Gordon Greenidge September 15, 2012

'I had the perfect start to my Test career'

Interview by Jack Wilson
Gordon Greenidge remembers the man who had a huge influence on his life, and also his very attacking batting partner
  shares 45

First cricket bat
When I was very young I had a massive bat made by Stuart Surridge. It had been soaked and soaked in linseed oil for years and it was very heavy. I wasn't the biggest as a young lad, and when I went out to bat I could hardly lift the bloody thing.

First idol
There have been lots of people that I've admired but there's only one person I'd call an idol. That man was John Arlott, and I'm proud to say that he was hugely influential in my life. He was a massive reason I signed for Hampshire and I had a huge amount of respect for him. He was a great man in and out of cricket. I'm lucky that my idol was also my friend.

First century
(Laughs) I've hit a few! I can honestly say I can't remember my first one. It probably came in a youth team cricket with that big Stuart Surridge bat. I've always enjoyed batting ever since I started playing.

First Test match
I was 23 at the time and we were playing against India in Bangalore. A lot was made of the fact that we wouldn't win because India had a quality spin attack and that the pitches would turn yards. It was almost as if the excuses were being made before we'd even played them. We won the game, which was nice, and I scored a second-innings century, which put the icing on the cake. It was the perfect start to my Test career.

First time I batted with Desmond Haynes
When he first came into the team he was a young man who liked to attack everything. He went out there and played his shots and looked like he wanted to hit every ball out the park. I remember on his West Indies debut he got to 50 very quickly and I was impressed when I saw him there. After that he learned to calm it down and he was a dream to bat with. We didn't do too badly together after all, did we?

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • Alexk400 on September 19, 2012, 0:01 GMT

    Sehwag at his prime better than CG but now a days sehwag becoming Shaid afridi.. HIT or MISS on everything

  • on September 17, 2012, 23:40 GMT

    He was destructive aggressiveness personified and when he hit it (hard) it stayed hit. After he had retired from the first class game the last time I saw him play was for Lashings CC an invitational XI for ex-test match players and in that match he hit one of the longest and highest straight sixes I've ever seen..at the age of 56!!! He deserves his place amongst the finest ever in his position as 92 first class centuries suggests. There may be current openers with better averages but he is right up there with the best - his overall record more than stacks up against the contemporaries of his time but his defining innings has to be the murderous and brutal 214 * at Lords in 1984.. another knock I was privileged to see. It was and has to remain arguably the greatest individual fourth innings effort by ANY batsman to win ANY game as some of his 29 fours that day were among IMO the most savage and powerful boundaries ever hit.

  • on September 17, 2012, 18:36 GMT

    Sehwag Vs Greenidge? Don't make me laugh. If you saw both of them live, up close & personal as the saying goes, and you know even a little about batsmanship, you will plump for CG, the consummate professional. Sehwag's a swashbuckler who more often than not, gifts his wicket. CG never did that. Sehwag plays a lot more cricket and against more mediocre teams than CG and will wind up surpassing CG's 108 Tests soon. As such, has lots more opportunities to gorge himself on second-rate bowling. CG's average of 44+ would be worth 55-60 today. Sehwag's 50+ should be close to 60 by now, but it's not for the reason stated previously. CG was a great player of spin; Sehwag wants to knock the cover off the ball from ball one. Similar attacking styles, but CG possessed a far better defensive technique. Your complete Test batsman. For me it's CG hands down, no question in my mind. BTW, WI 4-prong of yesteryear would've relish bowling at Sehwag who doesn't like it in the shoulder area.

  • on September 17, 2012, 16:02 GMT

    did anyone remember him hitting kapil dev for 30 runs in an over in sharjah in the80's. i think 3 x4 followed by 3x6. also forget about the onelegged history that's reserved for him only. these guys today get injured without even playing so there is no comparison there.

  • AsherCA on September 17, 2012, 15:07 GMT

    Greenidge Vs Sehwag is bad comparison for multiple reasons - 1. They played in different era's. Yes Greenidge maintained a higher average over 108 tests but his tests were spread over a longer period, allowing him to recover / rectify any gaps in his batting Vs Sehwag who plays more regularly, allowing bowlers to exploit those gaps. 2. Greenidge played his local games against the likes of Marshall, Garner, Holding .... for him, facing Lillee, Thompson, Imran & Willis would have been at par, most others would have been a step downwards. Sehwag plays Praveen Kumar / Zaheer Khan in his local games & then, has to play Dale Steyn & Morne Morkel in tests...see the difference between practice & tests ? 3. Greenidge played in an era where all cricketers were free - Sehwag plays when showing your bat to an umpire to indicate that you played the ball can have you penalised for dissent, but hitting an opponent with a Cricket bat OR abusing the umpires by snatching the ball from them is OK

  • Paulk on September 17, 2012, 12:46 GMT

    People like Greenidge were what made the WI such a legendary team. Even if you factor out Viv Richards, batsmen like Greenidge, Lloyd and Kallicharan were outstanding who could turn a Test match off their own bat - matchwinners !! And then you had very fine batsmen in Gomes and Haynes who could hold their own in such company.

  • cloudmess on September 17, 2012, 12:19 GMT

    I enjoyed this article and found myself agreeing with most of the comments. But I think it's a bit foolish to say that Greenidge was much, much better than someone like Virender Sehwag. Sehwag has gone a little off the boil in the past year, but before then made big runs against terrific bowlers in testing conditions and with the pressure on. Even if batting is easier in the 2000s than 1980s, Sehwag averages 50 to Greenidge's 44. And Greenidge never had to face the likes of Marshall, Garner, Holding, Roberts, Croft, Ambrose etc etc!!

  • harshthakor on September 17, 2012, 7:57 GMT

    In the 1980's arguably at times Gordon Greenidge even nosed out Viv Richards.In 1984 he was arguably the best batsman in the world when he scored 2 match-winning double centuries in Engalnd.At his best reminded you of Barry Richards.Amongst the top 10 one day International batsman of all time and arguably amongst the top 6 test match opening batsman of all.He combined solid technique with a penchant for tearing the heart out of bowling attacks.No west Indian batsman arguably ever hit the ball harder.Greenidge literally tore the top of the cricket ball.A certainty in the top 100 cricketers of all and i would place him in the 3rd all time cricket 11 of all time.

  • on September 17, 2012, 5:52 GMT

    Next to the late Conrad Hunte, CG Greenidge is my favorite WI opener. He was your classic professional cricketer who used to take excellent care of his gear and carried himself in similar fashion. He did everything by the proverbial book and seldom veered off course. It was after a day's play against India at Kensington Oval in '83 when he came out to knock up. I was standing nearby and asked if he wanted me to bowl a few at him until his bowler arrived. He replied in the negative and that was that for me. Guess he thought my leggies would put him out of form! He was a savage batsman and superb slip. The square cut and hook were his signature shots. He drove well too.Excellent player of spin. Legend has it then that if he came out to open walking with a limp, bowlers should beware. Greenidge's opening partnerships with fellow Bajan Des Haynes were usually a sight to behold, probably the best of all time.

  • on September 17, 2012, 5:41 GMT

    As a 10 year old I watched his double hundred at Lords to humiliate England; his approach to that innings encapsulated the West Indian attitude towards Test cricket. It was an absolute privilege to be able to see him play in the years that followed.

  • Alexk400 on September 19, 2012, 0:01 GMT

    Sehwag at his prime better than CG but now a days sehwag becoming Shaid afridi.. HIT or MISS on everything

  • on September 17, 2012, 23:40 GMT

    He was destructive aggressiveness personified and when he hit it (hard) it stayed hit. After he had retired from the first class game the last time I saw him play was for Lashings CC an invitational XI for ex-test match players and in that match he hit one of the longest and highest straight sixes I've ever seen..at the age of 56!!! He deserves his place amongst the finest ever in his position as 92 first class centuries suggests. There may be current openers with better averages but he is right up there with the best - his overall record more than stacks up against the contemporaries of his time but his defining innings has to be the murderous and brutal 214 * at Lords in 1984.. another knock I was privileged to see. It was and has to remain arguably the greatest individual fourth innings effort by ANY batsman to win ANY game as some of his 29 fours that day were among IMO the most savage and powerful boundaries ever hit.

  • on September 17, 2012, 18:36 GMT

    Sehwag Vs Greenidge? Don't make me laugh. If you saw both of them live, up close & personal as the saying goes, and you know even a little about batsmanship, you will plump for CG, the consummate professional. Sehwag's a swashbuckler who more often than not, gifts his wicket. CG never did that. Sehwag plays a lot more cricket and against more mediocre teams than CG and will wind up surpassing CG's 108 Tests soon. As such, has lots more opportunities to gorge himself on second-rate bowling. CG's average of 44+ would be worth 55-60 today. Sehwag's 50+ should be close to 60 by now, but it's not for the reason stated previously. CG was a great player of spin; Sehwag wants to knock the cover off the ball from ball one. Similar attacking styles, but CG possessed a far better defensive technique. Your complete Test batsman. For me it's CG hands down, no question in my mind. BTW, WI 4-prong of yesteryear would've relish bowling at Sehwag who doesn't like it in the shoulder area.

  • on September 17, 2012, 16:02 GMT

    did anyone remember him hitting kapil dev for 30 runs in an over in sharjah in the80's. i think 3 x4 followed by 3x6. also forget about the onelegged history that's reserved for him only. these guys today get injured without even playing so there is no comparison there.

  • AsherCA on September 17, 2012, 15:07 GMT

    Greenidge Vs Sehwag is bad comparison for multiple reasons - 1. They played in different era's. Yes Greenidge maintained a higher average over 108 tests but his tests were spread over a longer period, allowing him to recover / rectify any gaps in his batting Vs Sehwag who plays more regularly, allowing bowlers to exploit those gaps. 2. Greenidge played his local games against the likes of Marshall, Garner, Holding .... for him, facing Lillee, Thompson, Imran & Willis would have been at par, most others would have been a step downwards. Sehwag plays Praveen Kumar / Zaheer Khan in his local games & then, has to play Dale Steyn & Morne Morkel in tests...see the difference between practice & tests ? 3. Greenidge played in an era where all cricketers were free - Sehwag plays when showing your bat to an umpire to indicate that you played the ball can have you penalised for dissent, but hitting an opponent with a Cricket bat OR abusing the umpires by snatching the ball from them is OK

  • Paulk on September 17, 2012, 12:46 GMT

    People like Greenidge were what made the WI such a legendary team. Even if you factor out Viv Richards, batsmen like Greenidge, Lloyd and Kallicharan were outstanding who could turn a Test match off their own bat - matchwinners !! And then you had very fine batsmen in Gomes and Haynes who could hold their own in such company.

  • cloudmess on September 17, 2012, 12:19 GMT

    I enjoyed this article and found myself agreeing with most of the comments. But I think it's a bit foolish to say that Greenidge was much, much better than someone like Virender Sehwag. Sehwag has gone a little off the boil in the past year, but before then made big runs against terrific bowlers in testing conditions and with the pressure on. Even if batting is easier in the 2000s than 1980s, Sehwag averages 50 to Greenidge's 44. And Greenidge never had to face the likes of Marshall, Garner, Holding, Roberts, Croft, Ambrose etc etc!!

  • harshthakor on September 17, 2012, 7:57 GMT

    In the 1980's arguably at times Gordon Greenidge even nosed out Viv Richards.In 1984 he was arguably the best batsman in the world when he scored 2 match-winning double centuries in Engalnd.At his best reminded you of Barry Richards.Amongst the top 10 one day International batsman of all time and arguably amongst the top 6 test match opening batsman of all.He combined solid technique with a penchant for tearing the heart out of bowling attacks.No west Indian batsman arguably ever hit the ball harder.Greenidge literally tore the top of the cricket ball.A certainty in the top 100 cricketers of all and i would place him in the 3rd all time cricket 11 of all time.

  • on September 17, 2012, 5:52 GMT

    Next to the late Conrad Hunte, CG Greenidge is my favorite WI opener. He was your classic professional cricketer who used to take excellent care of his gear and carried himself in similar fashion. He did everything by the proverbial book and seldom veered off course. It was after a day's play against India at Kensington Oval in '83 when he came out to knock up. I was standing nearby and asked if he wanted me to bowl a few at him until his bowler arrived. He replied in the negative and that was that for me. Guess he thought my leggies would put him out of form! He was a savage batsman and superb slip. The square cut and hook were his signature shots. He drove well too.Excellent player of spin. Legend has it then that if he came out to open walking with a limp, bowlers should beware. Greenidge's opening partnerships with fellow Bajan Des Haynes were usually a sight to behold, probably the best of all time.

  • on September 17, 2012, 5:41 GMT

    As a 10 year old I watched his double hundred at Lords to humiliate England; his approach to that innings encapsulated the West Indian attitude towards Test cricket. It was an absolute privilege to be able to see him play in the years that followed.

  • on September 17, 2012, 2:52 GMT

    I have been privileged to watch Test cricket since 1953 and of all the great openers during this time none can surpass my good friend and former neighbour Gordon Greenidge. The partnership which he formed with Desmond Haynes is in my humble opinion the greatest ever. Thanks for the enduring memories Gordon and may you continue to enjoy good health and happiness.

  • Number_5 on September 17, 2012, 1:40 GMT

    GG and DH ensured i endured many a disappointing summer in Aus growing up. The WI were at their peak and these guys formed (IMO) one of the greatest opening partnerships the game has seen. Great article, id love to hear more about this wonderful players career.

  • LillianThomson on September 17, 2012, 0:48 GMT

    @Muski, it doesn't matter that Sehwag has faced vastly inferior bowlers on easier wickets than Greenidge. Even with that huge advantage, Sehwag's fourth innings average in Tests is a mediocre 31.74 after 98 Tests while Greenidge averaged a magnificent 53.19 in the fourth innings across 108 Tests. In other words, when the chips were down, at the time when matches are won or lost, Greenidge was almost twice the batsman that Sehwag was. Even before you factor in that he faced better bowlers on more difficult wickets, and played 1/3 of his career before the introduction of helmets.

  • kentjones on September 17, 2012, 0:25 GMT

    Gordon Greenidge was a supreme professional and played the game as it should be played. If there was a ball to be hit it was and if the ball deserved respect it was. He was a superlative player that was a key element in the champion WI team. One of my favourite cricketers.

  • on September 16, 2012, 22:43 GMT

    I was fortunate enough to watch him bat in several matches and on those occasions he got big runs every time including a double hundred for Hampshire in the late 70s against Somerset at the then 'old' county ground at Taunton. He was particularly savage that day; anything loose was mercilessly punished using a languid, relaxed, (yet extremely intimidating) stance at the crease that IMHO has never been fully recaptured by any opening batsman before or since. I also remember in one of the early World Cups a nonchalant flick off his legs that went for six; again a shot/technique that hasn't been repeated for sheer dismissiveness and disdain for the bowling by anyone else in/from any era. At his best he was simply awesome to watch and I rate him one of the greatest test openers of ALL time. He also had a decent ODI record finishing with an average (45.03) that not many present modern day players have either matched or bettered.

  • Venkatb on September 16, 2012, 19:13 GMT

    When WI toured India in 74-75, Greenidge was the better known batsman, not Viv Richards who was essentially an understudy for Rowe - he had scored 273 out of 400 in a match against the Pakistanis in England (his side still lost though!) - India was coming off its worst tour of England (repeated since in 2011) but was considered good enough to hold its won against the WI that had essentially only 2 players (Gibbs and Lloyd) with prior India experience, and Andy Roberts was a promising fast bowler. I followed each match on that tour, including watching the match against South Zone when Lloyd and Greenidge were in a murderous mood in the 2nd innings and then in Madras when Roberts was at his best. Greenidge could hold his own as one of the best openers in the world at a time when Boycott, Gavaskar and Barry Richards were around - while these 3 could be contained, no fielder dared to stand close enough when Greenidge was at the crease!

  • on September 16, 2012, 18:59 GMT

    GG is one of the BEST and complete batsmen i ever saw .

  • makeshift on September 16, 2012, 17:05 GMT

    He played the square so well. It was a joy to watch him. He & Desmond Haynes made look cricket easy

    And then came one down the King Viv. Wow that was something

    I could watch them all day

    Thanks Gordon for the good times

  • praveen4honestremark on September 16, 2012, 16:57 GMT

    One of the most feared opening Batsman when WI dominated the cricket. Short guy but never was short in response to score runs.

  • on September 16, 2012, 15:05 GMT

    gordon was one of my fav wi, in his debut series in india ,in a tour match vs sz at hydbad, before blore test,both teams were at full strength, sz had venkat,pras,chandra,abid ali,vijay kumar,vish. wi had gordon,rowe,llyod,kalli,viv was rested. the match was petering to a draw,people started mooving out,when venkat declared, one dayers were just going to be introduced,andall the wi were famous in eng countys,175 runs were set in some 30 overs, grenidge n llyod opened the first ball from abid ali was hit so straight like a tracer bullet that the noisy crowd suddenly became silent, wow we then enjoyed the hitting from both....there is a joke that vijaykumar who opened the bowling from the other end went to the umpire n showed him that the ball only after 8balls as gone out of shape then abid in is urudhu style informed ,dont bother keep bowling it will come back to shape..this was the murderous power which i saw for the first time,i heard, n as grenidge says it was oiled bats....

  • Chris_P on September 16, 2012, 14:49 GMT

    I watched that series in 1975/76 & this was when Thompson was at his most ferocious. He was far too quick for all batsmen. His shoulder injury the following season effectively ended that intimidation factor for he never approached the same speeds (consistently) again.

  • on September 16, 2012, 14:43 GMT

    Meeting him in Nairobi and having dinner with him is the best moment of my life. I always Thank GOD for making this happen.

  • muski on September 16, 2012, 14:31 GMT

    @Zahidsaltin- I have followed Greenidge's career from 1978. He and Haynes were a deadly combination. However to belittle Sehwag or Amla while comparing to them is not correct. Is it Sehwag's fault that there are no quality fast bowlers in the world today?If that is so, its useless to have statistics in cricket. How would you then compare then 10K runs of Original litte master to current GOD of cricket.? Would you call it priceless considering the fact that Sachin never got to play that quality of fast bowling and that too in the pre helmet era. Comparisons of different eras dont work my friend.

  • Bobby_Talyarkhan on September 16, 2012, 13:18 GMT

    Greenidge was always my favourite west indian batter. There was something about his horizontal bat shots - the square cut and the pull - which exercised a magnetic attraction upon me. I used to try and play the square cut like him in my school cricket matches and it was always so satisfying when it came off - I never had the courage to play the hook shot like he did! He was, as many people have noted, one half of a great opening partnership - with Desmond Haynes. Someone else noted his partnership with Roy Fredricks - another great batsman. But there was also his opening partnership for Hampshire with Barry Richards - believe me that was out of this world! Greenidge and (Barry) Richards batting together - we will never see their like again! And as the other great Richards, Viv, said to Gordon when he was worried about his form - "Gordon - form is temporary, class is permanent"! Hallelujah!

  • on September 16, 2012, 13:18 GMT

    Great to hear from Gordon. Still remember the first time I saw him in Guyana in the mid 70's. He only made 40 odd in a rain affected match but his savage square cuts have stayed with me all these years. He was probably the best player of short-pitched fast bowling in his era and one of the hardest hitters of the ball. He would cut and hook the ball with abandon and immense power. Gordon was truly one of the greats and a major pillar in the great WI teams of that period.

  • JBerger on September 16, 2012, 13:10 GMT

    Those youngster who think Haydos had an imposing presence! I wish if they had seen Gordo batting. On most days he was not any less destructive than the King-Viv.

    In my honest opinion, any of the so called greats from the new era are not even half the batsman these amazing guys were.

    I totally agree with Rienzie Delilkan, Desmo & Gordo were definitely all time great opening pair when it comes to destruction of the opposition bowlers. Keep in mind we just don't have the quality bowler like the ones back in the days. I really wanted to see how all these so called greats of the new times would have fared against the bowlers of the past.

  • Hardy1 on September 16, 2012, 13:03 GMT

    Anyone notice something apart from Greenidge scoring 93 run out and 107 on his debut in that Test? It also happened to be the debut of one Vivian Richards who scored 3 & 4! Is it just me or does it seem as if cricket's missing the calibre of the great players that were around in the 80s & 90s (& even until the recent retirement of much of the great Australian team)?

  • gandhala on September 16, 2012, 12:57 GMT

    I still remember these 2 guys never gets out against india.Great players.In his debut match score board, How is that Boyce the 4th bowler was able to bowl an over within 8 mins and get rid of Gavasakar . Something strange with the score board i guess.

  • thebeardedblunder on September 16, 2012, 12:40 GMT

    Gordon you was not just a great player but an inspiration to me when I read how you received cruel racial taunts, yet rising above them as a boy after moving to England. And how lovely to hear how that great doyen of radio commentary John Arlott was your idol-just mere mention of his name fills my heart with nostalgic joy! Talking of radio commentary (but unrelated to this topic) does anybody know why dear old CMJ has disappeared from the airwaves? I do hope he's ok.

  • Natx on September 16, 2012, 12:36 GMT

    What distinguished these great players from the rest of the world was their ability to mentally and physically challenge the best of the bowlers at their prime. After Gordon, Des, Viv, I didn't see a complete player of that mindset and caliber. Shades of that ability were seen on Matt Hayden, Adam Gilchrist, Shewag but none of them were against supreme bowling at better bowler friendly pitches (pace, swing, spin respectively). Gilly special against the two W's was probably the closest but that was in Hobart so I wouldn't rate that highly. Haydos challenge of Harbhajan & other spinners in 2001/02 series was touch better in terms of class and contribution. Of the players in the recent history, only Kevin Pietersen had that ability to dominate the best as was amply demonstrated against Steyn, Morkel and Philander in the recent series, but I'm afraid his attitude is costing his career, so we probably won't see that many. Ross Taylor has that mindset but he lacks consistency.

  • Yagga175 on September 16, 2012, 12:05 GMT

    I remember 1976 in England when he hit 134 (out of 211) and 101 at Old Trafford and followed up with 115 in the next test at Headingley when WI scored 437 in a single day. He tore the England attack to pieces and, had Viv not had made 829 runs in the series it would have been Gordon's summer. A ferocious hooker and cutter and no mean on driver either. It remains a mystery to me how he failed so spectacularly in Australia in 75/76 - one would have thought that he had the game for those wickets (although he wasn't alone in underperforming on that tour). One shoudln't forget that he was also a pivotal member of the WI slips cordon and stood out in a team of brilliant fielders. However good his 1976 tour was the two doubles in 1984 against England, including that memorable 214* at Lord's, were even better and his batting much more mature. His defence had tightened and he was impregnable. Didn't lose too much in comparison with Barry Richards at Hampshire either!

  • Zahidsaltin on September 16, 2012, 9:46 GMT

    Those who hav'nt watched them, and those who do not know the differece of bowling attacks and wickets in that era to today, would still think Sehwag and Amla are better players but believe me they aren't half the players, Hayes and Gordon were.

  • Zahidsaltin on September 16, 2012, 9:42 GMT

    @Ashik Sali, Why on earth would you miss Roberts and Croft?

  • Zahidsaltin on September 16, 2012, 9:40 GMT

    Gordon and Hayes, oh really I miss the scene of them batting as much as I miss to see Imran and Sarfraz bowling to them.

  • on September 16, 2012, 8:43 GMT

    Miss these great players.India used to go into celebration when Gordon,Viv or Clive got out .Can still remmber after all these 35 years.Post world cup 83 Viv and greenidge pulverised the Indian bowling in a one day in Jamshedpur when WI posted 353 a score not associated with ODIs in those days.Fearsome,classy and entertaining.Where have the great cricketers gone,not just the windies,there is none of that calibre in whole world today.

  • Punter_28 on September 16, 2012, 8:27 GMT

    Greenidge was awesome. In terms of talent , he was no lesser mortal than Sir. Viv. Who can forget that 214 n.o. when he pulverized the English attack consisting of Willis, Botham, Pringle, Foster & Miller on the 5th day at Lord's in less than 5 hours? His original opening partner Fredricks was also equally great.

  • Chris_P on September 16, 2012, 8:17 GMT

    Looking into his first test scorecard, the remarkable effort of scoring 93 (run out) & 107 was a great effort in a debut test & in India as well. The 2nd innings effort of Clive Lloyd was probably even better, that was an incredible strike rate on a turning & slow pitch. The birth of the upcoming super team was starting. And let's not forget this Indian team was the #1 ranked team for 15 months up to June that year, so the die wast already cast for what was to follow. Only the powerful fast bowling onslaught was yet to come.

  • on September 16, 2012, 6:32 GMT

    Still remember Greendige, Haynes, Gomes, Lloyd, Richards, Logie, Dujon, Marshall, Holding, Garner, Harper - terrific players. Those were the times I started watching cricket and am a huge supporter of WI.

  • landl47 on September 16, 2012, 5:34 GMT

    Great player, and lucky enough to open the batting with two other great players- Haynes for the WI and Barry Richards for Hampshire. Both those two opening partnerships must go down as among the best ever.

  • bharath74 on September 16, 2012, 5:20 GMT

    I guess D Haynes and Gordon were the best opening pair in the world since i have been watching cricket.

  • on September 16, 2012, 4:57 GMT

    And his flick six hits off his hips was one of his signature shots.. I still rate the Greenidge - Haynes opening partnership is the greatest of all time in test and ODIs..

  • LillianThomson on September 16, 2012, 4:40 GMT

    Greenidge and Haynes was the best opening partnership I have ever seen, equally capable on all types of wickets. The thing about Greenidge which is astonishing is how - like Clive Lloyd and Desmond Haynes but not Viv Richards - his standards were as high at the end of his career (when he hit a double century v Australia) as they were at his peak. Many great batsmen like Viv Richards, Allan Border and Sachin Tendulkar have been hugely diminished figures late in their careers. Even Kallis is not the batsman he used to be. But Greenidge and Haynes were actually harder to get out the older they got.

  • mattblacknaki on September 16, 2012, 3:58 GMT

    Well, he scored a century in the second innings of his first test. BUT he score 93 in the first innings! He also played the sweep shot correctly against spinners. Not the paddle sweep of alan Knott and others but the perfect seep like Tiger Pataudi used to play.

  • urprashant on September 16, 2012, 3:32 GMT

    The Big Question is where all the talents from West Indies cricket gone. I don't think Cricket board of that era was better and they did something special to unearth those extraordinary talents. Have people of West Indies really stopped playing cricket! Also I don't think these former great players are doing anything to find and develop new talents. I see Michael Holding spends almost his entire year in England doing commentary for England team and even county cricket and always looking forward to criticize cricket board of West Indies!!

  • Biggus on September 16, 2012, 3:22 GMT

    Quite probably the most brutal square-cutter I've seen. Crack! And the ball would bounce 20 meters back into play. Glad to hear he's still kicking around, and interesting to hear of his great esteem for John Arlott.

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  • Biggus on September 16, 2012, 3:22 GMT

    Quite probably the most brutal square-cutter I've seen. Crack! And the ball would bounce 20 meters back into play. Glad to hear he's still kicking around, and interesting to hear of his great esteem for John Arlott.

  • urprashant on September 16, 2012, 3:32 GMT

    The Big Question is where all the talents from West Indies cricket gone. I don't think Cricket board of that era was better and they did something special to unearth those extraordinary talents. Have people of West Indies really stopped playing cricket! Also I don't think these former great players are doing anything to find and develop new talents. I see Michael Holding spends almost his entire year in England doing commentary for England team and even county cricket and always looking forward to criticize cricket board of West Indies!!

  • mattblacknaki on September 16, 2012, 3:58 GMT

    Well, he scored a century in the second innings of his first test. BUT he score 93 in the first innings! He also played the sweep shot correctly against spinners. Not the paddle sweep of alan Knott and others but the perfect seep like Tiger Pataudi used to play.

  • LillianThomson on September 16, 2012, 4:40 GMT

    Greenidge and Haynes was the best opening partnership I have ever seen, equally capable on all types of wickets. The thing about Greenidge which is astonishing is how - like Clive Lloyd and Desmond Haynes but not Viv Richards - his standards were as high at the end of his career (when he hit a double century v Australia) as they were at his peak. Many great batsmen like Viv Richards, Allan Border and Sachin Tendulkar have been hugely diminished figures late in their careers. Even Kallis is not the batsman he used to be. But Greenidge and Haynes were actually harder to get out the older they got.

  • on September 16, 2012, 4:57 GMT

    And his flick six hits off his hips was one of his signature shots.. I still rate the Greenidge - Haynes opening partnership is the greatest of all time in test and ODIs..

  • bharath74 on September 16, 2012, 5:20 GMT

    I guess D Haynes and Gordon were the best opening pair in the world since i have been watching cricket.

  • landl47 on September 16, 2012, 5:34 GMT

    Great player, and lucky enough to open the batting with two other great players- Haynes for the WI and Barry Richards for Hampshire. Both those two opening partnerships must go down as among the best ever.

  • on September 16, 2012, 6:32 GMT

    Still remember Greendige, Haynes, Gomes, Lloyd, Richards, Logie, Dujon, Marshall, Holding, Garner, Harper - terrific players. Those were the times I started watching cricket and am a huge supporter of WI.

  • Chris_P on September 16, 2012, 8:17 GMT

    Looking into his first test scorecard, the remarkable effort of scoring 93 (run out) & 107 was a great effort in a debut test & in India as well. The 2nd innings effort of Clive Lloyd was probably even better, that was an incredible strike rate on a turning & slow pitch. The birth of the upcoming super team was starting. And let's not forget this Indian team was the #1 ranked team for 15 months up to June that year, so the die wast already cast for what was to follow. Only the powerful fast bowling onslaught was yet to come.

  • Punter_28 on September 16, 2012, 8:27 GMT

    Greenidge was awesome. In terms of talent , he was no lesser mortal than Sir. Viv. Who can forget that 214 n.o. when he pulverized the English attack consisting of Willis, Botham, Pringle, Foster & Miller on the 5th day at Lord's in less than 5 hours? His original opening partner Fredricks was also equally great.