England v Australia, 5th Investec Test, The Oval August 21, 2013

Lehmann fires, but misses the point

Instead of trying to rattle the England players, Australia's coach should focus on the issues in his own team
73

Cheating is okay, just not if it's too blatant. That, essentially, is the crux of Darren Lehmann's argument. Actually, calling it an argument is too generous, for it implies a measure of reason. Posturing, that's what it was. Using a blokey interview on a blokey Australian radio station to appeal to Aussie blokes. Let's all have a laugh and call them cheating Poms. Let's get stuck into Stuart Broad when England come to Australia. Sledge him from the stands, fellas.

It is hard to imagine that Lehmann would have called Broad a cheat had he been in a press conference full of English reporters. But Triple M is a radio station that has a way of making sportsmen feel they're among mates. It was on Triple M that Matthew Hayden called Harbhajan Singh a "little obnoxious weed" in 2008, and it was on Triple M that Andrew Symonds referred to Brendon McCullum as "a lump of shit" in 2009.

Both men faced Cricket Australia disciplinary action for "detrimental public comment"; Hayden was reprimanded, Symonds fined $4000. Cricket Australia has no choice but to report Lehmann for a Code of Conduct breach, for calling an opponent a cheat is nothing if not detrimental. It is also ridiculous. "That was just blatant cheating," Lehmann said of Broad's failure to walk at Trent Bridge. "I don't advocate walking but when you hit it to first slip it's pretty hard."

So on the one hand, Lehmann doesn't generally believe players should walk. But on the other, he calls Broad a cheat for... not walking? Broad knew he edged that delivery off Ashton Agar. But Brad Haddin knew he tickled behind off James Anderson later in the same match. It took an England review to have that match-winning decision given. David Warner knew he edged when he hooked at Broad in Manchester and England's review failed as Hot Spot did not show evidence.

Ah, but Broad's cheating was blatant. Cheat a bit more convincingly and that's acceptable in Lehmann's world. Of course, none of these men are cheats, for players are under no obligation to walk. Not to mention that Broad's edge, while thick, was not to slip - it deflected there off Haddin's gloves. Double standards aside, perhaps Lehmann thought that it would be good to get inside the heads of the England players. Shake things up a bit.

"Certainly our players haven't forgotten, they're calling him everything under the sun as they go past," Lehmann said. And how has that worked out, Boof? A match-winning 11-wicket haul at Chester-le-Street? A better series batting average after the fourth Test than Shane Watson, Phillip Hughes, Usman Khawaja, Steven Smith, Haddin or Ed Cowan? Yes, Broad is clearly shaken by all those stinging remarks.

Perhaps instead of trying to rattle the England players, Lehmann should ensure his own players don't feel flustered. At 0-3 down in an Ashes series, with another one on the horizon, that has to be his focus. How, exactly, are young batsmen like Hughes and Khawaja supposed to feel comfortable at the crease when they fear for their place? Lehmann is one of the selectors responsible for changing the batting order in every Test on this tour.

What must Hughes, Khawaja and Cowan think now that a bowling allrounder has been picked at No. 7? How must the players have felt when the coach said after the loss in Chester-le-Street - where Australia had been very competitive, mind you - that careers would be on the line at The Oval? Can you imagine a respected mentor like Andy Flower or Gary Kirsten making such statements? Can you imagine them calling an opponent a cheat for not walking?

From the surprise selection of Ashton Agar from outside the official squad in the first Test to the constant shuffling of the batting order to the inclusion of James Faulkner at The Oval to the comments on Broad, Lehmann has tried to keep England on the hop throughout this series, tried to keep them guessing. He needs to forget that and worry about his own men, give them some self-belief instead of misguidedly attempting to shake the confidence of the England players.

"If they don't learn we will find blokes that will," Lehmann said of his players after the fourth Test. It is to be hoped Lehmann, on his first tour as an international coach, learns from his mistakes as well.

Brydon Coverdale is an assistant editor at ESPNcricinfo. He tweets here

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • cdublew on August 21, 2013, 23:22 GMT

    Great article Mr Coverdale - you have clarified Lehman's irresponsible comments in calling Broad a CHEAT very well indeed. A Coach is a member of the Management team of Australian cricket and he should distance himself from name calling and inciting crowd behaviour against visiting teams. It is my opinion that the ACB should come out and reprimand Lehman for this highly unacceptable behaviour in order to confirm that they a party to such idle talk. Where is Mr Sutherland !

  • Reggaecricket on August 23, 2013, 11:01 GMT

    So far all Lehmann has done is say the wrong things! First, he comes under fire from no less than Steve Waugh, for threatening to end player's careers if they don;t perform, now this. Remembering the incidents that got him reprimanded during his playing days, don't make it surprising that he would say stuff unbecoming of a coach of a touring side.

  • on August 23, 2013, 4:43 GMT

    Agreed 100% Brydon. Mickey Arthur, whatever faults he might have had, instilled confidence in the players I felt. Ever since Lehmann has been installed as a selector, we have been continually frustrated by the pernicious chopping and changing of the batting order. I hope Hughes and Khawaja are given another chance soon.

  • Nerk on August 22, 2013, 21:10 GMT

    Australia are poor losers, as shown by Lehmann's comments here. England are poor winners, as shown by their slowing of the over rate and defensive tactics.

  • on August 22, 2013, 13:52 GMT

    Stuart Broad does himself no favours. He is petulant, appeals his batting decisions almost without fail and doesn't walk when he should. Having said all that, he is still more hones than most Aussie batsmen.

  • on August 22, 2013, 11:47 GMT

    If England were down 3-0 and lets say it had been Smith who was in Broad's position we know for sure that the English fans , press and members of the team ( possibly including both captain and coach ) would have been carrying on in the same vein as Lehmann is now. You know that it would happen.. after all its human nature. My concern as an educator is the impact that Broad's "confession" has on those youngsters e.g. schoolboy cricketers for example who admire him as hero and role model.

  • pbehr on August 22, 2013, 11:13 GMT

    Broad's comments gave Lehman the perfect excuse to fuel the fire, and now the media attention is further fanning those flames. The point Darren was (poorly) trying to make, is that after a long time to reflect, Stuart commented publicly, with pride, about his decision not to walk. That gets any opposition's back up. Pressure and intimidation are vital factors in The Ashes, and the crowds play a huge role. England crowds win hands down since the Barmy Army, but now the wounded, large Aussie crowd have their own pantomime villain, gifted courtesy of Stuart's comments. As Ponting faced in England and Warner faces for the rest of his career. Be unsportsmanlike and you suffer the consequences. And now the added attention will make it a memorable career highlight, like Trevor Chappell's underarm, and Maradona's hand of god. So unfortunately Stuart's got a tough tour ahead. It may work in his favour, who knows. But I'm certain it would have all blown over if he'd been more humble.

  • PutMarshyOn on August 22, 2013, 10:36 GMT

    And I hope the ACB climb into Lehman for an irresponsible and unprofessional lack of tact. His were the comments of a man under pressure but that doesn't excuse out and out hypocrisy. Asking the crowd to get into a player is just inexcusable. John Snow 1970/71, Alderman early 80's both got injured by crowd members in Australia. Stupid, stupid, stupid. In my book he'll be lucky to survive this.

  • Samdanh on August 22, 2013, 7:52 GMT

    I am waiting for India fans' reactions when India is at the receiving end of such a decision like Aleem Dar's and such a behaviour like Broad's in the near future-with a lot of overseas tours coming up. Stay tuned

  • Sumeet.Gupta on August 22, 2013, 7:50 GMT

    I remember during the infamous 2008 series between India and Australia. Clarke absolutely smashed the ball to first slip off Kumble (or Bhajji?) and waited for the umpire to give him the marching orders. He later said that he was not waiting for ump's decision but was disappointed with his shot and standing there. The most laughable excuse you will hear!!

  • cdublew on August 21, 2013, 23:22 GMT

    Great article Mr Coverdale - you have clarified Lehman's irresponsible comments in calling Broad a CHEAT very well indeed. A Coach is a member of the Management team of Australian cricket and he should distance himself from name calling and inciting crowd behaviour against visiting teams. It is my opinion that the ACB should come out and reprimand Lehman for this highly unacceptable behaviour in order to confirm that they a party to such idle talk. Where is Mr Sutherland !

  • Reggaecricket on August 23, 2013, 11:01 GMT

    So far all Lehmann has done is say the wrong things! First, he comes under fire from no less than Steve Waugh, for threatening to end player's careers if they don;t perform, now this. Remembering the incidents that got him reprimanded during his playing days, don't make it surprising that he would say stuff unbecoming of a coach of a touring side.

  • on August 23, 2013, 4:43 GMT

    Agreed 100% Brydon. Mickey Arthur, whatever faults he might have had, instilled confidence in the players I felt. Ever since Lehmann has been installed as a selector, we have been continually frustrated by the pernicious chopping and changing of the batting order. I hope Hughes and Khawaja are given another chance soon.

  • Nerk on August 22, 2013, 21:10 GMT

    Australia are poor losers, as shown by Lehmann's comments here. England are poor winners, as shown by their slowing of the over rate and defensive tactics.

  • on August 22, 2013, 13:52 GMT

    Stuart Broad does himself no favours. He is petulant, appeals his batting decisions almost without fail and doesn't walk when he should. Having said all that, he is still more hones than most Aussie batsmen.

  • on August 22, 2013, 11:47 GMT

    If England were down 3-0 and lets say it had been Smith who was in Broad's position we know for sure that the English fans , press and members of the team ( possibly including both captain and coach ) would have been carrying on in the same vein as Lehmann is now. You know that it would happen.. after all its human nature. My concern as an educator is the impact that Broad's "confession" has on those youngsters e.g. schoolboy cricketers for example who admire him as hero and role model.

  • pbehr on August 22, 2013, 11:13 GMT

    Broad's comments gave Lehman the perfect excuse to fuel the fire, and now the media attention is further fanning those flames. The point Darren was (poorly) trying to make, is that after a long time to reflect, Stuart commented publicly, with pride, about his decision not to walk. That gets any opposition's back up. Pressure and intimidation are vital factors in The Ashes, and the crowds play a huge role. England crowds win hands down since the Barmy Army, but now the wounded, large Aussie crowd have their own pantomime villain, gifted courtesy of Stuart's comments. As Ponting faced in England and Warner faces for the rest of his career. Be unsportsmanlike and you suffer the consequences. And now the added attention will make it a memorable career highlight, like Trevor Chappell's underarm, and Maradona's hand of god. So unfortunately Stuart's got a tough tour ahead. It may work in his favour, who knows. But I'm certain it would have all blown over if he'd been more humble.

  • PutMarshyOn on August 22, 2013, 10:36 GMT

    And I hope the ACB climb into Lehman for an irresponsible and unprofessional lack of tact. His were the comments of a man under pressure but that doesn't excuse out and out hypocrisy. Asking the crowd to get into a player is just inexcusable. John Snow 1970/71, Alderman early 80's both got injured by crowd members in Australia. Stupid, stupid, stupid. In my book he'll be lucky to survive this.

  • Samdanh on August 22, 2013, 7:52 GMT

    I am waiting for India fans' reactions when India is at the receiving end of such a decision like Aleem Dar's and such a behaviour like Broad's in the near future-with a lot of overseas tours coming up. Stay tuned

  • Sumeet.Gupta on August 22, 2013, 7:50 GMT

    I remember during the infamous 2008 series between India and Australia. Clarke absolutely smashed the ball to first slip off Kumble (or Bhajji?) and waited for the umpire to give him the marching orders. He later said that he was not waiting for ump's decision but was disappointed with his shot and standing there. The most laughable excuse you will hear!!

  • RSairam on August 22, 2013, 7:34 GMT

    Oh Bryan, please stop grouping Andy Flower and Gary Kirsten !! Andy is the only coach who repeatedly pleads taking back dismissals (like Ian Bell incident when he was blatantly out) in the name of sporting spirit. He does all unprofessional things unlike Gary

  • Longmemory on August 22, 2013, 7:20 GMT

    What a typically Australian whinge! When we nick it and don't walk, its playing tough but fair. When others nick it and don't walk, its cheating. Darren Lehman is symptomatic of too much of Aussie cricketing culture. He's already proven himself no tactician (dropping Nathan Lyons for the first two tests and playing Agar, for instance) and is now proving himself bereft of common sense as well.

  • on August 22, 2013, 7:18 GMT

    @Front-foot sponge: Interesting point. I don't think it can be called as cheating if you don't walk; even if its bowled. Until the umpire gives you out, you not entitled to bat as long as you want. Rather than "cheating", it is more of stupidity if you stay your ground when you know the umpire ( or third umpire ) will surely find it out and make you go away. You are just making yourself look like a fool. Broad to his credit took the chance being laughed at and made to look like a fool. He got away with that and won the match for England. I would call that guts.

  • on August 22, 2013, 6:26 GMT

    This is a pure and simple response of a SORE LOOSER. The Australians never knew how to win with honor and now they don't know how to loose with Grace either. Pathetic from Lehman. Fine example he is setting for young lads in Australia.

  • Foddy on August 22, 2013, 5:50 GMT

    Front-Foot-Sponge

    It seems that you either didn't watch the incident in question (apparently like Lehman?) or didn't read the article above. Broad didn't 'hit the cover off it to slip'; he edged the ball to the keeper, and then - via the keeper's gloves - to slip. That's not to say that it wasn't a pretty thick edge, but it's not quite the same. In fact, to give the umpire the benefit of the doubt, I think that he might have thought that the deviation to slip came off the keeper's gloves (having missed the bat), not off the bat first.

    That makes it rather closer to the Haddin and Warner situations.

  • on August 22, 2013, 5:31 GMT

    Lehmann brilliant cricketer???? What nonsense. A mediocre player and an even worse coach

  • on August 22, 2013, 5:14 GMT

    An excellent article. It seems that professionalism has lapsed in some over the players over the past few months and now the coach has followed the lead of some of his players. Agree with an earlier post, DL still has some maturing to do as an international coach.

  • santoshjohnsamuel on August 22, 2013, 5:12 GMT

    As a cricket lover, i'm extremely disappointed that not one of these otherwise excellent writers has called the Board incident shameful. Before Coverdale, it was Sambit, and if i recall correctly both Guardian and Independent said almost the same thing: what Board did was within the laws of the game, not cheating. And i do not endorse Lehmann's take either; most of us would prefer that the batsmen walk, no matter how faint the edge and the match situation, and we would also prefer players not appealing for blatant non-LBWs. And despite the screaming on TV, most of us are on the side of umpires, even if they've erred. And how ironical that we are shown clips of players deliberately bowling no-balls, accompanied by a media frenzy to condemn and ban them for spot fixing and bringing the game to disrepute and yet being fed the nonsense that standing one's ground after a half-foot deflection we saw on TV is not cheating, but professionalism. Would be nice if we remember it's Test cricket.

  • JohnnyRook on August 22, 2013, 4:42 GMT

    That was really hypocritical from Lehmann. There aren't even 10% players who walk after nicking on regular basis. From current Australian setup, there is not even one. So what is he complaining about and it gets worse. He is twisting the facts too. Ball went to slips after two deflections from Haddin.

    @ Front-Foot-Sponge. Watch hightlights of Sydney 2008 against India. You will see Michael Clarke actually nicking one directly to slips and waiting around for umpire to send him back. Isn't it hypocracy that he is Australian captain.....

  • SSon_cric on August 22, 2013, 4:32 GMT

    You are missing the point here, Brydon. There are instances when the player himself is not 100% sure is he has edged it or if he is out LBW. In those cases it is fine to stand your ground. Broad's was a case when he knew 100% that he nicked it. So he should have walked. This is what Lehman means, if you think about it. Completely agree with Lehman here.

  • on August 22, 2013, 3:15 GMT

    Perhaps Lehman doesn't remember Micheal Clarke not walking in Sydney after nicking it to first slip!

  • heathrf1974 on August 22, 2013, 3:06 GMT

    Lehmann needs to focus on the present and to say players cheat by not walking is incorrect. There is no law that say's you have to walk. I don't see other sportsmen helping the umpire/referee to their detriment when the umpire/referee makes an error.

  • on August 22, 2013, 2:37 GMT

    Lehmann's comments are ridiculous, and a bit out of place for him. Ridiculous because in no way is it cheating if you don't walk. Lehmann wasn't a walker himself.

    Out of place because until now Lehmann has been reasonably diplomatic and canny in his public utterances. He generally reserves his sprays for his own players, and gives credit to the opposition where it is due. Plus he knows having a go at the opposition is likely to fire them up, and potentially backfire.

    I can only think that it was said in jest, or as a ploy to get Australian crowds on Broad's case when he tours Australia later this year, in the hope that it will put him off his game.

  • on August 22, 2013, 2:25 GMT

    To me, it is plain disgusting to try to win matches by mind games or sledging, and it is more than disgusting when the spectators are incited to take part in it. If you cannot win it by playing cricket with skill, lose it honourably. Acting otherwise only makes you a poor loser.

  • on August 22, 2013, 2:11 GMT

    @ Nolan Wilde. true, you don't see Andy Flower running to the ICC chucking a hissy at the first bad decision England received on the DRS, do you? You don't see how going straight to the ICC is blatant intimidation of umpires. Lehmann was stupid to say what he said, but until that moment, he'd accepted everything in his stride. There is not a single Australian player, past or present that has the right to complain about non walkers. The walkers can't complain because they'd be at odds with their team mates. Lehmann and Flower have a lot more in common than you want to believe.

  • The_Rohit on August 22, 2013, 1:56 GMT

    These comments remind me of India after the twin whitewashes in England and Australia - let them come over and we'll show them. We'll have the crowd behind us. We'll have our revenge. Lehmann should check with the Indians - how did that turn out?

  • on August 22, 2013, 0:31 GMT

    Perhaps Darren Lehman seems to have made an immature comment. Not what one would expect out of a coach. A fine example for a coach would be Gary Kirsten!

  • McGorium on August 21, 2013, 23:51 GMT

    I know Lehmann wasn't playing during the controversial India-Aus game in 2008 at Sydney (where Kumble repeated Woodfull's quote about only one side playing cricket), but I expect he would remember it. Australia were in deep trouble (4 down I think, with less than 100 runs on the board), and Andrew Symmonds edged Ishant Sharma to the keeper. It was such an obvious nick that it was shocking Bucknor couldn't hear it. Symmonds went on to make a big century, and India lost the match. In a press conference just after the game, Symmonds acknowledged that he had nicked the ball but that it wasn't his business to walk. A similar fuss was made by Indians, accusing Symmonds of cheating. Of course, nothing came of it: neither Ponting nor the ACB did anything about it. I'm sure Lehmann himself must've refused to walk on various occassions. So why the fuss now? Cognitive dissonance?

  • Redbacks_Bite on August 21, 2013, 23:47 GMT

    Very Good Articlr, Brydon. Hard to comprehend how these Aussies think. Weather it's Lehman or Malcolm Conn, obviously their mouth runs faster than the brain..

  • sanshe1238 on August 21, 2013, 23:27 GMT

    Yes i agree with the comments on Lehmann's coaching ability. He is a great bloke, did his part as a cricketer but not sure what he is going to do as an international coach. Australia still has a great side and a talented bunch of players. What they lack is a good coach who could get the team together and start wining again. It was a hammering during the Ashes series, but take the positives and build the team so when the Brits tour down under you will have a good side to give them a run. Please stop shadowing behind players not walking when they snick the ball and about the bad umpiring. Yes the umpiring was bad but it happens every game and every where in the world. Lets get it together Lehmann. Cheers

  • OneEyedAussie on August 21, 2013, 23:22 GMT

    The sad thing is that if Lehmann is talking to the Aussie media this way then he is probably saying worse to the players. The message he needs to be sending to his players is "we lost at Trent Bridge because of our top order batting", not "we lost at Trent Bridge because Stuart Broad didn't walk". The former is constructive and gives the players a way forward, the latter is pointless what if/but talk.

  • on August 21, 2013, 23:07 GMT

    Lehmann is further proof that the entire Australian "culure" and "system" was, and is, a sham. The dominated in the late 90s and 00s as they happened upon a bunch of genius players like Mcgrath, Warne, Gilchrist, Ponting, Hayden, Lee and the like. Now that those geniuses are gone and they are left with regular journeymen players, they are expectedly struggling - and doing all kinds of ridiculously foolish stuff in an attempt to recapture their "past glory".

  • Liquefierrrr on August 21, 2013, 23:01 GMT

    Lehmann is deflecting the media attention. The same media attention that has seen the name 'Watson' and 'LBW' placed 100s of times into many sources throughout the series.

    And Watson scores his highest ever test score.

    Lehmann, as every other, also knows this series is over so he's planting seeds for the next one that follows shortly thereafter.

    Lehmann said he'd make it a healthier environment for the players, fun when relevant (not when you are 3-0 down looking at a historically bad series) and an atmosphere where players don't walk eggshells or do homework and powerpoint presentations.

    This is not to be interpreted as 'have a laugh, yeah we're 3-0 down but you are all safe and can learn nothing and don't need to improve.'.

    There's still a balance, he's still committed to winning.

    Broad will absolutely get it when he lands here though, mark Lehmann's words. Let's see him snick to slip or tie his shoes up for 10 minutes then.

  • RamnathIyer on August 21, 2013, 22:53 GMT

    Is Lehmann the best that Australia can find as a coach? I mean, really??? A coach advocating, or should I say instigating, crowds to target a player! A coach proudly acclaiming that his players sledge - "they're calling him everything under the sun as they go past". As Brydon says, how has that worked out?.... On evidence, Lehmann is just a mean spirited LOSER. I will not comment on his logical abilities or apparent intelligence.

  • JimmyDee on August 21, 2013, 22:17 GMT

    I was fairly optimistic when Lehmann was appointed coach albeit as a result of the ugly Arthur affair. He approached it with a "hard and disciplined but fair, with a sense of fun" type mantra. He spoke about the players behavior and how no one was immune to the punishments when stepping out of line. His, dare i say it, Broadside, was exactly the same as one of his players launching a tirade on Twitter! Sound familiar? The hypocrisy in his statement is so obvious it's embarrassing! We are 3 nil down and yet again we are focusing where we shouldn't! Obviously hoping for more, was hoping too much.

  • __PK on August 21, 2013, 22:09 GMT

    Wrong. There are two big differences between a blatant cheat and not walking on a thin edge. One, you can't be sure with a thin nick. Two, if you don't walk on an obvious edge then you're treating the rest of the world as idiots, expecting them to believe that rubbish. Your argument (which seems to lack a minimum measure of reason) isn't made any better by your ad hominem fallacy in deriding the radio show, no matter how many times you sneeringly use the word "bloke" in a single paragraph.

  • on August 21, 2013, 22:07 GMT

    Lehman's comments - tongue in cheek or not - just reinforces the belief that Australians can but are not always good winners, but are always poor, very sore losers. SalMon Mariner

  • piechucker31 on August 21, 2013, 22:04 GMT

    Front-Foot-Sponge, he did NOT hit it to slip. I'm not entirely sure what point you are making overall, maybe several different points, but one thing is for definite, the ball deflected off of Haddin's gloves towards first slip.

  • Chris_P on August 21, 2013, 22:01 GMT

    Wow,I hope someone actually heard was said. The morning radio show is a light-hearted comedy effort & there was nowhere near the malice the media has spread. It was said in a joking manner, Boof was chuckling half the time being urged on by a couple of the DJ's. Do yourself a favour & check out 2MMM website & listen to how it was said, certainly wasn't in a nasty way. Unbelievable reporting.

  • Number_5 on August 21, 2013, 21:54 GMT

    Lets put the comments on the quality of Boof as a coach to one side for a moment. Australia, the underdogs and 4th ranked team atm are 0-3 down. If not for Broad not "walking" after hitting one to first slip, they could be 1-2. The rained out test, 2-2. An appalling capitulation in the last test deserved harsh words, not ego massaging like a picking a flowers, a better performance there, in 1 session and it could be 2-2. But its not, Eng have played the better cricket at crucial times and deserve their 3-0 lead. Aus have played their best cricket as a unit for many years and Boof is one of the reasons for that. A few people are upset Broads been called a "Cheat", well quite a few were also disappointed when he stood there like a child caught with their hand in the lollie jar after clearly hitting it. Suck it up boys. You do the crime, do the time. Its been a great Ashes series and cant wait for the return leg.

  • Shan156 on August 21, 2013, 21:08 GMT

    @Front-Foot-Sponge, of course, Symonds edging behind and not walking when the whole world, except Bucknor, heard the edge was OK. Clarke not walking after edging to, erm, slip off Kumble in the same Sydney test was OK. Ponting and Clarke claiming 'catches' that were taken on the bounce in the same test was OK. But, Broad not walking is not OK because he is English and the other 2 gentlemen are Aussies?

    Look, I don't support Broad for not walking. I think he should have but players have every right to wait for the umpire's decision. And, if Australia had not wasted their 2 reviews (mind you, India in Sydney did not have that luxury), they could have used one right there and sent Broad on his way. Broad knew that Aus. had used up their reviews and took a chance with the umpire's decision which turned out to be in his favor. Do I support it? No. Should he have walked? yes but Aussie players and former players have no right blasting an English player for that reason.

  • PabuXI on August 21, 2013, 20:30 GMT

    Great Article Mr. Coverdale. Sir, You have nailed it. You have pulled words out from the mouths of most English fans and cricket fanatics who would have expected a competitive series and ended up witnessing a one sided ashes. Cricket Australia's biggest error has been, bringing in Lehman (until now, seems like that). Being an Indian, and also a fan of English cricket team, I have been witnessed the moves of both Kirsten and Flower. Both have been one of the best coaches/ mentors, the cricketing world has seen till date. The 1st thing Lehman has to learn is to provide support to his budding players. Hughes, Khawaja, Agar, Bird, Starc are victims of Leh's selection which doesn't make any sense.Root has only one match winning knock, but he has not been pushed back thereby providing him confidence.Dropping Hughes, Starc is unjustifiable, will make them more vulnerable in the future on field .So Mr. Leh, you have got it wrong & we expect some competition in future rather than going on a ran

  • lala_fan on August 21, 2013, 19:33 GMT

    bull's eye...lehman is trying to be like border and waugh in psyching out the opposition but australians should improve their performance instead of pulling down others.

  • on August 21, 2013, 19:24 GMT

    What hypocrisy from Lehmann! It is quite baffling that such comments come from Australian coach. The same Australia, which literally cheated in Sydney against India not very long ago.

  • Masking_Tape on August 21, 2013, 19:05 GMT

    "a blokey interview on a blokey Australian radio station to appeal to Aussie blokes" then why are you guys making a big fuss about this blokey interview? Let it go.

  • suubsy on August 21, 2013, 18:39 GMT

    An individual generally gives a glimpse of their true colors in times of adversity. This interview confirms that a person who might look the most cool and calm like Lehmann is just half the side of his personality, other half is what we see here. It is perfectly human for him to react this way. Aussies should realize that Lehmann is not any special guy to turn things around. I have read and heard from past Aussie players that Lehmann is the best thing to happen and he will play hard but also enjoy life. Not very long ago Lehman gave an example of Gillespie's father's death and that players should put things into perspective and cricket is just a game and not life and death. Within a month he is now talking trash and revenge and instigating an entire sporting public of Australia to go against one person Stuart Broad. God please help Mr Lehman. This is where Dhoni, and his attitude gets highlighted, he lost 0-8 in Eng/Aus but he rubbished thoughts of revenge when Ind beat Aus 4-0.

  • M.Usman-Sharif on August 21, 2013, 18:36 GMT

    BAng on target yes... loved it... Why dont Lehmann ask his fellows like symonds and langer and ponting who has historically stood after edges and claimed false catches? and what abt sydney test where clarke stood his ground after nick to slip? and waited for umpire decision? he must teach these manners to his captain first and then to england

  • AussieSam on August 21, 2013, 18:32 GMT

    Oh come on. I agree that it's incorrect to say not walking is cheating. Maybe Lehmann's comments were a bit silly but they weren't exactly a measured polemic or even an angry outburst for that matter, it was a bit of light hearted joking around on a radio station. And trust me, the Aussie fans didn't need to be incited to go after Broad. Much, much worse things get said on a cricket field than "you're a cheater." I don't think it's fair to compare what he said to the comments by Hayden and Symonds either, and you've got to be joking if you think he'll be reprimanded for it.

    Faulkner has earned a place in this side, his selection shouldn't surprise anyone. I'm not a big fan of the shuffling around of the batting order but as Arthur revealed they were going to be trying out a few things this series with the plan of being well prepared for the home series. I'll be surprised if they shuffle the selections as much in the next five Tests.

  • on August 21, 2013, 18:20 GMT

    Please may I ask Lehmann whether he has tried walking anytime in his life? ;)

  • GermanPlayer on August 21, 2013, 18:13 GMT

    Rtuen Ashes series => First Point to England! Eng 1-0 Aus

  • on August 21, 2013, 17:57 GMT

    It was nonsensicall from Lehmann, to say the least. I don't think the Australian skipper will be saying too many things to Broad, afterall he edged Anil Kumble to slip(not a deflection of the keeper's ppads but a straightforward catch to slip and stood there waiting for what?

  • PPD123 on August 21, 2013, 17:45 GMT

    England will cop a few (and more) when they go to Aus for the return tour. I guess they know and expect that. Lehmann needs to ensure that players are in the right mindset and not always feeling like having a sword hanging over their heads. He will also have to learn quickly to stay behind the scenes- something which he did with Deccan chargers. I think with the results not having gone their way... Lehmann is showing some frustrations. Lets accept the fact that this English side is a better one that Aus. Aus has to play above themselves in every match to compete and challenege this Eng side - even in home environment later this year.

  • njr1330 on August 21, 2013, 17:43 GMT

    1. In the interview, Lehmann says '..to third slip' not first. 2. I have checked the film on You Tube; the ball hits Haddin's left wrist, before going to slip. It's not as blatant as people would have you believe [although Broad must have felt it]. I think Broad is stunned that the finger does not go up, and is in some kind of blur for a few seconds. 3. You have to walk straight away, not 5 minutes later. Once the moment has gone, it's gone. 4. Shouldn't the focus be on the appallingly incompetent umpiring, that didn't see or hear the nick. If Broad had been given out, he surely would not have complained about it.5. Lehmann is an oaf, whose pronouncements should not be taken seriously. 6. Inciting a riot, is never a good idea.

  • Bogie55 on August 21, 2013, 17:19 GMT

    Better check that perspective again, Front-Foot-Sponge - Broad nicked it to Haddin, who palmed it to slip (quite a big nick admittedly, but still a nick). You're entitled to stand your ground for as long as it takes the umpire to lift his finger, no matter how you're out; though in some cases you'd look more foolish than others.<br> <br> In terms of sportsmanship, you can either make an argument for walking or not walking, since you can only be out or not out. No dismissed batsman is any less out than any other dismissed batsman. If you really think it's OK for batsman to stay put for a thin nick, how does a batsman measure the size of the edge for which they must walk?

  • marlon17 on August 21, 2013, 17:07 GMT

    excellent article..spot on

  • on August 21, 2013, 16:27 GMT

    Lehman is one of the poorest coaches going around, even his IPL team lost almost all the matches

  • JPrats on August 21, 2013, 15:43 GMT

    While I agree with most part of this article, I still think that Coverdale has 'missed a point'! When Broad can boast that he had cheated, what stops others from saying that he has. Infact no body except the media and comentators disussed about this issue then and now it seems like erupting again following Broad's talk. Agreed that all others including couple of other players from England dressing room nicked the ball and waited for umpires signal. But nobody did boast as this bloke did. Why are the double standards here?? However I do not support the un-sportsmanship words from the Australia Coach to give Broad a go later this year. FYI I am neither Eng nor Aus supporter, a neutral fan of the game.

  • whoster on August 21, 2013, 15:32 GMT

    Excellent article. After conducting himself impressively throughout the series, Lehmann has talked more astounding rubbish in a single interview than Mickey Arthur did throughout his whole tenure as coach - quite an achievement!

    Perhaps it's a left-field tactic from Lehmann to divert the flak away from his players. If it is, it's working a treat.

  • sramesh_74 on August 21, 2013, 15:30 GMT

    What is it about the job of Aussie cricket team coach that attracts some unbelievable characters like Buchanan (remember the military camp??), Mickey 'homework' Arthur and now Lehmann??? Maybe CA can help us understand!!

  • Sameer-hbk on August 21, 2013, 15:23 GMT

    What the Aussie coach said seems to be purely aimed at Aussie fans for next Ashes. he wants them to target Broad verbally. Give him a bit of stick while fielding in the outfield, maybe. That is fine. Sure, Aussies themselves are no better. And Lehmann surely knows that too. But what caught my attention was the author saying: "Of course, none of these men are cheats, for players are under no obligation to walk." Yes, but is that really the only way to play? We want ICC to own up more responsibility. We want umpires to be almost perfect. But players... It is okay to stand even though you know you nicked it? I am aware of the arguments from the other side. But is the 'law' is the only definitive measure? "to deprive of something valuable by the use of deceit or fraud " is cheating. That is what the batsman does to the bowler when he doesn't walk. Btw, what is stopping the ICC from making it an "obligation to walk"?

  • Wayne_Larkins_Barnet on August 21, 2013, 14:57 GMT

    Nope, I think you have to put this into perspective. Broad hit the cover off it to slip. If he chipped it back to the bowler and stood his ground what would you say? You can't compare a nick to leathering it. If a batsman is plumb LBW (you know when you are) should they walk? Of course not. Notice how Broad has turned and walked every time since? It is entirely fair that Broad has attracted attention, he obviously hit the ball, stood his ground, and did so on TV. What I disagree with is inciting the public to target a player in the way Lehmann has. I am all for a bit of niggle but it should remain between the players.

  • SunAndSea on August 21, 2013, 14:56 GMT

    Good response. Lehmann's becoming a laughing stock.

  • on August 21, 2013, 14:52 GMT

    Excellent article !! Perfectly written, especially highlighting Broad's significant improvement in performances after the incident !!

  • Sri_Lankan_Fan on August 21, 2013, 14:49 GMT

    Excellent Article .. Spot on ..,

  • Dema-David on August 21, 2013, 14:41 GMT

    Is he (Darren Lehmann) calling Steve Waugh (and his brother Mark) (a) blatant cheat(s) too? Thought i remember reading somewhere, Steve advocated never to walk unless the umpire gives out! Except, like Boycott said, only (maybe) Gilchrist may have walked. Not the rest. This (comment), in fact, an admission, thaht he (Lehman) cannot win a test without the help of the Australian public! That's what he is calling for. lol! Mind sets. They have their own laws. We know how the aussies played their games, the last few decades. They don't seem to like their own medicene! lol.

  • Goldmens on August 21, 2013, 14:38 GMT

    When an Aussie player does... it's fine....and when the world does it's wrong!

  • on August 21, 2013, 13:57 GMT

    Excellent article, simply excellent, and much needed .

  • on August 21, 2013, 13:38 GMT

    Darren Lehmann sounds like he still wants to be Mr Popular. You don't see Andy Flower worrying about that

  • muzika_tchaikovskogo on August 21, 2013, 13:24 GMT

    Just goes to show how far results cloud our assessment of captains/ coaches. Just a few weeks ago, Lehmann was being built up as the messiah who would turn things around with the wave of a magic wand. Sadly, he just doesn't have the team to take on even an average/ slightly above average English side.

  • HughL on August 21, 2013, 13:09 GMT

    A spot on article. No one has the moral high ground in this debate. Leave it to umpires and various technologies to sort out and use your reviews wisely- and as has been the case since the year dot, if you still cop a bad decision just move on and accept that you'll get one back

  • Smiling on August 21, 2013, 13:09 GMT

    Spot on Mr Coverdale............

  • cloudmess on August 21, 2013, 13:03 GMT

    He was a brilliant cricketer and is a genuinely good bloke, but Lehmann probably still has a little maturing to do as an international coach. His selection policies over the course of this series have been a la England in the 1980s/90s, always picking your team for the previous match, and showing little consistency.

  • 11_Warrior on August 21, 2013, 12:37 GMT

    Absolutely bang on target

  • 11_Warrior on August 21, 2013, 12:37 GMT

    Absolutely bang on target

  • cloudmess on August 21, 2013, 13:03 GMT

    He was a brilliant cricketer and is a genuinely good bloke, but Lehmann probably still has a little maturing to do as an international coach. His selection policies over the course of this series have been a la England in the 1980s/90s, always picking your team for the previous match, and showing little consistency.

  • Smiling on August 21, 2013, 13:09 GMT

    Spot on Mr Coverdale............

  • HughL on August 21, 2013, 13:09 GMT

    A spot on article. No one has the moral high ground in this debate. Leave it to umpires and various technologies to sort out and use your reviews wisely- and as has been the case since the year dot, if you still cop a bad decision just move on and accept that you'll get one back

  • muzika_tchaikovskogo on August 21, 2013, 13:24 GMT

    Just goes to show how far results cloud our assessment of captains/ coaches. Just a few weeks ago, Lehmann was being built up as the messiah who would turn things around with the wave of a magic wand. Sadly, he just doesn't have the team to take on even an average/ slightly above average English side.

  • on August 21, 2013, 13:38 GMT

    Darren Lehmann sounds like he still wants to be Mr Popular. You don't see Andy Flower worrying about that

  • on August 21, 2013, 13:57 GMT

    Excellent article, simply excellent, and much needed .

  • Goldmens on August 21, 2013, 14:38 GMT

    When an Aussie player does... it's fine....and when the world does it's wrong!

  • Dema-David on August 21, 2013, 14:41 GMT

    Is he (Darren Lehmann) calling Steve Waugh (and his brother Mark) (a) blatant cheat(s) too? Thought i remember reading somewhere, Steve advocated never to walk unless the umpire gives out! Except, like Boycott said, only (maybe) Gilchrist may have walked. Not the rest. This (comment), in fact, an admission, thaht he (Lehman) cannot win a test without the help of the Australian public! That's what he is calling for. lol! Mind sets. They have their own laws. We know how the aussies played their games, the last few decades. They don't seem to like their own medicene! lol.

  • Sri_Lankan_Fan on August 21, 2013, 14:49 GMT

    Excellent Article .. Spot on ..,