February 10, 2012

Which teams are the worst travellers?

A look at how Australia, South Africa and England have fared in Asia, and vice versa
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The last seven months have been terrible ones for touring teams in Test cricket. India have lost eight Tests in a row - four each in England and Australia - while Sri Lanka have lost two out of three; England, meanwhile, lost all three in the UAE to Pakistan. The only team to escape the drubbing was Australia: they won their three-Test series against Sri Lanka 1-0.

Traditionally, tours to Australia, South Africa and England have been the toughest ones for teams from the subcontinent; conversely, tours to Asia have been the most difficult ones for the others. Is it true that teams from the subcontinent are worse travellers than the sides from Australia, South Africa and England? Here's a look at the numbers.

For the purpose of this exercise, only three teams each were considered from within and outside the subcontinent. Bangladesh's terrible record in Test cricket disqualifies them immediately, while New Zealand and West Indies have also struggled in Tests over the last few years, no matter where they've travelled. That leaves India, Pakistan and Sri Lanka as the subcontinent teams, and Australia, England and South Africa as the sides from outside the subcontinent. The time period considered for the exercise is since the beginning of 2005 - long enough for teams to have toured each of the other countries at least once, and also the period during which Australia's overwhelming dominance overseas had come to an end. In the five years between 2000 and 2004, for example, Australia had a 9-3 win-loss record in Asia; since then, it has dropped to 1-4 in nine Tests.

The overall numbers since the beginning of 2005 show that the top teams from outside the subcontinent have had as much trouble in Asia as the subcontinental teams have had overseas. Australia, England and South Africa have drawn more Tests, but the win-loss ratio is almost the same: 0.28 for the subcontinent teams, and 0.31 for the overseas team in Asia. Between 2000 and 2004, however, the overseas teams had a much better record in Asia: 15 wins and only ten defeats. Australia had their imposing 9-3 record, and even England (3-3) and South Africa (3-4) did better. On the other hand, the subcontinent teams had a worse record between 2000 and 2004, with a 3-16 win-loss ratio.

Overseas problems
Teams Hosts Tests Won Lost Drawn W/L ratio
Aus, Eng, RSA Ind, Pak, SL, UAE 34 5 16 13 0.31
Ind, Pak, SL Aus, Eng, RSA 49 9 32 8 0.28

The win-loss ratios are almost the same, but in terms of batting and bowling averages the differences are huge: the gap between the two averages is significantly more for the teams from the subcontinent, compared to that for the overseas teams touring Asia. The main difference is in the batting averages: the unfamiliarity with bouncy pitches and seaming conditions is a clear disadvantage for the teams from the subcontinent - they average 27.48 per wicket when they tour Australia, South Africa and England. In contrast, when those teams tour Asia, their batting average is a respectable 34.37. The batting averages also conform to the theory that it's much tougher to adjust to higher bounce than to pitches with lower bounce.

The huge difference in the averages, despite the close win-loss ratio, also suggests that the margins of defeats for the teams from the subcontinent are much greater. In the period under consideration, India, Sri Lanka and Pakistan have lost ten of those 32 Tests by an innings, four by more than 290 runs, and three by nine or more wickets. The victory margins, on the other hand, have been much narrower. India alone have lost by an innings five times during this period. (Click here for the full list of results.)

Australia, South Africa and England haven't been blown away as often when they tour Asia. They've lost thrice by an innings, but have also won a couple of times by that margin (both by South Africa, against India). (Click here for their full list of results.)

Batting and bowling stats when touring
Teams Hosts Batting ave Bowling ave Difference
Aus, Eng, RSA Ind, Pak, SL, UAE 34.37 39.17 -4.80
Ind, Pak, SL Aus, Eng, RSA 27.48 40.79 -13.31

Breaking it up further by teams, the difference between batting and bowling averages is greatest for Sri Lanka, despite them having the best win-loss ratio among the three teams. That's again because of the margins by which they've lost some of their matches. The bowling has been their chief cause for concern: they've conceded nearly 50 runs per wicket. India's difference isn't as high, despite the drubbings in England and Australia, while Pakistan's difference is the smallest, thanks to a bowling attack that is significantly better than those of India and Sri Lanka.

Subcontinent teams overseas*
Team Tests W/L/D W/L ratio Bat ave Bowl ave Diff
Sri Lanka 11 2/6/3 0.33 28.76 49.95 -21.19
India 21 4/13/4 0.30 28.47 41.64 -13.17
Pakistan 17 3/13/1 0.23 25.35 35.83 -10.48
* In Aus, Eng and RSA only

Among overseas teams in Asia, South Africa are the only ones with a positive difference between batting and bowling averages. Their batting numbers clearly reveal that they, more than any other side, have best figured out how to play on slow pitches and in turning conditions. England's batsmen, on the other hand, have struggled, even though their bowlers have done pretty well.

Overseas teams in Asia*
Team Tests W/L/D W/L ratio Bat ave Bowl ave Diff
South Africa
11 3/4/4 0.75 42.61 41.43 1.18
Australia 9 1/4/4 0.25 34.71 40.35 -5.64
England 14 1/8/5 0.12 28.68 36.77 -8.09
* Excluding Bangladesh

And here's a further break-up of the batting numbers by pace and spin. The difference is the largest for India, which justifies the policy of unleashing four fast bowlers against them - spinners average almost 50 runs per wicket against them, while fast bowlers average less than 24. The numbers for Pakistan are slightly unexpected - spinners have done better against them than fast bowlers, even in conditions that should have generally favoured quick bowling. (Click here to see the list of spinners who've been among the wickets against Pakistan.)

The challenge for visiting teams in Asia is spin bowling, but England seem to struggle equally against pace too, averaging just 27.89 against them. South Africa's batsmen average more than 50 against pace, and a respectable 36 against spin.

Teams from the subcontinent versus pace and spin overseas*
Team Pace - Runs Dismissals Average Spin - Runs Dismissals Average
Sri Lanka 4235 163 25.98 1250 37 33.78
India 7789 328 23.74 2536 51 49.72
Pakistan 5477 209 26.20 1941 89 21.80
* In Aus, Eng and RSA only
Overseas teams versus pace and spin in Asia*
Team Pace - Runs Dismissals Average Spin - Runs Dismissals Average
South Africa 2845 54 52.68 3815 106 35.99
Australia 2061 64 32.20 2918 84 34.73
England 3180 114 27.89 3450 129 26.74
* Excluding Bangladesh

Running the rule over the bowlers, it's clear that Sri Lanka need to find quality fast bowlers who'll excel in overseas conditions: their current lot concede almost 64 runs per wicket; it's their spinners who've succeeded in pulling it back a bit. Pakistan's fast bowlers are clearly the best of the lot, averaging 30.24 per wicket.

Among the overseas bowlers in Asia, England's are the best, both in terms of pace and spin. However, their batting has been so inept in Asia that their win-loss ratio is much worse than those of South Africa and Australia.

Bowlers from subcontinent teams overseas*
Team Pace - wkts Average Strike rate Spin - wkts Average Strike rate
Sri Lanka 57 63.82 106.30 52 34.23 69.29
India 205 36.97 65.96 100 45.40 80.15
Pakistan 181 30.24 57.36 75 44.72 85.80
* In Aus, Eng and RSA only
Bowlers from overseas teams in the subcontinent*
Team Pace - wkts Average Strike rate Spin - wkts Average Strike rate
South Africa 107 35.69 63.82 44 47.54 100.16
Australia 96 35.21 74.94 36 50.75 82.53
England 137 33.70 70.82 65 41.67 83.57
* Excluding Bangladesh

And finally, here's a break-up of stats by Asian batsmen in Australia, England and South Africa since the beginning of 2005, overall and against fast bowling. As the table below shows, the numbers don't make impressive reading for most batsmen. Sachin Tendulkar averages almost 49 overall and 41.50 against pace, but the numbers are significantly lower for Rahul Dravid, VVS Laxman and Virender Sehwag. Younis Khan's success in his last two series, in England and South Africa, are reflected in his numbers below. Mohammad Yousuf had one exceptional series in England in 2006, and that helped lift his overall numbers during this period. Mahela Jayawardene's stats tell the story of his troubles outside the subcontinent, but Kumar Sangakkara has done much better.

Subcontinent batsmen in Aus, Eng and RSA since Jan 2005
Batsman Overall - runs Dismissals* Average v pace - runs Dismissals* Average
Sachin Tendulkar 1806 37 48.81 1328 32 41.50
VVS Laxman 1284 36 35.66 943 33 28.57
Rahul Dravid 1263 37 34.13 910 31 29.35
Mohammad Yousuf 1097 21 52.23 797 13 61.30
Kumar Sangakkara 844 20 42.20 647 15 43.13
Salman Butt 796 23 34.60 632 16 39.50
Virender Sehwag 758 28 27.07 617 23 26.82
Imran Farhat 714 29 24.62 647 23 28.13
Sourav Ganguly 698 18 38.77 458 14 32.71
Younis Khan 645 11 58.63 503 8 62.87
Mahela Jayawardene 632 21 30.09 487 21 23.19
Tillakaratne Dilshan 594 14 42.42 465 11 42.27
Thilan Samaraweera 591 15 39.40 435 12 36.25
Gautam Gambhir 525 18 29.16 434 15 28.93
* Only dismissals by bowlers

Among overseas batsmen in Asia, the numbers for the three South Africans - Hashim Amla, Jacques Kallis and AB de Villiers - stand out. How England must wish for at least one batsman who could put up similar numbers in Asia.

Overseas batsmen in Asia since Jan 2005
Batsman Overall-runs Dismissals* Average v spin - runs Dismissals* Average
Hashim Amla 1228 15 81.86 737 8 92.12
Jacques Kallis 1127 13 86.69 720 11 65.45
AB de Villiers 1028 14 73.42 561 10 56.10
Michael Hussey 956 15 63.73 579 10 57.90
Ian Bell 805 26 30.96 391 17 23.00
Kevin Pietersen 759 26 29.19 410 14 29.28
Paul Collingwood 754 16 47.12 409 8 51.12
Alastair Cook 741 19 39.00 404 6 67.33
Andrew Strauss 683 19 35.94 393 10 39.30
Graeme Smith 666 15 44.40 321 10 32.10
Ricky Ponting 614 13 47.23 363 6 60.50
Michael Clarke 500 16 31.25 338 9 37.55
* Only dismissals by bowlers All stats exclude matches in Bangladesh.

S Rajesh is stats editor of ESPNcricinfo. Follow him on Twitter

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • GoldenAsif on February 13, 2012, 16:57 GMT

    That is the whole point about (away) batting averages ... they even out in the end.

    Not saying we should ignore performances in Australia (our nemesis in tests) but then it is also quite remarkable that Younis has been able to maintain such a high average in those countries without doing anything special which proves that he has been consistent atleast over that period

    Some of the greatest batsmen don't even have such good records against every country and/or in every country. It is just not possible. Ponting (career average 53.44) for instance averages 26.48 in India and 38.52 in England. Lara (career average 52.89) averaged 33.00 in India and 36 in NZ

    Even great Viv (career average 50.23) averaged just 19.25 in NZ (77 runs in 3 tests)

    And why take out Yousuf's best performances in England in 2006? It is not like he scored big in one test only. He was consistently good (631 runs at 90.14) over the 4 tests, infact outshone Inzi and many English batsmen in that series.

  • SuperSaj on February 13, 2012, 10:16 GMT

    These statistics really are INCREDIBLY skewed by the last 8 months of cricket. If you look from 2000- Jan 2011..India were the 2nd best test team in terms of overseas test wins and won in every country on multiple occasions (except once in NZ though there were very few tests played). Still far behind the undisputed Champs of this period Australia but alongside SA far ahead of the rest. Pak's and SL;s record does not even come CLOSE in this period. An injured team of fading and ageing idiotic superstars have outstayed their welcome rather than retiring gracefully at the top (i.e after WC 2011 final) and led India to lose this impressive record built over 10 years in 8 months!!!!!!!!. That is the true story of these records. Otherwise, Pak and SL have been consistently mediocre in the last 10 years outside home (and at home as well in some cases) and regards the Western teams..Australia was generally magnificent till 2007..SA competitive and England MISERABLE!!!!!!!

  • on February 13, 2012, 8:52 GMT

    2005 has rightly been set as starting point of stats to show recent performances and they clearly show that Dravid and esp Laxman are very overrated cricketers for the past few years and Laxman is a big liability on Indian team also bcz of his poor fitness..............................................& Kallis is the best test cricketer

  • Meety on February 13, 2012, 0:44 GMT

    It's annoying to see how many wild comments on this site to promote one side over another. To use stats, the author has to draw a line in the sand, he chose 2005. There have been other articles on this site that has shown the decade by decade performances of countries. It was interesting that the top 3 asian sides v top 3 non-asian sides have currently similar away records in a win/loss as[ect, but asian teams tend to fail badly (or worserer) than non-asian teams abroad. I am expecting the next 5 years to be interesting in that I think the IPL will take a lot of the mystery out of playing over there & from an Ozzy viewpoint, I am more confident NOW, then ever before that we can beat India in India. My gut feeling is Kholi & Sharma may have to eat their words very soon!!!!!

  • dms1972 on February 13, 2012, 0:16 GMT

    @Avidcricketlover, Ponting is NOT pathetic against spin, as the stats provided by S Rajesh prove, average against spin of 60.5 for the period analysed is a testament to how good Ponting really is against spin. The only spin bowler Ponting had trouble with on a consistent basis was Harbajhan, and every batsman has his bogey bowler. It's true Harbajhan made Ponting look silly, but that is in no way a true reflection of Ponting's ability against spin.

  • on February 12, 2012, 19:04 GMT

    anindya_mozumdar: It is the only series in India that Australians have won in past 30 years.

  • on February 12, 2012, 18:52 GMT

    It does not make any sense to compare Younis Khan's average of 11 matches with someone who has played 37 matches!

  • on February 12, 2012, 17:07 GMT

    you should tell all tests record instead if last five years

  • dexterous9 on February 12, 2012, 17:07 GMT

    eureka eureka i just calc mohammad yousuf record sa 4 dissmisals 151 runs aus 8 dis 216 runs and eng 11 dissmislas 730 runs total innings 23 and not 21 as it has been shown...total runs are the same 1097 so the avg is 47.6....which is less than tendulkar......the idea of the article is to make non-indian batsmen the best inthe world......just like the writer has done with yousuf.....even the timing of this article is not right just when india lost 8 overseas matches in a row.... tendulkar's ovs would have been in 60s then....i don't und what prob people has got against sach....he is the best of his time to play against the aus....they are the best and the performance should be judged while batting against them.....

  • on February 12, 2012, 12:11 GMT

    finally an article that has revealed some hidden facts...it shows that south africa have been the best touring team in the past 5 years and should have been the best test team right now if their poor home form had not gotten in their way..brilliant numbers 4 kallis,the most underrated cricketer in the world...also interesting to see younis,yosuf have much better averages than the so called run machines from asia....i was absolutely shocked when an average player like sehwag got included in the all time eleven for tests and the jury left kallis...scoring tons of runs on subcontinent doesnt make you agreat batsman...sehwags technique has been exposed on seaming pitches....stats have clearly indicated how poor the so called batting giants of asia have been on seaming pitches......hope southafrica become nmber one soon and kallis starts getting the accolades he deserves

  • GoldenAsif on February 13, 2012, 16:57 GMT

    That is the whole point about (away) batting averages ... they even out in the end.

    Not saying we should ignore performances in Australia (our nemesis in tests) but then it is also quite remarkable that Younis has been able to maintain such a high average in those countries without doing anything special which proves that he has been consistent atleast over that period

    Some of the greatest batsmen don't even have such good records against every country and/or in every country. It is just not possible. Ponting (career average 53.44) for instance averages 26.48 in India and 38.52 in England. Lara (career average 52.89) averaged 33.00 in India and 36 in NZ

    Even great Viv (career average 50.23) averaged just 19.25 in NZ (77 runs in 3 tests)

    And why take out Yousuf's best performances in England in 2006? It is not like he scored big in one test only. He was consistently good (631 runs at 90.14) over the 4 tests, infact outshone Inzi and many English batsmen in that series.

  • SuperSaj on February 13, 2012, 10:16 GMT

    These statistics really are INCREDIBLY skewed by the last 8 months of cricket. If you look from 2000- Jan 2011..India were the 2nd best test team in terms of overseas test wins and won in every country on multiple occasions (except once in NZ though there were very few tests played). Still far behind the undisputed Champs of this period Australia but alongside SA far ahead of the rest. Pak's and SL;s record does not even come CLOSE in this period. An injured team of fading and ageing idiotic superstars have outstayed their welcome rather than retiring gracefully at the top (i.e after WC 2011 final) and led India to lose this impressive record built over 10 years in 8 months!!!!!!!!. That is the true story of these records. Otherwise, Pak and SL have been consistently mediocre in the last 10 years outside home (and at home as well in some cases) and regards the Western teams..Australia was generally magnificent till 2007..SA competitive and England MISERABLE!!!!!!!

  • on February 13, 2012, 8:52 GMT

    2005 has rightly been set as starting point of stats to show recent performances and they clearly show that Dravid and esp Laxman are very overrated cricketers for the past few years and Laxman is a big liability on Indian team also bcz of his poor fitness..............................................& Kallis is the best test cricketer

  • Meety on February 13, 2012, 0:44 GMT

    It's annoying to see how many wild comments on this site to promote one side over another. To use stats, the author has to draw a line in the sand, he chose 2005. There have been other articles on this site that has shown the decade by decade performances of countries. It was interesting that the top 3 asian sides v top 3 non-asian sides have currently similar away records in a win/loss as[ect, but asian teams tend to fail badly (or worserer) than non-asian teams abroad. I am expecting the next 5 years to be interesting in that I think the IPL will take a lot of the mystery out of playing over there & from an Ozzy viewpoint, I am more confident NOW, then ever before that we can beat India in India. My gut feeling is Kholi & Sharma may have to eat their words very soon!!!!!

  • dms1972 on February 13, 2012, 0:16 GMT

    @Avidcricketlover, Ponting is NOT pathetic against spin, as the stats provided by S Rajesh prove, average against spin of 60.5 for the period analysed is a testament to how good Ponting really is against spin. The only spin bowler Ponting had trouble with on a consistent basis was Harbajhan, and every batsman has his bogey bowler. It's true Harbajhan made Ponting look silly, but that is in no way a true reflection of Ponting's ability against spin.

  • on February 12, 2012, 19:04 GMT

    anindya_mozumdar: It is the only series in India that Australians have won in past 30 years.

  • on February 12, 2012, 18:52 GMT

    It does not make any sense to compare Younis Khan's average of 11 matches with someone who has played 37 matches!

  • on February 12, 2012, 17:07 GMT

    you should tell all tests record instead if last five years

  • dexterous9 on February 12, 2012, 17:07 GMT

    eureka eureka i just calc mohammad yousuf record sa 4 dissmisals 151 runs aus 8 dis 216 runs and eng 11 dissmislas 730 runs total innings 23 and not 21 as it has been shown...total runs are the same 1097 so the avg is 47.6....which is less than tendulkar......the idea of the article is to make non-indian batsmen the best inthe world......just like the writer has done with yousuf.....even the timing of this article is not right just when india lost 8 overseas matches in a row.... tendulkar's ovs would have been in 60s then....i don't und what prob people has got against sach....he is the best of his time to play against the aus....they are the best and the performance should be judged while batting against them.....

  • on February 12, 2012, 12:11 GMT

    finally an article that has revealed some hidden facts...it shows that south africa have been the best touring team in the past 5 years and should have been the best test team right now if their poor home form had not gotten in their way..brilliant numbers 4 kallis,the most underrated cricketer in the world...also interesting to see younis,yosuf have much better averages than the so called run machines from asia....i was absolutely shocked when an average player like sehwag got included in the all time eleven for tests and the jury left kallis...scoring tons of runs on subcontinent doesnt make you agreat batsman...sehwags technique has been exposed on seaming pitches....stats have clearly indicated how poor the so called batting giants of asia have been on seaming pitches......hope southafrica become nmber one soon and kallis starts getting the accolades he deserves

  • KiwiRocker- on February 12, 2012, 7:50 GMT

    Agreed with Hasan Cheema and Spele re: Yousaf and Younis. Actually, Pakistan has always done well in England, South Africa and Australia has been the only place they struggle. If you look at Pakistan's last tour to England, they won a test match against England and also won against Australia. The so called top ranked team India was white washed! Another key difference is that Younis Khan ( and Yousaf) scored runs and won matches unlike Tendulya who has a miserable average of mid 30's in 4th innings of a test match. I do not recall any test match where India won because Tendulya and Sehwag scored in 4th innings..There is no point in scoring worthless 17K runs if they do not win matches! Rahul Dravid on other hands does win matches and so is the case for VVS Laxman..Sadly, its time for both of those to leave too! ICC should take some notice and abolish this non sensical ranking system where top ranked teams are being taken to cleaners by lower ranked teams...!

  • sscricfan on February 12, 2012, 2:56 GMT

    Rajesh:

    arent you ignoring the fact that matches in subcontinent to be higher-scoring than in AUS-SA-ENG? I think that contributes to the difference. Perhaps you should compare the performances to average performances

  • on February 12, 2012, 1:01 GMT

    This is the most revealing article in a long time. Kudos to the writer. In recent times, all sides have been lions at home and comparative lambs abroad. The highlights are the excess hype of the Indian batsmen when YK and MY have been BY FAR the best Asian batsmen overseas.

    Taking a historic view, it is true that Pakistan has the best w/l ratio at home and the best overseas w/l ratio amongst Asian sides. This has been due to good bowling. In the decades I've watched, Imran, Wasim, Waqar, Akhtar et al have allowed us regular wins overseas. Still, this situation of home condition heroes has to change for the good of test cricket.

  • Bollo on February 11, 2012, 15:32 GMT

    @rahulcricket007. You`re entitled to your own opinions, but fortunately not your own facts. In the past decade, Australia has achieved series wins against all subcontinental teams in Asia. No Asian team has won even one series in Australia or South Africa - ever- that`s right, not one.

  • peterhrt on February 11, 2012, 13:48 GMT

    New Zealand is not as easy a cricketing country to visit as is sometimes supposed. Here is a team drawn from the many stars who have underperfomed there. Averages in New Zealand in brackets. Herbert Sutcliffe (12), Sehwag (20), Zaheer (19), Viv Richards (19), Gower (17), Sobers (15, bowling 38), Kapil Dev (10, bowling 42), Boucher (8), Abdul Qadir (bowling 52), Roberts (bowling 65), Holding (bowling 47). 12th man Lloyd (15). Others include Boycott (22), Hayden (28), Graeme Pollock (26) and Kumble (bowling 40).

  • Spelele on February 11, 2012, 12:52 GMT

    Why are there people undermining Younis and Yousuf's outstanding stats on the basis that "take away the runs they scored in their prime, and their records look different"?? Why on earth should we ignore their stats on the basis that they were in form when their runs were scored? Isn't it the point that batsmen score runs when they are in form; and don't do so when they are not. For example, Tendulkar's stats in SA are inflated by his last series where he was in the form of his life. Take that series away, and his average is in the 30s. Taking away performances while in form proves nothing other than the fact that batsmen are mediocre when they are not in form. This applies to everyone and is nothing suprising. The fact is that from 2005, Yousuf and Younis were better batsmen outside Asia than Tendulkar and Co. Full stop! The author has given valid reasons for choosing the period that he has. If you are not satisfied, go dig up your own stats and comment on them; not here!

  • peterhrt on February 11, 2012, 12:45 GMT

    Who are the leading all-time non-Asian performers in India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and UAE? Of batsmen with 1000 runs there, six average over 60. Three are the South Africans highlighted above - Kallis, Amla and de Villiers. The others are left-handers Sobers, Lloyd and Stephen Fleming. Sobers' average of 75 is highest. Ken Barrington scored 903 runs at an average of 90. Twelve non-Asian bowlers have captured 50 wickets in these countries. Six fast and six slow. Warne is the leading wicket-taker with 116 at 26. Colleague McGrath has 62 at 26, but both are eclipsed by Richie Benaud whose 71 wickets cost 19 apiece in only 12 matches. England's two representatives are left-arm spinners Underwood and the much maligned Ashley Giles. New Zealand contributes Hadlee and Vettori, and South Africa Shaun Pollock. West Indian bowlers have done best. Walsh's 77 wickets cost 20, as did Hall's 54. Marshall and Gibbs average under 25, and Roberts is only a wicket away from qualifying.

  • big_al_81 on February 11, 2012, 12:16 GMT

    Let's just take a moment to point out the overlooked England batsman in the tables above. PAUL COLLINGWOOD! Very good stats in Asia- maybe we should get him to talk to a few of the more talented crop we have at the moment before we head to SL and then India. Truly a man who made the most of the talent he had - admirable!

  • RandyOZ on February 11, 2012, 12:12 GMT

    Dont know why you need a whole article on this. Oz is the only team to win everywhere, and are clearly the best.

  • teo. on February 11, 2012, 11:23 GMT

    @nutcutlet. Just to add to your comments, its only really in the last 4-5 years that he has had other very good batsmen in the team. Prior to that, it was always a case of, if kallis fails.. SA loses. Would also like to see individual bowler stats... I'm sure Steyn would rank no.1 in that period.

  • on February 11, 2012, 11:04 GMT

    Younis Khan and Muhammad Yousaf are best Asian batsman's in terms of average in overseas conditions (Aus, Eng, SA) since 2005, comfortably leading Walls and Gods

  • on February 11, 2012, 10:46 GMT

    well..... India doesn't seem that bad when you compare with other teams travelling

  • on February 11, 2012, 10:41 GMT

    Clearly Australia (South Africa and England too) provide far better pitches, outfields, stadia, training facilities, crowds, etc. that all add up to better quality Test matches and a truer reflection of quality individual performances. Does that mean it is harder for these players to adapt to inferior subcontinental locations? Or should more credit be given to subcontinental players who perform in better conditions (Younus Khan, Yousuf, Tendulkar, Sangakkara)?

  • Punterisking on February 11, 2012, 10:14 GMT

    All this article proves is that there are LIES, DAMN LIES and then there are STATISTICS

  • hmmmmm... on February 11, 2012, 9:56 GMT

    Shows you can paint any picture you like with statistics...a starting assumption of picking a year when "australia's dominance ended" is a give away that the search is hoping for a particular conclusion! As others have posted you could look at a ten year period and the numbers would look very different... Regardless of the basis of this article however, it still doesn't hide the fact that India and Sri Lanka have been thrashed on the road in recent times and on the basis of those current results are the worst travellers. Of the three subcontinental teams, Pakistan is effectively playing away all of the time and they have proven to be most adaptable. Of the others, South Africa are far from their past choking selves and by some miracle are not the number one ranked test team...Amla's figures in particular are astounding. I think England will be kicking themselves that they selected the wrong South African team to play for them!

  • zenboomerang on February 11, 2012, 9:37 GMT

    @S Rajesh... As usual stats can be "cherry picked" to say what you want to... Using the 2005 cut off, you have picked a period of time when Oz were at their weakest for well over 20 years... & you admit it... lol... Why not use the period from over 20 years ago when SA & SL were both playing Tests? That surely represents a period long enough to be statistically revelant - as any statistician would know & takes out the peaks & troughs...

  • rahulcricket007 on February 11, 2012, 8:45 GMT

    @ahemd mustafa kanjoo . please go to player information & record on cricinfo site & see the record of tendulkar before 2005 in overseas . you will see sachin making 12 centuries at overseas before 2005 . the stats are done from 2005 . at that time younis & yousuf were in their prime that's why their n average has been in 60s .

  • rahulcricket007 on February 11, 2012, 8:37 GMT

    @heathrfr1974 . LOL . AUS LOSE IND IN 1998 & 2001 BY 2-1 & LOSE IN SL IN 1998 BY 1-0 . AFTER 1969 AUS WON TEST SERIES IN INDIA IN 2004 . IF EARLIER RECORD HAS BEEN TAKEN THEN AUS RECORD WOULD HAVE BEEN BAD THEN THE ABOVE SHOWN RECORD .

  • Leggie on February 11, 2012, 8:23 GMT

    Rajesh, this is fantastic analysis. Can you please provide analysis for the period 2000 to 2011 before the India England series - which I would say is the Indian golden era. Also it would be interesting to know the all time top 10 performers in the two categories and a similar analysis for bowlers. Based on gut feel and what I have observed over 30+ years, I would think that Indian fast bowlers never really utilised the pace and bounce of overseas conditions and were better at home than abroad. Sadly this included the legend I most respect - kapil dev. Of course, this is the "feel" and would like to see what the stat says.

  • Nutcutlet on February 11, 2012, 7:54 GMT

    @Dravid Gravitas. Hi, again! You're absolutely correct about the greatness of Jacques Kallis and the lack of recognition that he has received. I wonder why he slips beneath the radar when we look around the world for great cricketers (and my definition of a great cricketer is one that transcends the age in which he plays (or played). Tentatively, I suggest it's to do with the understated nature of the man. He does not draw attention to himself, just goes on stacking up performance on performance. Besides this, he's playing in a side which contains several players who are very, very good (a category just below great!), even though he is their linch-pin. Perhaps there is a strong South African ethic that doesn't permit a giant of the game to be detached from his team, in the way Tendulkar, for instance, has appeared in the latter part of his career to have become detached from the Indian team. A man walking on his own is soon spotted; one walking with ten others is just one of a group.

  • Bollo on February 11, 2012, 6:39 GMT

    Forgot about Saqlain, 43 wickets at 34.

  • on February 11, 2012, 6:36 GMT

    Won't the BAN Players considered as subcontinent player?..I think Tamim Iqbal did well in ENG.

  • Bollo on February 11, 2012, 6:29 GMT

    Just based on overall test figures, here`s the best I`ve been able to come up with for Ind/Pak/SL bowlers away in Aus/Eng/SAf and vice versa;

    Warne: 116 wickets at 27 Murali: 95 at 29 Zak: 79 at 32 McGrath: 72 at 23 Pollock: 53 at 25 Steyn: 49 at 27 Gillespie: 46 at 26 Shoaib: 32 at 33 Swann: 21 at 31 Anderson: 21 at 38

    I`m sure I`ve missed some, but Warne`s problems in the subcontinent were clearly only confined to India!

  • world.cricketer on February 11, 2012, 6:06 GMT

    India lost its respect only in last 2 tours to ENG and AUS otherwise they are better than other asian teams in this period.

  • Bollo on February 11, 2012, 6:03 GMT

    I`d love to see some figures for individual bowlers as well - imagine Zaheer, Steyn, Anderson would have pretty decent records...McGrath and Gillespie if we take it back a couple of years.

  • Bollo on February 11, 2012, 5:45 GMT

    @haroonalvi. You inspired me to have a look at overall figures for away teams. W/L ratios first; Aus (1.27), Eng (0.88), SAf (0.76), WI (0.73), Pak (0.68), SL (0.38), Ind (0.37). Percentage of wins as follows; Aus (36%), Eng (31%), WI (30%), SAf (29%) Pak (26%), SL (19%), Ind (16%).

  • Bollo on February 11, 2012, 5:34 GMT

    @haroonalvi. I must admit I was sceptical of your assertion that `Amongst all test playing nations, the best win-loss ratio at home (in test matches) does not belong to Australia, but Pakistan`, but you`re absolutely right. Pakistan have a home W/L ration of 2.54, better than Aus (2.33), Sri Lanka (1.79), England (1.76) India (1.53) West Indies (1.52) and South Africa (1.28), an amazing record. If we look at percentage of wins on home soil however, the results are a little different. Aus (58%), Sri Lanka (41%), South Africa (41%), England (40%), Pakistan (37%), West Indies (35%) and India (32%) - these figures probably favour countries with more traditionally results-orientated pitches. Either way you look at it, that`s a pretty impressive home record for Pakistan, although they don`t seem to mind the conditions in the UAE either, if recent results are anything to go by...

  • heathrf1974 on February 11, 2012, 4:36 GMT

    The last five years Australia has been rebuilding, if this is Australia at it's worst then they'll be fine in the near future. There are not many players from Australia in some of the lists as many have retired over the last five years.

  • on February 11, 2012, 3:40 GMT

    It's great to see Younis and Yousaf as the best Asian batsmen overseas!

  • Vnott on February 11, 2012, 3:21 GMT

    It is a very probing article and shows " home" is where most people play well whether it is is India, Aus, England . The only world class team out there is RSA who play well in all conditions. If they learn to handle pressure well, RSA clearly shd be world no:1 and the rankings may show this in a few months too....

  • on February 11, 2012, 2:54 GMT

    Vaseem it looks like you have forgotten how Pakistan ended as 3-0, 2-0 and 5-0 when they were in AUS and in Eng I forgot but they lost 3-1 in test series. Pakistan was good team only during late 80s and early 90s thats it and India have been better team since early 2000. India has defeated England in England and have squared series in Aus and SA. Pakistan has never been close to defeating AUS or SA. They have OK record against England. Srilanka always had its moment but not they still dont have a comparable record to India or Pak. Pakistan have just started performing good in last 2 series and just wait for few months and there will be another fiasco coming soon. India never had bowlers but list of abovebBatsman are no where close to Gavaskar, Tendulkar or Dravid.

  • wake_up_india on February 11, 2012, 2:06 GMT

    I have been following cricket since the mid-sixties and the inability of most Indian batsmen to face fast, bouncy, swing bowling has been endemic at least since then. It seems to me that this deficiency flows fundamentally from the Indian batsmen's orthodox training to play with a straight (vertical) and (usually) heavy bat. This is good for delivering exquistie cover drives but it is very difficult to middle the ball when it is fast and seaming. In clear contrast, Australian batsmen frequently play drive shots with a horizontal bat that look likes they are wielding a tennis racquet. Clearly, the bat cannot weigh a ton for shots like that. Indian batsmen should take up tennis and baseball to break the straight bat habit.

  • boooonnie on February 11, 2012, 1:22 GMT

    One of the underlying assumptions of this article, and by many sub-continental cricket fans is that SA - AUST - ENG pitches and the conditions are the same - this is not true! Aust and SA share the same conditons BUT I would argue that Eng swinging conditions have been just as difficult for Aust players to deal with recently then the spinning sub-continental conditions. In fact I would argue that because of the high amount of cricket (both IPL & International) being played in India these days that Australian players are becoming more familiar with Indian conditions then English.

  • on February 11, 2012, 0:17 GMT

    Personally I do not think this analysis proofs anything. I have been following cricket since 1967 and in my opinion it is irrelevant whether you play home or away. If you are a talented team you will win in all conditions. Having seen all three major sub continent teams play abroad over the years, the team which has performed well is Pakistan. The reason for this is very simple. TEAM PAKISTAN has always had superior bowling compare to India and Sri Lanka and their batting over the years has not been that bad. Batsmen such as Majid Khan, Zaheer Abbas, Asif Iqbal, Javed Miandad, Salim Malik, Inzimam, Saeed Anwar, Imran Khan, Yunus and Yusuf have scored enough runs for Pakistani bowlers such as Wasim, Waqar, Imran, Shoaib, Gul, Aamir, Asif, Qadir, Mushtaq, Saqlain, Ajmal to win matches for them. In my opinion TEAM PAKISTAN is the only subcontinent team which can seriously over a long term period challenge Australia, England, South Africa, Newzealand and West Indies in their backyard.

  • on February 10, 2012, 22:26 GMT

    Top 3 Overseas Batsmen are all from RSA. Australians are in serious lack of quality batsmen. Only Mike Hussey 35 old veteran .... is holding the batting lineup and ricky ponting ... hopeful to see some new names in the list of sub-continent players

  • haroonalvi on February 10, 2012, 21:02 GMT

    Let me add another amazing statistic here. Amongst all test playing nations, the best win-loss ratio at home (in test matches) does not belong to Australia, but Pakistan. Check it out yourself..........this proves the fact that Pakistanis are humble winners.

  • peterhrt on February 10, 2012, 20:52 GMT

    To extend the analysis back in time, West Indies would need to be added. So who have been the most successful Asians in Australia, England, South Africa and West Indies? Of Asian batsmen with 3000 Test runs, 5 average fifty in these countries: Gavaskar, Tendulkar, Dravid, Mohinder Amarnath and Salim Malik. Gavaskar's average of 52 is highest. 8 others average forty. The most successful batsmen are made up of seven Indians, five Pakistanis and one Sri Lankan, Ranatunga. Azharuddin and Gambhir both average under 30.

    Of bowlers with 100 wickets overall, 8 Asians average under 30 in these countries. The most impressive are Imran (140 at 26), Murali (132 at 27), Wasim (131 at 27), Waqar (103 at 28) and Kapil Dev (137 at 29). Also qualifying are Mohammad Asif, Saeed Ajmal and Yadav. Big names who have been least effective there include Abdul Qadir (av 45), Vaas (44), Mankad (44) and Intikhab (55).

    Fast swing bowlers, mainly Pakistani, and Indian batsmen have adapted best.

  • on February 10, 2012, 19:57 GMT

    Shame that only 2 batsmen averaged over 50 outside subcontinent, while the list include the matchless giant names such as Inzi, Tendulkar, Sehwag, Ganguly and Dravid. Someone has rightly commented that we are lions at home.

  • on February 10, 2012, 19:30 GMT

    I think Younis and Yousuf the best Asian batsman overseas and so is Amla and Kallis!!

  • maddy20 on February 10, 2012, 19:21 GMT

    0.12 and 0.25? POMS and OZ take note. We have done better than you!

  • on February 10, 2012, 19:12 GMT

    Great analysis! What would be interesting to see is how dominant the same teams have been in the same period against the same opposition on their home turf. Are sub-continent batsmen stronger at home playing spin, than are Eng-Aus-RSA batsmen playing bounce in south Asia?

  • on February 10, 2012, 18:51 GMT

    Except that they are all non-Asian, England has nothing else in common with Australia and SA given their very different climatic conditions from the two southern hemisphere teams. That explains the difference within that group of three. It wd be instructive to see a similar comparison between SA and Aus in England and vice versa.

  • JUScruZN on February 10, 2012, 18:28 GMT

    There is no doubt that the Australian team of 1999 up to 2005 were one of the best teams ever.I would rate them as 1 of the 3 best teams ever, with only Bradman and Sobers teams competing for top honors. Yes you might have concluded that I am an Australian fan (but South African citizen), but no one can disagree that an team containing an Master of line and length in McGrath and an Legend of spin (best bowler ever if you ask me) in Sharne Warne contributed to the stats for teams outside Asia. Fact is that the Asian teams like all other teams prepare there pitches to benefit the home team. This is exceptable if you ask me, because the touring team should be able to adjust to different condition. Just think about it, if all pitches were flat then the teams do not need to tour since they are only going to encounter different ratios of support and weather nothing else. This adjustment between circumstances seperates the legendary teams from the seasonal best.

  • Avidcricketlover on February 10, 2012, 18:14 GMT

    Best Batsman of this era (without order) are Sachin, Lara, Kallis, Ponting, Dravid, Sangakkara, Graeme Smith, Mathew Hayden, Adam Gilchrist, Inzamam, Yousuf and Chanders. Some were entertaining (Sachin, Lara, Ponting, Hayden, Gilly). Some were Obdurate ( Chanderpaul, Dravid, Kallis). But they were all effective and at some point, I was made to sit up , notice and admire.

  • Avidcricketlover on February 10, 2012, 18:09 GMT

    For any one who has seen cricket for years will obviously rate Kallis to be better than Ponting. Make no mistake, I too enjoy watching Ponting bat, particularly the way he bats in South Africa or against them in Australia is a treat to watch. But he is not a complete batsman. He is pathetic against spin. Harbhajan in his peak owned him. I'm sure , if given a chance, Saeed Ajmal with his skills will make his retirement hasty. The best Australian batsman in the last 5 years has to be Michael Clarke. He is more reliable in all conditions and in all situations than Ponting ever was. Clarke doesn't match upto Ponting only in ODI's. Best ever Aussie player (omitting Don and considering he never played in sub-continent) should be Border or Hayden for the way they batted in sub-continent. I would go for Hayden for the way he dominated sub-continent in their peak, particularly the work he put in , in that India series.

  • on February 10, 2012, 18:06 GMT

    QED.. Hashim Amla is the best !

  • Avidcricketlover on February 10, 2012, 18:01 GMT

    These statistics are after 2005 by which Sachin's powers were said to have diminished. Its puzzling to see him still there. Leaving that aside, Kallis is the most improved player of all time. The reason he is not a legend is his first half of his career. He has become a stalwart in the last 7 years. He will surely join the pantheon of legends of Sachin, Ponting and Lara of this era.

    I would say this suggests only the current best crop and only recent statistics and does not make the complete picture. Because Kallis's statistics will reduce and Ponting will be reduced just a pathetic batsman while Dravid will be proved to be high class performer and Sachin to be much better than any you can even think of.

    For all Pakistan fans, I would still rate Inzi much higher than Younis and Miandad to be the best batsman you ever had, even bettering Zaheer Abbas, the run machine. Yousuf, though has a class of his own and can be considered to perform in all conditions.

  • TATTUs on February 10, 2012, 17:58 GMT

    Sub continent teams overseas 2001-2011

    INDIA 0.75-----PAKISTAN-----0.22------SRILANKA------0.10

    Overseas teams in Subcontinent 2001-2011

    AUSTRALIA 1.00------SOUTH AFRICA------0.42-------ENGLAND-----0.37

    SO its like

    AUSTRALIA>INDIA>SOUTHAFRICA>ENGLAND>SRILANKA

    END OF STORY!!!!!

  • correctcall on February 10, 2012, 17:18 GMT

    Rajesh - interesting analysis. So how about the next obvious step and recalculate the ICC points tables with a 50 % points premium for away wins and draws. The ICC should make this the standard but would Srinivasan allow that ?

  • on February 10, 2012, 17:07 GMT

    Quiet happy with India's performance actually. Had this analysis done before England or even Aus tour of India in which they lost 8 test now in row, India would have fared much better than other Asian teams.

  • NaniIndCri on February 10, 2012, 17:05 GMT

    All teams are worst at playing outside their area of comfort. Only SA and Aus are true fighters. They both carry the weight for the overrated Eng among overseas teams. Interesting to see Indian pace bowlers have avg. 36 and Pakistan has 30, not much difference when you see the hype given to Pakistan fast bowlers.

  • inswing on February 10, 2012, 17:04 GMT

    This shows that the best way to climb in rankings is to play more at home, or in conditions like home. Eng, Aus, and SA have played only 34 tests in the subcontinent, while subcontinent teams have played 49. India alone have played 21 tests overseas. Don't go out so much, India :)

  • johnathonjosephs on February 10, 2012, 16:35 GMT

    Sri Lanka and India have a higher win/loss ratio overseas than Australia or England? Who says we're flat track bullies? Where are the Poms and Aussies now?

  • johnathonjosephs on February 10, 2012, 16:32 GMT

    Wow. ALl those people who say Sri Lanka does the worst overseas, look at this, we do the best. Our batting is even better against pace in seaming/swinging conditions compared to Pakistan and India. It looks like the only problem Sri Lanka has is their pace bowling (spin bowling wizard Murali took some of that responsibility most of the time). Ironically India is the worst team overseas and England too. Surprised that South Africa has that much of a lead (almost double the rate) of Australia. South Africa truly is the best Test Team

  • alltimegreat on February 10, 2012, 16:22 GMT

    A perfect manual for all coaches in Asian teams and their boards. High time they see these statistics and bring the needed changes. In recent times, as you can see that SA and AUS are giving a good fight in Asian pitches because their boards have taken the interest for better results for their teams while the BCCI are sleeping expecting their ageing legends will get them through!! Time the Asian teams, players ,coaches and boards wake up and give the spectators some good cricket

  • sal485 on February 10, 2012, 16:16 GMT

    This is pathetic effort to undermine Yusuf and Yunus by saying that they performed in only one or two series.Records don,t lie.

  • on February 10, 2012, 16:09 GMT

    people who are saying that yousaf and younis' stats are due to one or two good series are not doing the justice. What if you exclude the innings played by Sachin at Sidney?? He would have a pretty modest record in Australia then

  • Bollo on February 10, 2012, 15:39 GMT

    @kurups. I would argue that there is nothing to suggest that `Surely South Africa is the best touring team`. In the past decade away Australia`s record is without peer (W34/L14/D11/W/L 2.21). South Africa`s record is (W18/L15/D14/W/l 1.20). Since 2005 their record is far closer, Aus (W18/L11/D10/W/L 1.64), South Africa (W13/L8/D9/W/L 1.63). For mine, despite some recent blips, Australia remain the benchmark.

  • on February 10, 2012, 15:34 GMT

    @Dravid_Gravitas Wow..that was one of the best comments I have read in cricinfo..I feel exactly same as you feel. But to come the same view from an indian was great..Kallis is one of the most underrated sportsman. If you look at the stats only, he has scored more runs than anyone in last 10-12 years..Even more than sachin tendulkar..you can check the stats if you dont believe me..And I guess his bowling average used to be better than of harbhajan singh and zaheer khan only 1-2 years ago..He has the highest number of century in this decade and the highest batting average..I dont understand why he his is so underrated..seriously !

  • kurups on February 10, 2012, 14:52 GMT

    Man, what a useful and interesting compilation of this statistical data..wel done Rajesh! Surely South Afria is the best touring team..and again you have to accept it is kind of easier to adapt to low bounce than to high bounce...which means it no rocket science for our boards to realise this fact and either simulate conditions of high bounce or tactically train our players overseas to get them better equipped overseas!! a tendulkar or sangakkara or younis dont happen very often in a generation!

  • on February 10, 2012, 14:25 GMT

    No matter how many articles you put up like this, India's recent performance is not gonna hide. Have some shame of holding the world cup in 2011. Australia won the world cup consecutive 3 times, they won the world cup because they were like champions, and they played like champions. India just got luck this world cup.

  • Bollo on February 10, 2012, 14:24 GMT

    If we look at the subcontinental teams in SAf/Aus/Eng since 2002 we see that India have a very similar record to SAf in Asia. W6, L15, D8, W/L .40. In those 8 series their record is identical, 1 win, 4 losses, 3 draws. Pakistan (3/17/1/.17)and Sri Lanka (2/11/5/.18) have similar records to England. Both of them have played 7 series, lost 6 and drawn 1.

    India have had clearly the best record of the subcontinental teams (although perhaps not the `dominance` in England and Australia in 2002, 2003 that someone was suggesting). Australia is streets ahead of all others. Only 6 series have been won in the last decade by an Asian team against 1 of the big 3 away, or one of them in Asia - 4 of those were by Australia.

  • Dravid_Pujara_Gravitas on February 10, 2012, 14:19 GMT

    I've always maintained that Kallis is the best batsman of this era along with Brian Lara. Wonder what he would be called if he was born in my country (India). That great man literally stood between India and a series victory with broken ribs (I think) in 2010. What a shame that he doesn't find a place in Cricinfo's Legends of Cricket Video Series. A real shame that. Cricinfo's credibility will take a beating if they don't include Kallis in that list. I have no doubt that he is miles ahead of my favourite cricketer Dravid and light years ahead of the hyped Sachin, who knows only to score freely, who doesn't know how to wade through difficult passages of play. Now that SA has some fine batsmen in Amla and AB, you can see how well Kallis is playing as per any given situation. Take a bow to The Greatest Cricketer Kallis since The Greatest Sir Don. No disrespect to Sir Gary. He is right up there neck to neck with Kallis. Sir Don, Sir Gary, Lara and Kallis are a class apart.

  • abcdef1234 on February 10, 2012, 14:01 GMT

    yousuf's number are this good because they are from 2005. if you consider his overall career in Aus/Eng/SAF, his average is 38 and Sachin's 52. so sachin >>> Yousuf

  • big_al_81 on February 10, 2012, 13:54 GMT

    Terrific article as so often from Mr Rajesh. My heart sank a bit when I saw the dates used excluded the period of Australian dominance overseas but in the end, I think it works well. For us England fans it doesn't make very positive reading as it excludes our decent records away outside Asia and shows that there is a real struggle in that continent. I'm not hopeful of great things in SL and India but both teams are far weaker than Pakistan and the one positive for England is that our bowling is so much better and deeper than in the past. Pakistan are the surprise package overall - but with two terrific batsmen in Yousuf and Younis plus a stream of good bowlers they are well-equipped to deal with a variety of conditions. SA are strange as they are often better away than they are at home! I like the comment about what Kallis's average would be if he'd spent half his career batting in the subcontinent. 75+?! The most underrated great cricketer ever?

  • on February 10, 2012, 13:52 GMT

    South Africa' consistency overseas is finally highlighted somewhat by this numbers exercise... I think many of the readers will be quite surprised to know that the Proteas haven't lost an overseas Test series since 2006... while Australia have lost in India (2) and England; England have lost in the West Indies, India, UAE and Sri Lanka...

  • on February 10, 2012, 13:45 GMT

    I dont understand what point people here are trying to make by saying if tendulkar would have been born in SA or if Kallis would have been born in India.......... Ridiculous really... If it would hv been so den tendulkar wouldnt be tendulkar nd kallis wouldnt be kallis..pointless arguement

  • on February 10, 2012, 13:44 GMT

    I guess all teams in the top 8 except Newzealand and West Indies have been performing well overall in the last 10 years. I hope they pickup their game.

    Further its futile to discuss who is the greatest individually as its always the widely regarded one not the most talented one

  • rahulcricket007 on February 10, 2012, 13:20 GMT

    @BEST BUDDY . YOU R SAYING THAT COMPARISON IS DONE IN A PARTICULAR PERIOD .THEN WHY NOT TAKE COMPARISON FROM 2010- PRESENT . YOU WILL SEE INDIA WINNING ONLY 1 MATCH , LOSE 9 MATCHES DRAWING 1 IN OVERSEAS . SACHIN , DRAVID BOTH AVERAGING UNDER 40S . SO INDIA IS WORST TRAVELLER & INDIAN BATSMEN ARE RUBBISH AT OVERSEAS .

  • dexterous9 on February 10, 2012, 13:15 GMT

    man if u pepole look at kallis stats u will find him not as good as sachin... kallis avg against aus is 39 in test and 35 in odis...he has struggled in tests in england....his odi strike rate is mere 72...even in flat wickets he play slow cricket... he doesn't have to play the 2nd best bowling attack(sa after aus).....his avg would have been significantly lesser had he played 4 ind....overall he is the second best after sachin as a player..and prob the third after sach,point in test batting and not even in top ten in odi....my odi 11 includes sachin,A.b.dev,kohli,amla,pointing,dhoni,hussey...... and test sachin,kallis,ponting,cook,sangakkara,dravid......

  • rahulcricket007 on February 10, 2012, 13:14 GMT

    @RYAN STEPHEN . AND JUST CHECK THE STATS OF KALLIS BEFORE 2005 . YOU WILL FIND THE EXACT REASON .

  • KAIRAVA on February 10, 2012, 13:12 GMT

    So, based purely on the above these stats (batting averages), if one gets to select the batting top 6 for the Asian XI for series played in Aus, Eng, SA, the lineup would be - Dilshan & Sangakkara (openers), Younis Khan, Sachin Tendulkar, Mohd Yousuf & Thilan Samaraweera, which means 3 Sri Lankans, 2 Pakistanis & just a lone Indian in the top 6 of the batting order would represent the Asian Test XI in the most challenging & difficult cricket playing conditions/nations outside the sub-continent. The major surprise is that there is no place for a Sehwag or a Dravid or a Laxman in this lineup and facts/figures about their averages support their exclusion strongly.

  • Bollo on February 10, 2012, 13:08 GMT

    Rajesh`s statistics give a very misleading idea of how these teams, particularly SAf and Aus, have performed comparatively in Asia. Since that series against Pakistan in 2002, here are the test match statistics for the 3 teams. Aus: W9, L5, D5, W/L 1.8; SAf: W3, L7, D7, W/L .43; Eng: W1, L9, D7, W/L .11. Overall: W13, L21, D19, W/L .62.

    The series results are even more stark. England have played 6 series in Asia during that time, lost 5 and drawn 1. South Africa in 8 series across the decade have won only 1 and lost 4 - hardly the very good record which Rajesh`s stats and numerous posters here are claiming.

    Australia on the other hand have played in 6 series, and won 4, including wins against all 3 subcontinental teams, and 3-0 clean sweeps of both Pakistan and Sri Lanka.

    Lies, damn lies, and statistics hey.

  • Haleos on February 10, 2012, 12:55 GMT

    From the very first comparision(Overseas problems) it is clear that there is not a lot to choose between the Asian teams as travellers and others to Asia. Why all the fuss.

  • Bollo on February 10, 2012, 12:53 GMT

    What is most misleading about this article is the seemingly arbitrary selection of 2005 as the year from which to begin the analysis. `The period during which Australia's overwhelming dominance overseas had come to an end` seems like a poor starting point, as does the incorrect assertion that this period is`long enough for teams to have toured each of the other countries at least once.` Australia`s performance is based entirely on the recent series against Sri Lanka, and the tours to India in 2008 and 2010. They have not played Pakistan in Asia since 2002, a nice round 10 years ago. Using this year as a starting point gives a far more meaningful, and less misleading, idea of how all of these teams and players have performed in Aus/RSA/Eng or Asia. cont`d

  • on February 10, 2012, 12:47 GMT

    To be honest I think this article is a waste of time. But still I read through it. Nothing new to me. You have bouncy pitches in some countries were the ball will come onto the bat and you can score runs. You have dust bowls were the ball doesn't come onto the bat and you have to work it more to get your runs. That's a no brainer for me. The only reason this article has come about because a lot of the media are saying that the Asian teams cannot travel outside their own country and that is what has lead to their downfold. Who cares. Pitches will always be different no matter where you travel. You create your pitches as home ground advantage to suit your team. That's it. If people think that there will ever be equal sided pitches for both teams then they are Naive. But Kallis has always been a great player. As @Lourens Brink said a rock. That is why I am not surprised to see him at the top of the ladder. Ponting hasn't had the greatest years and Lara and Tendulkar well need I say more.

  • chitraj on February 10, 2012, 12:46 GMT

    These stats clearly show, what has been known for a while, but never really discussed:

    1) The non asian teams and England in particular are poor travellers. I think it is useful to stress this point because there is this constant cloud that hovers above the asian teams regarding their ability to travel. But the situation is identical for the non asian teams and in some cases worse 2) South Africa is the best test team in the world. I agree that if you increase the sample period, India will probably appear as a close competitor. But on current form its definitely South Africa- not India and definitely not England.

  • anindya_mozumdar on February 10, 2012, 12:36 GMT

    Australia won a four match series 2-1 against India in 2004-05.

  • on February 10, 2012, 11:58 GMT

    Kallis has an average of 86 in Asia, whereas Ponting's is 41. I wonder what stas Kallis would have if he was born in India and played half his Test matches on Asian wickets rather than South African ones?

  • singhikv on February 10, 2012, 11:42 GMT

    I just want to state that Australian teams in the past (pre-1980) have toured the sub-continent and thrashed the sub-continent teams regularly. And we cannot say that the quality of spinners are much better now because we had world class spinners like Subhash Gupte, Prasanna, Bedi, Chandrasekhar etc. even in those days. I feel that the pitches were much more sporting in the "good-old" days compared to the dust bowls that are prepared today in the guise of "home advantage". Probably that is why Gambhir claimed that when the Australians visit India "We will show them"!! Definitely we have very good batsmen in the sub-continent teams today.

  • Spelele on February 10, 2012, 11:16 GMT

    It is now clear that PAK selectors should swallow their pride and recall Yousuf into the Test squad. He is by far the best Asian batsman outside Asia (and not Tendulkar!). Although he has good stats in Aus and Eng, Tendulkar's average in SA is below par. This is due to the fact that Dravid and Laxman have also struggled in SA. The inescapable conclusion to draw is that Tendulkar has done well only where and when at least one of these two have also done well. This clearly gets rid of the ridiculous argument that Tendulkar (despite his inferior stats) is greater than Kallis and Ponting because they had support from other batsmen while he - so the argument goes - was always stranded as the lone performer. If Younis and Yousuf were from India, they'd be labelled as "Gods of batting". Shows you how biased Asian fans are against fellow Asian teams' players. Overall, these stats reveal that recently, but for a couple of unlucky drawn series at home, SA has dominated world cricket all-round.

  • nzcricket174 on February 10, 2012, 11:06 GMT

    Nice article, but sadly these statistics have forgotten India's batting dream in Aussie (03/04) and how Dravid was at his peak before 2005.

  • nzcricket174 on February 10, 2012, 10:56 GMT

    Hi there Cricinfo, just letting you know that the difference between any two numbers is always a positive number. Just thought you may want to correct that.

  • Spelele on February 10, 2012, 10:56 GMT

    Oh well, England can't play spin, so what? Nobody considers this to be a suprise. England should learn from SA. Initially, SA were vulnurable against good spinners. They then put into effect a plan to produce pitches that take turn early on in Test matches in order to get used to playing on subcontinent-type pitches. Ask some visitting spinners, they'll tell you how much they've enjoyed bowling in SA. Bhaji spun India to victory in Durban in 2010, and would have done the same in Capetown where he picked up a 7 wicket haul. It took all of the great Kallis's skill and experience for SA to save the match as he notched up 100s in each innings. Herath spun Srilanka to victory in Durban in 2011 December, and Tahir just about did the same for SA in Capetown in the last match of that series. Swann has picked up numerous 5-fors in SA, and even Harris has spun SA to victory against AUS and INDIA! in SA. A few matches were lost, but the plan has certainly made SA better in the subcontinent.

  • Samar_Singh on February 10, 2012, 10:40 GMT

    Kallis is the greatest player ever to play cricket .. he is got all weapons of cricket ... Just check his stat with bat, ball and catches... also in different conditions and wickets ... There is no comparison to Jaques...

  • on February 10, 2012, 10:39 GMT

    South Africa's Jacques Kallis is one of the greats of the game. Ponting, Lara and Tendulkar were the more flashy and flamboyant players, where Kallis were the rock of the South African line-up. Remember, for many years Kallis was the one batsman that the others batted around and he kept things together. Having Kallis and Amla in the same team as well as De Villiers really makes a huge difference.

    Tendulkar started his career at a young age, but had he been born in South Africa he would've struggled to score as many runs as he did. It's easier in the subcontinent where the pitches are generally flat. Much harder on South African and Australian soil for a young teenager. He would probably have had his start at the age of 19 or 20. Not 16. Tendulkar would also probably have scored a few hundreds less than he had now. Not sure how many he's scored in the subcontinent.

    What Kallis has above him and Ponting is the extra workload. He took 250+ wickets and is an exceptional fielder

  • on February 10, 2012, 10:08 GMT

    So Ricky Ponting and Sachin Tendulkar are regarded as 2 of the greatest batsmen in the modern era, along with Brian Lara. Yet no mention of King Kallis. For 13 dismissals in Asia since 2005, Kallis has scored more than Ricky Ponting and Michael Clarke COMBINED!! And this in a period when teams at home have dominated. Kallis has now surely surpassed Ponting in terms of the greatest batsmen of the modern era. 1. Sachin 2. King Kallis 3. Lara

  • on February 10, 2012, 10:06 GMT

    Agree with HLANGL, India's victories against Aus in India have mostly been hard-fought (1 of 2 wins on the last tour of Aus in India was comprehensive). Its usually a hard fought victory and also typically a very inept performance/failure when india loses abroad. In fact over the past decade, this is a compliment to indian team, lot of matches which could turn either way were won by the team. And we also managed to avoid a few defeats by the skin of our teeth. In eng in 2007 i guess, sreesanth was plumb out but Bucknor the miuch reviled one gave him not out saving the first test for india. India then went on to win the series easily.

  • on February 10, 2012, 9:59 GMT

    SACHIN IS "KING OF KINGS" INDIAN SUBCONTINENT OR ABROAD. EVERYBODY MILES AWAY FROM SACHIN. IF WE ONE DAYERS TOO.. SACHIN IS THE ULTIMATE KING IN ALL ERA'S WHETER ANYONE LIKES IT OR NOT. BOW TO THE THE BEST BATSMEN OF ALL TIME "SACHIN RAMESH TENDULKAR"

  • rahulcricket007 on February 10, 2012, 9:58 GMT

    @SHOVWAR . CHECK THE 2004 SERIES B/W IND-SA IN INDIA , INDIA WON THAT SERIES BY 1-0 . PLEASE CHECK STATS .

  • on February 10, 2012, 9:52 GMT

    Can anyone help me with the place where I could get this data from , I am looking out for a place from where I could source data and do some mathematic, any help would be appreciated. Thanks.

  • bestbuddy on February 10, 2012, 9:23 GMT

    @Asghar_Shahzad: Why? Most current players have not played much before 2005, so including stats from before then would not be an accurate reflection of how teams perform NOW. @Rajesh Sood: That is why cricket is so interesting, because the conditions changing from country to country means some weaker teams can win games. You're asking for a ManU to come along a la Australia from 1994-2007, who win everything and make cricket boring. @rahulcricket007, S Rajesh clearly states he's selected a period where everyone has managed home and away tours, or a period inlcuding as many current players as possible. DURING THIS PERIOD Butt has not performed better than Dravid, but has averaged more. @drinks_break, SA averaged more against spin than Aus or Eng managed against spin OR pace, so clearly they DIDN'T have an issue with spin, they just found subcontinent seamers completely unthreatening...

  • chokkashokka on February 10, 2012, 9:17 GMT

    clearly the sub continental teams to need to prepare more challeging slower and lower turners for the visitors - that is only fair thing to do here. From what's been on display in the past year or so, the english, aussie and SA teams have prepared very challenging wickets for the visiting sub continental teams which are diammetrically opposed to the conditions in sun continent. The courtesy needs to be reciprocrated with equally challenging wickets at home on the sub continent. We need to see more exciting matches in the sub continent where 20 wickets fall in a day dominated by spin - just like pace dominates in england, australia and SA. Glad someone wrote a piece on this - lots been written about the hapless sub continental travelling to england, australia and SA. Lets write as much about the those teams visiting the sub continent and more importantly the curators in the sub continent should be applauded for preparing rank turners. Its all about making adjustments.

  • on February 10, 2012, 8:59 GMT

    Will now people accept kallis's greatness? he is good everywhere,in home,in away,in batting,in bowling,in catching.

  • on February 10, 2012, 8:59 GMT

    2005 to now is big time period to consider. Almost 7 yrs to make a judgement is not fair. Lot of players have retired during this time. For example : Inzamam was retired in 2007. Muhammad Yousuf hasn't played since 2009/10. This is same with Australia, many changes happened to them in last 7 yrs. I would suggest to judge the teams in last 2 yrs. This will give much clearer picture. Pakistan is not bad as it show in the stats. It has just white washed England. Same with England, it doesn't deserve to be no 1 team. Sri lanka had the tough last 9 months but before that they were doing very good.

  • on February 10, 2012, 8:47 GMT

    sa beats all teams when it comes to overseas stats - we unbeaten away since 2006

  • nadsherwani on February 10, 2012, 8:29 GMT

    I think it is unfair to dismiss Younis and Yousaf's stats as due to 1 - 2 good series. Cricket stats are always averages and indeed even supposedly 'great' Indian batsmen have been benefited from one or two brilliant series or even innings. Credit must be given where due with out any biases. The fact which remains and cannot be denied is that both these batsmen have the highest batting averages among Asians against Aus/SA/WI/NZ in away series overall and especially against pace.

  • rahulcricket007 on February 10, 2012, 8:28 GMT

    @S RAJESH . HERE IS DRAVID'S OVERALL RECORD IN OVERSEAS MATCHES IN SA , ENG , AUS ,NZ (IN NZ SERIES I ONLY COUNT 1999 SERIES & 2002 BECAUSE AT THAT TIME NZ WAS A STRONG TEAM) . DRAVID 'S RECORD : 3291 RUNS , 67 DISMISSALS , AVERAGE OF 49.11 ( NOT 34 WHICH YOU HAD SHOWN) , 13 CENTURIES IN AUS, ENG,SA , NZ (IN NZ ONLY COUNTING 1999 & 2002 TOUR) . OUT OF THIS 7 CENTURIES HAS COME IN ENGLAND WHERE BOWL SWINGS SO MUCH . PLEASE DON'T SHOW HALF STATS , IF YOU HAVE TO SHOW THEN PLAESE SHOW FULL . ACCORDING TO YOUR COMPARISON SALMAN BUTT & DILSHAN ARE BETTER TEST BATSMEN THEN DRAVID WHICH IS NOT TRUE .

  • siabbasi on February 10, 2012, 8:26 GMT

    Nice article - break up is awesome. J Kallis certainly my pick of travelers that visit Asia, a class player.

  • HLANGL on February 10, 2012, 8:25 GMT

    This further confirms the fact that what's more important is not that you have lost something, but the way that you have lost it. The subcontinental sides India, SL, Pakistan, etc. will loose games by huge margins quite frequently whenever they travel outside their own territory. In contrast, when it comes to Aus & to a lesser extent SA & Eng, they will also loose games outside their territory but still they will give some decent fight & make their opponents to work harder to earn the victories.So even if the win/loss ratio seems to be more or less the same, the gap between the performances are quite drastic & huge if you analyze each win & loss in detail.One will loose haplessly & pathetically under unfamiliar conditions & will win only marginally even under their familiar conditions.The other will also loose under the conditions which are unfamiliar to them, still they won't loose quite so haplessly & pathetically, and when they win under their conditions, they will win comfortably.

  • drinks.break on February 10, 2012, 8:25 GMT

    I'd take issue with your interpretation of the stats at one point. You say, "The challenge for visiting teams in Asia is spin bowling". That's only true for SA. Eng has virtually identical stats for pace and spin, while Australia's stats for spin are superior to their stats for pace (thanks, I presume, to good players of spin like Clarke, Ponting and Hussey).

    It would be more accurate to say that visiting teams in Asia are equally comfortable against pace or spin, with the numbers skewed a little by SA'a exceptional figures against pace.

  • HLANGL on February 10, 2012, 8:24 GMT

    This further confirms the fact that what's more important is not that you have lost something, but the way that you have lost it. The subcontinental sides India, SL, Pakistan, etc. will loose games by huge margins quite frequently whenever they travel outside their own territory. In contrast, when it comes to Aus & to a lesser extent SA & Eng, they will also loose games outside their territory but still they will give some decent fight & make their opponents to work harder to earn the victories.So even if the win/loss ratio seems to be more or less the same, the gap between the performances are quite drastic & huge if you analyze each win & loss in detail.One will loose haplessly & pathetically under unfamiliar conditions & will win only marginally even under their familiar conditions.The other will also loose under the conditions which are unfamiliar to them, still they won't loose quite so haplessly & pathetically, and when they win under their conditions, they will win comfortably.

  • SAcricFan on February 10, 2012, 8:23 GMT

    South Africa has fared very well in subcontinent but has let themselves down the last few years at home with games they should have won, this is the reason they not clear ahead of the pack as the Number 1 ranked team but rather hovering around the number 2 spot...

  • on February 10, 2012, 8:21 GMT

    The missing element of this analysis is the variation between Asian teams touring within Asia versus their performance outside, and the same for non-Asian teams. I would expect that the home games, which will be disproportionately high, would be dragging some of those numbers up.

    If you travel within your comfort zone and do well, and then go outside your comfort zone and do badly, then you can't adapt to the conditions. If you do poorly on similar pitches that aren't home games, then you're a bad traveller.

  • Asghar_Shahzad on February 10, 2012, 8:17 GMT

    This is strange kind of analysis. For a fair and in-depth analysis, the author should include complete data covering all test matches played among countries mentioned in in this article.

  • on February 10, 2012, 8:15 GMT

    This is why Cricket is so frustrating these days !

    Tired of seeing subcontinent sides play woefully against pace and bored of seeing western sides lose against spin. The best thing would be something like the English Premier League (football) with the best players playing on the same team.

    The each side would have good spinners, bowlers who can really bowl fast and batsmen for every condition.

  • on February 10, 2012, 7:57 GMT

    some kind of cheerish to the indian fans...., that not only v can't perform in da overseas. but even other countries suffer..!!

  • rahulcricket007 on February 10, 2012, 7:23 GMT

    PONTING 'S AVERAGE 47 IS BECAUSE HE WAS SUCCEESSFULL IN LAST 2 TOURS OF INDIA . IF WRITER HAS INCLUDED HIS 2001 'S TOUR PERFORMANCE WHERE HE MADE ONLY 17 RUNS IN 3 TEST ( 5INNINGS ) , HIS AVERAGE WOULD HAVE BEEN UNDER 40 . IF YOU WANT TO COMPARE STATS THEN PLEASE COMPARE IT WITH FULL FROM 2000 . THESE STATS ARE HALF DONE. MOST INDIAN BATSMEN ARE IN DISADVANTAGE HERE ESPECIALLY DRAVID'S CASE LOOKS VERY VULNERABLE .HE WAS IN PEAK DURING 2001-2005 .

  • rahulcricket007 on February 10, 2012, 7:16 GMT

    WHY THIS STATS HAS START FROM 2005 ? MOST INDIAN BATSMEN LIKE DRAVID , GANGULY WERE SUCESFULL ON 2002 ENG & 2004 AUS TOUR .. DRAVID'S AVERAGE LOOKS 34 OUTSIDE SUBCONTINENT BUT WE ALL KNOW HE SCORED OVER 600 RUNS IN 4 TESTS IN AUS IN 2004 & SCORED A CENTURY IN HEADINGLY 2002 & DOUBLE TON 217 IN OVAL IN 2002 . IF STATS AFTER 2000 WOULD HAVE TAKEN DRAVID 'S AVERAGE OVERSEAS WOULD HAVE BEEN 50 + . THIS ANALYSIS IS RUBBISH . DOES THE OVERSEAS TOUR BEFORE 2005 DOESN'T COUNT ?

  • varunrallapalli on February 10, 2012, 7:16 GMT

    This article is a statistician's delight. Great analysis by the writer. India, Srilanka and Pakistan have been poor travelers for sometime now,its better these teams beef up their individual departments with personnel with more experience in overseas conditions like in South Africa, Australia and England. They can experience bounce in Australia and South Africa and Swing in England. If under 19 teams are made to travel more to these countries youngsters can learn. It is also true that its easier to cope up and acclimatize with low bounce than high bounce.One more thing is that India have contributed to eight of the overseas losses in the latter period so the blame should be placed fair and square on India to a large extent for bad performance of Asian teams.

  • anindya_mozumdar on February 10, 2012, 7:14 GMT

    India's records are particularly better by their no show (that is very few matches) prior to 2011 which must rank as one of their best over seas years ever.

  • Hafeez_Malik on February 10, 2012, 7:06 GMT

    Bell is their best batsman in subcontinental pitches .... and they have dropped them???!!!!

  • S.Alis on February 10, 2012, 7:05 GMT

    Oh mistake.. Consider Average and it's Younis Khan best batsman in Aus, Eng and RSA since Jan 2005.

  • S.Alis on February 10, 2012, 7:02 GMT

    Considering Average, Mohammad Yousuf is best batsman on Aus/Eng/RSA pitches since Jan 2005. That's good to know.

  • on February 10, 2012, 7:02 GMT

    Superb analysis. Mohd. Yousuf and Younis Khan in particular are the surprise aces of the pack.

  • on February 10, 2012, 6:41 GMT

    Without an estimate of variance, all this is quite irrelevant. Don't get me wrong, the hypothesis is quite relevant, and well formulated. Nevertheless, as long as your are analyzing numbers and making conclusions, you need explicit statistical tests. I.e., you can't make the conclusions you make based solely on the averages you have presented here. It can be terribly misleading. Is it? You tell me!

  • highveldhillbilly on February 10, 2012, 6:37 GMT

    So my take: SA - most consistent side in the past 6 years and they actually play spin well Pakistan - Excellent bowlers, poor batting India - oh the fall has been terrible! Sri Lanka - Without Murali they are in serious trouble

  • shovwar on February 10, 2012, 6:36 GMT

    Atlast!! Some facts. for the last few years the competition got tougher between teams. There was a time when India played a huge amount of Test at home and took the no.1 ranking but recently when they started to to step outside, reality hit hard. England really poor away from home do not deserve the no.1 ranking at all. Aussies are not even the shadows of the past. Pakistan had their back against the wall but are improving in an alarming rate but still not no.1. SL not even a question at the moment...Then who....??? Its clear and it does not rocket scientist to figure out that SA is the most Balanced Test team at both home and away. They are the first team to beat Australia at home and end their Era. They beat Pakistan in Pakistan and in UAE since 2005. They Beat England in England and Drew at home (unlucky). Out of four Test series against India, 2 in India and 2 in SA. They won 1 series and drew 3. that makes it 1-0 for SA. India could not Beat SA at their own ground in 2 test series

  • Shankk on February 10, 2012, 6:32 GMT

    India has the best batting line up overall,but still i dont understand why it doesnt succeed overseas.gud luck india.

  • on February 10, 2012, 6:31 GMT

    Younis Khan is the best of the lot, comparing, he is not a 'great' batsman. Yet, he has maintained a remarkable average overseas. He doesn't score big, but scores consistently.

  • stormy16 on February 10, 2012, 6:30 GMT

    Interesting numbers and amazing the performance of SA which stands head and shoulders above other visting teams to Asia. The biggest concern would be for SL whose numbers reflect the influence of Murali over a long period of time and without him or anyone even close to him, SL faces the greatest challenge both at home and away. What it also shows is the adjustment to spin is probably and easier one to make than the adjustment to pace, seam and bounce.

  • SST19 on February 10, 2012, 6:27 GMT

    This analysis is after India's two disastrous tour of Aus & Eng, it's took lot of toll on Ind & Indial player stats, otherwise Ind fared much better in 2000 to 2011 before Eng tour. Second best touring team after Aus. It's better if this analysis for 10 year period. Also great players like kallis has poor record in eng & aus and ponting has in eng somewhat similar pace friendly playing condition. whereas Sachin still avg about 55 in Aus & Eng (before recent debacle he was averaging around 60).

  • Jawwad123 on February 10, 2012, 6:20 GMT

    Tamim Iqbal should have been included in the Subcontinent batsmen overseas list. Although Bangladesh has a terrible record in tests; some individual performances could've been taken into account.

  • on February 10, 2012, 6:20 GMT

    Bangladesh's terrible record in Test cricket disqualifies them immediately

    All stats exclude matches in Bangladesh

    Ha ha ha and their own Premier League copying the IPL was all they needed to improve on their status as an undeserved test nation ...

  • on February 10, 2012, 6:18 GMT

    @satish619chandar If the curator can leave a bit of moisture on the pitches to aid seam movement and skidding early I think we can have conditions for quicks as well.Once the sun comes out the pitch should bake and later crumble under the excess heat as the game goes on aiding spin.In centers like Kotla where the winters can be foggy the curators can maybe try greentops to produce seaming conditions.

  • on February 10, 2012, 6:01 GMT

    A classic example where statistics fails to capture the real story. The above analysis does not (rather does not have a scope to) mention how Sourav Ganguly's India between 2000-2005 fared way above Pakistan and Sri Lanka in western countries. Just look at the number of draws they have secured. India dominated England and Australia, respective, in 2002 and 2003 at their backyards, and put up a serious fight against South Africa in 2001. Further what this article does not cover, they had won series' in Pakistan and Zimbabwe, still very strong at home, and drew series in Sri Lanka, very strong at home, during that period. Not to mention defeating Bangladesh in Bangaldesh. This statistics 'bikini' is concealing too much!

  • ansram on February 10, 2012, 5:54 GMT

    India's records are particularly marred by their dismal show in 2011 which must rank as one of their worst over seas years ever.

  • satish619chandar on February 10, 2012, 5:48 GMT

    Aus, Eng, RSA WL ratio 0.31 with 13 Draws. Ind, Pak, SL WL ratio 0.28 with 8 draws. The flat conditions in subcontinent had produced more draws which caused the little bit difference.. That is why i would love subcontinent to produce some tracks which aids spin more in order to produce results.. Pretty difficult to produce fast tracks here due to the climatic conditions.. Having turning tracks atleast can produce more result oriented matches.. Can aid the home teams too.. Just looking into stats, SA had paved better in subcontinent compared to other two in recent times.. Just look at the averages of their top 4.. Smith being the lowest at 44.. That is a very good record to have..

  • on February 10, 2012, 5:47 GMT

    Nice interesting article.Highlights a few important points: 1.There is no clear no.1 in World Cricket at present. 2.Before 8-0 India were the best travellers outside the subcontinent. 3.South Africa have fared the best among teams touring the subcontinent. 4.England are the worst touring team in the subcontinent with Australia only faring marginally better due to a 1-0 win in Sri Lanka and both their series in India were close despite 2-0 losses. 5.Sachin is the best subcontinent batsman away.Converse holds true for Amla. So in conclusion is it back to the times when subcontinent teams will be battered by pace and swing while Aus,Eng and SA will suffer against spin and turn?

  • on February 10, 2012, 5:46 GMT

    Nice for breaking down some myths - excluding the recent dismal performance - India actually/ deservedly was ranked in the higher reaches in Test cricket. 8/13 losses coming only in the last season. Sangakkara and Tendulkar are two of the best subcontinent batsmen while playing outside home comforts, beating the supposedly better technically equipped men like Dravid, Jayawardene etc. Yousuf and Younis's stats are impressive, but decidedly bloated by 1 good season each. Pakistan's bowling attack is the best of the touring lot, which is why they've won more tests even in the era of WI dominance in 80s, or Australian dominance in 90s. It's time Kallis gets his due as a bonafide great. He might not dazzle, but he rarely has a bad series. Ponting has come a long way from his spin struggles in India. England has the best all-round bowling attack for touring now, their batting though .. unlike SA, remains woefully below par outside home.

  • on February 10, 2012, 5:42 GMT

    Interesting stats. However if we take out the last couple of years, Asian teams have done fairly well in England at least. Pak won there in 87,92,96 and drew in 2001 I believe. I also remember the days when new entrants into the Indian team, Dravid and Ganguly were piling up the runs in the England...I assume SL would have done well too...

    However, now either its a fault in the technique of asian batsmen or just that England seamers have improved...that we are now losing in England.

  • Sunman81 on February 10, 2012, 5:13 GMT

    great stats... good one!

  • Muzammalgujjar on February 10, 2012, 5:05 GMT

    Very gud article.pakistani gud than other asian.

  • Cool_Jeeves on February 10, 2012, 4:54 GMT

    Wow. Excellent Article. Congratulations.

  • kingsafu on February 10, 2012, 4:39 GMT

    in the "Batting and bowling stats when touring" for Sa,Aus,Eng the difference should have been -4.8 and not 4.8

  • on February 10, 2012, 4:37 GMT

    This is great analysis.. I've been curious on the difference travelling makes, especially with India being miserable in England and vice versa.

    Like soccer it may benefit the national team if more players played overseas. e.g. South Americans playing in Europe.

  • sawifan on February 10, 2012, 4:37 GMT

    interesting to see Ponting's stats here are respectable. Obviously his struggles in the sub-continent have changed somewhat from earlier in his career.

  • Gizza on February 10, 2012, 4:31 GMT

    Interesting analysis though if the Windies and NZ were excluded on the basis that they are bad everywhere (including home) I think Sri Lanka should also be excluded since they have lost at home a fair few times as well. I remember Australia inflicting a 3-0 whitewash against them where Warne took a five-for in nearly every innings. You have to remember this analysis is for Tests and not the limited overs formats. I only think there are 5 teams which have made their home country a fortress in recent times which are Australia, South Africa, England, India and Pakistan. Either excluding Sri Lanka, or including the West Indies and New Zealand (but not Zim or Bang) would have made the figures much tighter than you otherwise suggest.

  • silly_pt on February 10, 2012, 4:17 GMT

    Finally, the stats I was looking for. Following things are very much clear. In recent times 1. India isn't as bad traveler outside Asia as England in Asia.(pity that 8 out of those 13 losses have come in last 2 series only) 2. Pakistan is best team from subcontinent & it's largely because of their supreme bowling attack 3. South Africa is by far best team in Asia & their batting is most capable. 4.Sachin Tendulkar is best Indian batsman everywhere on earth. Cricinfo publish.

  • on February 10, 2012, 4:16 GMT

    so this makes sAfrica the best team in the world

  • on February 10, 2012, 4:11 GMT

    Please provide stats atleast from 1999 - 2000. There are few batsmen who are at clear disadvantage because of this exclusion.

  • on February 10, 2012, 3:56 GMT

    Younis and Yousuf are the best Asian batsmen overseas and even then their batting skills are hugely under rated. They are way better than the likes of Laxmans, Sehwags and Jayawardenas as the stats suggest. Tendulkar, Younis, Yousuf, Dravid, Sangakkara have been the best 5 Asian batsmen in the past 7 or 8 years.

  • Jwara on February 10, 2012, 3:55 GMT

    Nice article. At least it dispels the notion that South African players can't play spin. But re-inforces the one about harris being totally useles. The asian sides lose way more than they draw when going overseas. If they were to start by not losing test matches it would lead to better results in future.

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  • Jwara on February 10, 2012, 3:55 GMT

    Nice article. At least it dispels the notion that South African players can't play spin. But re-inforces the one about harris being totally useles. The asian sides lose way more than they draw when going overseas. If they were to start by not losing test matches it would lead to better results in future.

  • on February 10, 2012, 3:56 GMT

    Younis and Yousuf are the best Asian batsmen overseas and even then their batting skills are hugely under rated. They are way better than the likes of Laxmans, Sehwags and Jayawardenas as the stats suggest. Tendulkar, Younis, Yousuf, Dravid, Sangakkara have been the best 5 Asian batsmen in the past 7 or 8 years.

  • on February 10, 2012, 4:11 GMT

    Please provide stats atleast from 1999 - 2000. There are few batsmen who are at clear disadvantage because of this exclusion.

  • on February 10, 2012, 4:16 GMT

    so this makes sAfrica the best team in the world

  • silly_pt on February 10, 2012, 4:17 GMT

    Finally, the stats I was looking for. Following things are very much clear. In recent times 1. India isn't as bad traveler outside Asia as England in Asia.(pity that 8 out of those 13 losses have come in last 2 series only) 2. Pakistan is best team from subcontinent & it's largely because of their supreme bowling attack 3. South Africa is by far best team in Asia & their batting is most capable. 4.Sachin Tendulkar is best Indian batsman everywhere on earth. Cricinfo publish.

  • Gizza on February 10, 2012, 4:31 GMT

    Interesting analysis though if the Windies and NZ were excluded on the basis that they are bad everywhere (including home) I think Sri Lanka should also be excluded since they have lost at home a fair few times as well. I remember Australia inflicting a 3-0 whitewash against them where Warne took a five-for in nearly every innings. You have to remember this analysis is for Tests and not the limited overs formats. I only think there are 5 teams which have made their home country a fortress in recent times which are Australia, South Africa, England, India and Pakistan. Either excluding Sri Lanka, or including the West Indies and New Zealand (but not Zim or Bang) would have made the figures much tighter than you otherwise suggest.

  • sawifan on February 10, 2012, 4:37 GMT

    interesting to see Ponting's stats here are respectable. Obviously his struggles in the sub-continent have changed somewhat from earlier in his career.

  • on February 10, 2012, 4:37 GMT

    This is great analysis.. I've been curious on the difference travelling makes, especially with India being miserable in England and vice versa.

    Like soccer it may benefit the national team if more players played overseas. e.g. South Americans playing in Europe.

  • kingsafu on February 10, 2012, 4:39 GMT

    in the "Batting and bowling stats when touring" for Sa,Aus,Eng the difference should have been -4.8 and not 4.8

  • Cool_Jeeves on February 10, 2012, 4:54 GMT

    Wow. Excellent Article. Congratulations.