, 2012, 18:39 GMT

    DAH . IF IF LIGHT AT THE END OF THE DAY IS A PROBLEM THEN START THE GAME AN HOUR EARLIER... WOW DOES IT NEED A SCIENTIST TO FIGURE THAT OUT

  • landl47 on May 23, 2012, 19:41 GMT

    It's about time more focus was given to the reason for playing professional test cricket- to entertain the public. Tickets are not cheap these days and spectators should be given every chance to see a decent day's play. Nothing can be done about rain, but lighting is a problem that can be managed. Shorter format games have been played for many years now under lights, so the players are all fully familiar with it. If the dark ball is an issue, then by all means use a lighter color. Everything possible should be done to ensure that spectators get their money's worth, otherwise, guess what? There will be no spectators. Good for Cook for taking such a positive stance. I hope his example will be followed by others.

  • 5wombats on May 23, 2012, 20:35 GMT

    There is no question that the light and playing conditions at Lords were hideous; Grey/Dark/Gloom + it was FREEZING... Whole days would have been lost and no result therefore possible had it not been for the lights. People from other cricket playing countries don't generally realise just how awful the weather is here in the UK. Quite how we ever managed to invent a game like cricket will probably never be fully understood! 5 votes for Lights!

  • JG2704 on May 23, 2012, 20:50 GMT

    lots of food for thought here. Would this also mean that all test grounds would have to have a decent Floodlight sytsem in place? Assuming so , does this end the bad light scenario? Does anyone know if the pink ball is still being used? Also I wonder if a match would start off with a red ball and then go on to a white ball at lunch or something and if so I guess they'd have to get a ball which was 25-30 overs old...

  • PunchDrunkPunter on May 23, 2012, 23:06 GMT

    England innovating the game of cricket again. Switch hits, flood light Tests, slower ball bouncers, T20 format, doosra and loads more.

  • Meety on May 23, 2012, 23:31 GMT

    @IndnCrktfan-BCCI won't do it as it will affect Tendulkar! (part joking, part serious)! @JG2704 - I have forgotten the outcome, but in Oz, pretty sure they have been playing twilight Shield matches the past season. I can't remember for certain what colour the ball was. I would imagine that there would be no need to change from the red ball if a game is scheduled to be played thru "normal" hours (11 to 6pm). If a match was to start at say 1pm, that could be a different matter. == == == The countries that can afford it, should use it. I understand that some countries would be at a disadvantage to some extent if they don't have the domestic facilities. I would like to see more use of morning daylight in Tests. If a session is lost for rain/poor light, I think they should consider starting at 9am instead of 11. In other words set the standard hours of play as being xx to xx, but allow scope for 2 hours either side to make up for lost play. If say 1st day washed out, make time up over 4days

  • Meety on May 23, 2012, 23:37 GMT

    @5wombats - "...People from other cricket playing countries don't generally realise just how awful the weather is here in the UK." - mate we do. I don't think I ever saw an episode of Eastenders or The Bill where it was sunny!!!! I am currently "shivering" here in SE QLD, because the temp got down to a shocking minimum of 17 degrees! (actually I haven't worn a jumper in winter in Brisbane - ever!). Its almost winter & the kids were swimming in the pool last week end!