October 6, 2013

Australia's pointless tour to India could lead to selection blunders

The temptation to pick those who do well in the ODIs for the Ashes is a dangerous one, especially given there is still no No. 6 batsman in sight
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Cricket Australia obviously doesn't believe in omens - certainly not the bad variety.

Prior to the 2010-11 Ashes in Australia, the team toured India. They lost the Test series 2-0 and followed that with an adverse Ashes result at home. Having recently lost an away Ashes series by 3-0, Australia are tempting fate by embarking on another Indian tour ahead of another home Ashes.

At least this time it's only limited-overs and very few of the Test players will be involved in the tour. Nevertheless, India has been a black hole of late for Australian teams. It was a 4-0 loss earlier in the year that precipitated Australia's slide down the Test-match ladder, and the country's two teams in the Champions League - Perth Scorchers and Brisbane Heat - recently left India without a victory and with their tails between their legs.

Agreeing to this meaningless ODI tour of India so close to an Ashes series is evidence that Cricket Australia is more concerned with dollars than sense.

Australia's mounting Test losses not only hurt in the record book but have also shredded the team's aura. During the golden years Australian teams had an inbuilt advantage; many of their opponents were half-beaten the moment they looked at the opposing team list. However, once Australia started to lose, other teams felt empowered, sensing vulnerability.

Australia's weakness in this bleak period has been batting in general, and coping with good spin bowling in particular. The flaws have become so glaring that at a Lord's Taverners function I attended recently in London, the comments from former players were pointed. "What's happened to Australian batsmanship?" was the welcome from past opponents before I received the obligatory "Oh, and by the way, how are you?"

The glaring batting weakness will be exacerbated in India by the absence of Michael Clarke, easily the best player of spin in the Australian side. Without Clarke to guide them and be a steady source of runs, Australia are at risk of again losing in India. While few from the ODI team will be in contention for the Test side, a demoralising loss on the eve of an Ashes series won't help Australian morale, while it will boost England's outlook.

The only good news surrounding Clarke's withdrawal from the Indian tour is that it might mean he'll get some much-needed red-ball match practice under Australian conditions. On the other hand if his injury curtails his cricket in Australia, it'll be a huge handicap to the team if he's either unavailable or underdone for the Gabba Test.

Not only is the scheduling of this tour badly timed for the players, it also hasn't done the Australian selectors any favours. Normally at this time they would be gauging batting candidates for the No. 6 position in the Test side based on their domestic first-class form. Now they'll feel obliged to take into account any contenders who put up good performances on the tour of India.

This could lead to some selection blunders. Runs scored in the relative serenity of a 50-over game are a far cry from those that need to be earned in the pressure-cooker atmosphere of an Ashes Test against a good attack.

I don't see a potential No. 6 Test batsman in the ODI squad. Worse still, there are a few batsmen in that squad who are vulnerable against spin bowling, a weakness the Indians are sure to exploit. This means potential contenders could return to Australia's firmer pitches with their confidence undermined.

It has been obvious for some time that the No. 1 priority among cricket administrators is the bottom line, and the timing of this ODI tour is further proof. What wasn't so obvious was that Cricket Australia isn't superstitious and nor does it believe in bad omens.

Former Australia captain Ian Chappell is now a cricket commentator for Channel 9, and a columnist

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • Rahul_78 on October 6, 2013, 7:00 GMT

    Welcome to the new age cricket administration Ian! Long gone are the days of arriving on the shores early, getting 3-4 practice games under your belt and geting accustomed to the new environment. Australia, England and India have become epitome of cricket commercialism recently. With bigger TV deals, more tours between themselves and milking the holy cow of Tests and ODI's to the fullest is the unbridled priority. Players are just a small cog in the bigger wheel driven by the commercialism, big bucks and opportunism. It was logical that OZ cricket would have fallen on the hard times after mass exodus of former greats at approximately same time. But today's OZ batsmen in particular lacks class, temperament and technic which is a direct effect of feeding your youngsters on the junk food diet of T20 and ODI cricket. Depriving them to evolve their game on red ball cricket. In near future don't be surprised if the same problems you will see in young players from India and England.

  • Beertjie on October 11, 2013, 9:35 GMT

    One name I don't see mentioned is Doolan. Although he's not a #6 (he was #3 last season), he could slot in at #5 with Smith moving to 6. He just needs to repeat his form of early last season. Of course he failed vs SA A, but the stocks being what they are he deserves consideration if he scores well.

  • xtrafalgarx on October 9, 2013, 15:12 GMT

    @SSChicago, Spot on mate. As a follower of Aussie cricket i am disappointed by the general sentiment that the Indian tour is a waste of time. Put it this way, if the series in India was a guaranteed win against the number 1 ODI side in the world, i think everyone would be happy with us touring there.

    Like Chicago put it, this could be the spark we need to reignite the winning ways of old, any win is always a good win.

  • borninthetimeofSRT on October 8, 2013, 12:29 GMT

    This is a fine example of how much Aussies want to give importance to the Ashes. At the time when they are on the receiving end, nothing seems more important than getting the Urn back. The biggest reason for Aus downfall is perhaps their obsession with one opponent in one format of the game. As for the India tour, Bailey seems to have is head in place. No tour or experience is meaningless, and that too in the subcontinent. This might just be the spark the Aussies need. This tour may do wonders for them. Think positive! Aus- Ind contests have always had a flair, and we are all waiting for the new Haydens and the Gilchrists and the Pontings to surprise us. Bring them on!!

  • latecut_04 on October 8, 2013, 4:15 GMT

    Ian is spot on here.BUT as he points out majority of test side wont be playing here and there are less chances of Ashes prospects getting affected.(unlike last time.)Although I should agree last time I enjoyed that nail biting Mohali finish thoroughly.Kudos to him for blaming Aus management dollar chase.Wish more of the same from sane minds around the world.@electric_loco_WAP4 "young Aus side whose whole mind will be on impending Ashes "-seriously?How many young minds here would be thinking of the test series or being brutally honest how many are competant to think(including the skipper?).Fans like you still live in Aus golden age and that is a part of the problem.

  • DRS_Flawed_NeedsImprovement on October 8, 2013, 3:36 GMT

    ashes is the only meaningful bilateral series in the cricketting world - for whole oz and eng.

  • msagar on October 8, 2013, 1:44 GMT

    No tour is pointless. As professional cricketers they have to play whenever and wherever they are required to play. But talking about pointless - this article fits the bill. We all know Ian's bias and his thought process having read his articles in the past. In the past - that he is where unfortunately he is stuck.

  • OneEyedAussie on October 8, 2013, 1:43 GMT

    The problems caused by the India tour are exacerbated by the uncertainty surrounding the Australian 11 in Brisbane. From my point of view, we want guys like Bailey playing in our domestic scene so that if they make a hundred we can pick them for the Ashes. There are at least 2 batting positions open in our line-up and we need more options than Hughes/Warner/Khawaja.

  • on October 8, 2013, 1:35 GMT

    @rama - what spinners. Likes of ashwin and jadeja are ordinary who got hammered in Australia and took wickets on doctored pitches where even nathan lyon took 9 wickets in a test match. I completely agree with chappel. These pitches will most likely be flat.

  • Andrew73 on October 8, 2013, 1:11 GMT

    The bottom line is not Cricket Australia's No.1 priority - it is their only priority. They've been doing this sort of ridiculous stuff for so long I've almost stopped tearing my hair out, but when you care about the game it's hard not to. The end game might be in the hands of the Indian public - the aura of the Aussie team is gone, will their puling power remain? if CA policy keeps driving the team's performance in the wrong direction, are Indian fans going to keep tuning in and turning up in droves to watch their team play a bunch of clueless also-rans? If the answer is yes, then sadly I can't see any change coming - in the way the CA board approach things, as the money will keep flowing.

  • Rahul_78 on October 6, 2013, 7:00 GMT

    Welcome to the new age cricket administration Ian! Long gone are the days of arriving on the shores early, getting 3-4 practice games under your belt and geting accustomed to the new environment. Australia, England and India have become epitome of cricket commercialism recently. With bigger TV deals, more tours between themselves and milking the holy cow of Tests and ODI's to the fullest is the unbridled priority. Players are just a small cog in the bigger wheel driven by the commercialism, big bucks and opportunism. It was logical that OZ cricket would have fallen on the hard times after mass exodus of former greats at approximately same time. But today's OZ batsmen in particular lacks class, temperament and technic which is a direct effect of feeding your youngsters on the junk food diet of T20 and ODI cricket. Depriving them to evolve their game on red ball cricket. In near future don't be surprised if the same problems you will see in young players from India and England.

  • Beertjie on October 11, 2013, 9:35 GMT

    One name I don't see mentioned is Doolan. Although he's not a #6 (he was #3 last season), he could slot in at #5 with Smith moving to 6. He just needs to repeat his form of early last season. Of course he failed vs SA A, but the stocks being what they are he deserves consideration if he scores well.

  • xtrafalgarx on October 9, 2013, 15:12 GMT

    @SSChicago, Spot on mate. As a follower of Aussie cricket i am disappointed by the general sentiment that the Indian tour is a waste of time. Put it this way, if the series in India was a guaranteed win against the number 1 ODI side in the world, i think everyone would be happy with us touring there.

    Like Chicago put it, this could be the spark we need to reignite the winning ways of old, any win is always a good win.

  • borninthetimeofSRT on October 8, 2013, 12:29 GMT

    This is a fine example of how much Aussies want to give importance to the Ashes. At the time when they are on the receiving end, nothing seems more important than getting the Urn back. The biggest reason for Aus downfall is perhaps their obsession with one opponent in one format of the game. As for the India tour, Bailey seems to have is head in place. No tour or experience is meaningless, and that too in the subcontinent. This might just be the spark the Aussies need. This tour may do wonders for them. Think positive! Aus- Ind contests have always had a flair, and we are all waiting for the new Haydens and the Gilchrists and the Pontings to surprise us. Bring them on!!

  • latecut_04 on October 8, 2013, 4:15 GMT

    Ian is spot on here.BUT as he points out majority of test side wont be playing here and there are less chances of Ashes prospects getting affected.(unlike last time.)Although I should agree last time I enjoyed that nail biting Mohali finish thoroughly.Kudos to him for blaming Aus management dollar chase.Wish more of the same from sane minds around the world.@electric_loco_WAP4 "young Aus side whose whole mind will be on impending Ashes "-seriously?How many young minds here would be thinking of the test series or being brutally honest how many are competant to think(including the skipper?).Fans like you still live in Aus golden age and that is a part of the problem.

  • DRS_Flawed_NeedsImprovement on October 8, 2013, 3:36 GMT

    ashes is the only meaningful bilateral series in the cricketting world - for whole oz and eng.

  • msagar on October 8, 2013, 1:44 GMT

    No tour is pointless. As professional cricketers they have to play whenever and wherever they are required to play. But talking about pointless - this article fits the bill. We all know Ian's bias and his thought process having read his articles in the past. In the past - that he is where unfortunately he is stuck.

  • OneEyedAussie on October 8, 2013, 1:43 GMT

    The problems caused by the India tour are exacerbated by the uncertainty surrounding the Australian 11 in Brisbane. From my point of view, we want guys like Bailey playing in our domestic scene so that if they make a hundred we can pick them for the Ashes. There are at least 2 batting positions open in our line-up and we need more options than Hughes/Warner/Khawaja.

  • on October 8, 2013, 1:35 GMT

    @rama - what spinners. Likes of ashwin and jadeja are ordinary who got hammered in Australia and took wickets on doctored pitches where even nathan lyon took 9 wickets in a test match. I completely agree with chappel. These pitches will most likely be flat.

  • Andrew73 on October 8, 2013, 1:11 GMT

    The bottom line is not Cricket Australia's No.1 priority - it is their only priority. They've been doing this sort of ridiculous stuff for so long I've almost stopped tearing my hair out, but when you care about the game it's hard not to. The end game might be in the hands of the Indian public - the aura of the Aussie team is gone, will their puling power remain? if CA policy keeps driving the team's performance in the wrong direction, are Indian fans going to keep tuning in and turning up in droves to watch their team play a bunch of clueless also-rans? If the answer is yes, then sadly I can't see any change coming - in the way the CA board approach things, as the money will keep flowing.

  • Nerk on October 8, 2013, 0:25 GMT

    Guys, Chappeli is not having a go at India, he is having a go at Australia and asking the question about whether a tour of India is a good warm up for an Ashes tour.

  • on October 7, 2013, 19:10 GMT

    Not going India may avoid losses, but that won't give Aussies lots of experience in batting or facing spinners! If Aussies don't have good batsmen, they need to dig deep into the fresh young guys. And finally need to know that a winter can come down on any team for a while. I would go through this patch intelligently, rather than calling meaningless (India tour) etc.

  • on October 7, 2013, 18:36 GMT

    Ian Chappell is an old relic of the past !.

  • Nerk on October 7, 2013, 18:05 GMT

    I totally disagree with Chappeli on this one. There is no way that Australia playing India in a ODI series could lead to a bad team selection. Particularly if you happen to be an English supporter and are just waiting for the next Xavier Doherty.

  • hhillbumper on October 7, 2013, 15:35 GMT

    7 Odis.Thank God there is something that makes India look like a decent team. At least we won't be seeing it in Uk so will avaoid the usual BCCI love in.At least if Aus are going to sell themselves at least have the decency to turn the lights out

  • Green_and_Gold on October 7, 2013, 15:12 GMT

    @DaisonGarvasis - sounds like he is blaming the Australian cricket management to me and NOT India. Its up to the Aussie management to schedule games that it plays in and they could have said no to the tour (or have modified it so that the players have better prep for the home series). Its a bit ridiculous the Eng get to Aus before the home team to prepare for the ashes. I dont think the series is meaningless but i do think that the ashes holds more weight (a. test cricket, b. history of playing Eng) so more thought should have been given before agreeing to the schedule.

  • on October 7, 2013, 14:04 GMT

    the series in my opinion will be a great place to breed good talents. In india patience is the key and if the Aussie batsmen often accused of not being patient and playing long innings, this is the right opportunity.

  • electric_loco_WAP4 on October 7, 2013, 13:01 GMT

    Another boring ODI series vs a team that is master on flat home pitches and young Aus side whose whole mind will be on impending Ashes .May very well be yet another long drawn out tedious affair all will wait to finish. On other note ,def. Johnson with the way he is bowling, will be 1 of few attractions of the ODIs and when he gets it right @95 mph he will single handedly win couple of games for Aus.Of course Watson has to bat to his potential and young Aus bats should chip in as well.

  • Amith_S on October 7, 2013, 12:09 GMT

    I have to agree wtih Mary that we must be picking batsman on early shield runs. My gut feel is that with the batsman the likes of Warner, Khawaja and Maddinson will make the full squad with early shield runs. As much as Khawaja got a raw deal with only 3 games its good for him to go back and score early shield runs as his ability to play pace well will be crucial on pitches which will be the opposite of what Swann wants. Also watch out for Warner making a strong showing early in the shield season, boof is making the likes of Warner, Khawaja hungry for their positions and thats good, no favoritism. I am not in favour of Bailey playing at 6 until he gets shield runs as he averaged below 20 last year in shield. If we don't take shield performances into account then why have a state competition. Sure ODI's can be taken into consideration but keep in mind that the conditions our boys will face in India will not prepare them for what's coming against the POMs on our pitches, only shield will

  • on October 7, 2013, 11:37 GMT

    With this tour Australia will benefit definitely in their bowling department, max of 80 overs / bowler will be a good test on batting pitches and formidable batting side in home condition. India tour before ashes did help the Aussies as their bowler did a good job, the problem was with the batting line-up. Given the home conditions for next Ashes, batsman should put up a decent show, so it should be good prep for Aussies?

  • on October 7, 2013, 11:09 GMT

    When the past Australian team was steam rolling all their opponents in every format in every conditions, Chappell never made such comments. Now that they are no longer the best team in the world, experts like him are looking for every opportunity to blame the system, board, money, BCCI etc etc. It is still cricket...You have to make runs and take wickets to win matches. Stop this Non-Sense and play cricket.

  • on October 7, 2013, 9:43 GMT

    @Mr.Chappell, Cricket is not only about Ashes, its broader than that. Its a shame that you are reflecting your personal sentiments here as some of ur past opponents taunted you before saying a hello. on a separate note Australian cricket board has not doing wrong here as they're there to run an organisation,in simpler terms they have to finance running costs,pay salaries. they can't just sit back and wait only for Ashes FTP to run the organisation.

  • Mary_786 on October 7, 2013, 9:34 GMT

    Good article by Chappell. I think the selectors have got the ODI team right, the young batsman who need to stay back for shield cricket i.e Warner, Khawaja, Smith ,Burns will be playing shield and Clarke also should play at least 1 shield match despite reports on his back as he knows how to manage it well. I am hoping Warner, Khawaja and Smith get early shield runs as well. My only concern is Watson playing the ODIs after playing Champions trophy as he will have too much short form cricket under his belt rathre then shield cricket.

  • Big_Maxy_Walker on October 7, 2013, 8:11 GMT

    To me Cameron White is a possibility if his strong one day form continues into shield cricket. Mature player, good against spin, good fielder and a much needed right hander to negate some of Swann's influence. Was picked for his spin much like Steve Smith originally, and has improved his batting immensely. Might be worth a second look by the selectors

  • DaisonGarvasis on October 7, 2013, 7:54 GMT

    Yeah, good old fashion - blame India if things dont go right for you

  • on October 7, 2013, 6:31 GMT

    Its different times Ian.Teams and players, no longer have the luxury of preparing for the upcoming test season by playing a decent amount of first class cricket.With the cricket calendar being as crammed as it is these days,and intense competition for spots,players are reluctant to let any opportunity that comes their way slip,except those already secure of their place in the side. Its up to the players then to acclimatise to different conditions as quickly as they can and perform.Can't afford to be superstitious these days. However,the point you make about picking batsmen based on their form in the shorter format is absolutely valid,unless the selectors feel that the player has the temperament and ability to flourish in test matches in Australian conditions.

  • anilrajan22 on October 7, 2013, 6:16 GMT

    I do agree with the match practice in a similar condition where actual battle will be fought, however considering present Australian bench strength apart from batting techniques issues, they lack confidence under pressure situation. India tour will be useful to test technique against spin, and spending some valuable time on crease to boost the confidence with highest level of cricketing surroundings. These aspects should come handy for selection. Anyway we would have preferred SA tour instead, but boards have their obligations to their stakeholders.

  • Sir_Ivor on October 7, 2013, 4:48 GMT

    I can understand how very difficult it has been to stomach the way the Poms were beaten Australia in the last two Ashes encounters. But the fact of the matter is that like India Pakistan games now public frenzy to an Ashes series has been on the wane.The sight of millions of egg and bacon ties in the Compton's and Edrich's atands at Lords is more of the past than the present. Even the loss to England this time was not as bad as the 3-0 suggests. It was closer from the first Test which they lost just by 14 runs. The second was an old fashioned hammering but Australia could have won the third and the fifth. I believe the visit to India now may just turn out to their advantage. The dramatis personae might be better prepared and there could be some separation of chaff from grain. I am sure Ian will agree at the end of the Indian tour that it was a good idea.

  • on October 7, 2013, 4:13 GMT

    be positive folks! Enjoy the game. They are not coming to steal anything from your home! Relax, give the guys credit for providing entertainment. This is not a school test, it is cricketainment !

  • Dangertroy on October 7, 2013, 3:20 GMT

    While I agree that the scheduling is a bit suspect, it's quite ironic to see Ian Chappell condemning something as a cash grab...

    I think we've picked a good squad to tour, leaving most of the test players at home. To prep for the ashes. Bailey is likely the only one who would be near the test team, I know his record isn't wonderful in cc cricket, but his neither are his list A stats, yet he makes a superb odi player. I'd back him to step up to test level adequately, right now I'd take an average of 38 for our number 5/6. I can just see he and Clarke bat for an entire day in Sydney or Melbourne...

  • cricketsubh on October 7, 2013, 2:35 GMT

    i donot agree with mr chappell u canot play only ashes cricket and not playing any other cricket in canoy happen .berly said odi cricket is as gud as test i agree with that you can take gud from of odi cricket in to test cricket .

  • samincolumbia on October 7, 2013, 1:54 GMT

    Just like the ODI series is pointless to an aussie, the Ashes is pointless to the rest of the world, except for the poms and aussies.

  • GeoffreysMother on October 6, 2013, 22:13 GMT

    Rohit Ramesh - don't worry I am sure the BCCI can set up a Super Champions League Ultimate World Final Series to keep Indian fans happy whist the rest of the world gets on with test cricket. It could even include another final appearance by Sachin before his final test appearance against the W Indies. No doubt the Windies have agreed to be all out in 20 overs so local interest does not wane!

  • landl47 on October 6, 2013, 22:06 GMT

    @cnksnk: your points would be valid if Australia was indeed sending a bunch of youngsters to India. However, this ODI squad is neither young nor inexperienced. 7 of them are over 30 and unless injuries intervene they are likely to play all the ODIs. Only 3 players in the squad are under 25, and of them Maxwell will turn 25 during the tour and Hughes shortly after it finishes. The only true youngster is Faulkner, 23, and he is a bowling allrounder, not a contender for a batting place- the area where Australia is weakest.

    Maddinson, who really would fit your picture of a young player not ready for tests being sent out to gain experience, is only in the T20 squad.

    It would be a major achievement if Aus made this series competitive, let alone won it. However, the biggest concern might be the lack of 22-24 year old prospects in the squad.

  • on October 6, 2013, 20:37 GMT

    What happened to Moises Henriques? In for one test then dropped!

  • R_U_4_REAL_NICK on October 6, 2013, 17:15 GMT

    Why single out the tour to India? The Ashes against England in England lead to so many selection blunders already as well. How can a team expect to win test series using short-format specialists like Warner in every game?

  • Rooto on October 6, 2013, 16:58 GMT

    On the one hand, Ian doesn't want people picked for tests due to ODI performances. On the other hand, Ian doesn't "see a potential test no.6 in the ODI squad," Hmm.

    Apart from that, wise words.

  • bobbo2 on October 6, 2013, 15:59 GMT

    This tour is madness given the Ashes stars soon.

  • Dashgar on October 6, 2013, 15:10 GMT

    In the end players will need to make runs to get selected. If someone is making loads of runs in India they have to be considered. Same is true of batsmen making runs in Ryobi Cup and Sheffield Shield. There's only so much cricket until the first test so players need to take their chances. True, ODI cricket in the sub-continent isn't the greatest form guide for Test cricket in Australia but it's still bat vs ball, same challenge for all players. If someone reels off a couple of hundreds then they deserve baggy green consideration.

  • xtrafalgarx on October 6, 2013, 14:59 GMT

    @hhillbumper, That aura talk is complete non-sense. The so called 'aura' is created when a team performs well over a period of time. No magic, no secret formula, it's not the baggy green it's just plain and simple performance over a period of time. It seems as if Chappelli thought that was going to remain even after the exit of the great players, well, if that's the case then i got news for him, Ain't gonna happen!

  • hhillbumper on October 6, 2013, 13:45 GMT

    Don't worry Chappeli the aura that you talk off is still alive.Sadly though it now seems it is Australia who are half defeated before they play the game because of the pressure to play Aussie style cricket.

    As for the ODI series,outside of India does anyone truly care? If India lose it will all be a conspiracy by someone and if they win we will get the usual tosh about the greatest players ever.

  • BatsmanWhoBowls on October 6, 2013, 11:23 GMT

    @KapilsDevils1983 ODIs and T20s are a fast, compact form of cricket. But at the heart, they are designed as cash cows, and, in my opinion, no true cricket fan should ever value ODIs or T20s over Tests. It's not co-incidence that players like Tendulkar, Ponting, Clarke and others have chosen to retire from short form cricket before their test retirements; it's to prolong their careers in the most important and amazing form of cricket. Cricket is about a series of incredible battles, tactics, planning, skill, concentration and other such factors. To believe that it could ever maintain the same true charisma after being compressed into a few hours is just naiive and short-sighted.

  • on October 6, 2013, 11:15 GMT

    These matches have become meaningless because of teams like Australia's regularly diminishing ODIs and T20s in behalf of tests. They always want to send out teams with lesser stars and take an I don't care approach. I was looking more forward to some entertainment from this ODI series then watching the likes of Cook, Root, Trott and Bell crawl at 2.50 runs an over for a day. Now due to Australia sending a team minus its proper players it has been made a farce.

  • skkh on October 6, 2013, 11:15 GMT

    I could see most of the posts here are critical of Ian. However the readers fail to see Ian's point of view. The Aussies have recently taken a beating in the just concluded Ashes in England and they have a return Ashes series very shortly in Australia. The ideal preparation would have been as Ian suggests here to prepare for this return Ashes series. And very rightly this Indian tour defeats this purpose. When England are already in Australia, the Aussies would be playing a pretty meaningless series in India handing out the advantage to England. Very rightly this would be a meaningless ODI series to please BCCI and we fail to see this as we are Indians !!!!

  • spindizzy on October 6, 2013, 11:06 GMT

    Chappell is completely correct, this is a meaningless, pointless distraction. Sutherland was just demonstrating his finance-fuelled incompetence as usual. They've fallen into the trap of thinking that money is everything, not just one aspect of running the ACB. India will probably win but nobody outside India will even notice this series.

  • on October 6, 2013, 10:53 GMT

    What i was kinda hoping for is that CA wood pull a BCCI & cancel this Indian our so they could arrange a home test series for Brad Haddin's 50th test match. mayb they could get a 2 test series vs Zimbabwe or Bangladesh, a bit of a moral boost before the Ashes. granted Zimbabwe just beat Pakistan so u never no what couldve happened. Then WI & India could play 3 Tests & 3 odis leaving enough time to get to South Africa for 3 tests & mayb 4 odis

  • on October 6, 2013, 10:40 GMT

    no matter the teams 7 odi matches is overkill. and then the timing is not ideal either. Australia have lost their last 3 Ashes series 8-2 and they are staring down the barrel @ a 4th loss especially if Clarke Pattinson & Harris dont recover from their injuries in time. What CA should be trying to do is prep their best players for Test cricket which is not being helped by going to India, to play limited overs cricket @ that. England quite possibly will be going into Brisbane more ready than Australia even though they r the touring team.

  • Ragav999 on October 6, 2013, 10:21 GMT

    @cnksnk: Your points make a lot of sense.

  • on October 6, 2013, 10:00 GMT

    Just one word, 'HODGE'.

  • ODI_BestFormOfCricket on October 6, 2013, 9:35 GMT

    back to back ashes is meaningless, australia emerging players might play well and give more options for selection

  • PFEL on October 6, 2013, 9:24 GMT

    Don't worry Ian, they will be picked on the 2 or 3 rounds of Shield games, not the ODI matches.

  • KapilsDevils1983 on October 6, 2013, 9:23 GMT

    Oh yes, why don't we simply play all cricket that is only tests, or look at all other cricket from the point of view of preparing us for tests (!)

    Some older writers need to remember that a vast majority of the cricket population actually enjoy ODIs and T20Is and tests are actually the least popular format. The India-Aus series is a series in itself and Chappell is wrong to look at if from the point of view of preparing / or selecting a test squad.

    This ODI series is between the two best sides, with terrific limited overs cricketers (Dhoni, Watson, Johnson, Kohli) in a country where you almost always get packed out stadiums for limited overs cricket!! -- should be an electrifying contest!

  • calcu on October 6, 2013, 9:22 GMT

    I dont agree with this article . The tour of India consists of a young aussie side who are going to decide the future of cricket australia whereas ashes is going to be contested by a expierenced Aus side. The tour of India is meaningful and is going to be a competetive one and Aus is going to have a good chance of winning it.

  • on October 6, 2013, 8:57 GMT

    @Ken McCarron : George Bailey is also very ordinary in List A matches - he bats much better in ODIs, as his stats testify. Any player who can lift his game for Australia in one format can do so in another. And his first class batting average is better than those of Shaun Marsh, Quiney and Henriques who have gotten test berths ahead of him anyway.

  • on October 6, 2013, 8:40 GMT

    When people mention Voges, Bailey and Ferguson as potential Test batsmen I laugh. They are very, very ordinary in the longer form of the game.....

  • on October 6, 2013, 8:34 GMT

    @Rohit Ramesh - No it doesn't make any sense for Aus to play Ind right now. They could have had a shorter series against lets say NZ at home for all that mattered. This is a bad idea to host 7 ODIs right now. I'd rather see 3 tests, 3 ODIs and a couple of t20s against SA in SA.

  • cnksnk on October 6, 2013, 8:08 GMT

    Chappell usually makes a lot of sense. However i am struggling to find the basic thread of this essay. Aussies are focussed on the Ashes which is understandable. However some one could have written a perfectly positive article on the same situation. It could go like - how while the core test squad is concentrating on the ashes , australia is sending a bunch of youngsters , who anyway are not ready for the tests squad, to India. The tour will give the players a) exposure to play spinners and also experience to play in india. B) how anyway with ghe the exception of Clarke and Watto most of the others in the test team would not have made the ODI squad C) how by playing the world no 1 ODI team, the australian team is engaging with the best and a good performance will take the team to the No 1 spot and D) how australia is n fact getting 2 teams battle ready. And who knows the best performer will also fill in the no 6 slot. Writing is also a state of the mind !!!!

  • on October 6, 2013, 7:45 GMT

    I've got four words in response to this article: George. Bailey. Adam. Voges.

  • on October 6, 2013, 7:42 GMT

    Oh come on, it is a meaningless series for sure. Just because India has a good chance of winning against an Aussie side they lost their last 2 home series 2 (2-4 at that, never mind the 1-0 win in 2010), you can't say that people are looking forward to this series. This 7 match series will be as pointless as the WI tour of India (which cuts short the SA tour) or God forbid, another Sri Lankan tour of India as a replacement for the SA series. Till about 2-3 years back, only BCCI used to be bad at tour planning, now the bug seems to have caught everyone except England.

  • on October 6, 2013, 7:29 GMT

    it is rendered meaningless because there is not even an outside chance that australia will win it.

  • on October 6, 2013, 7:17 GMT

    That's a joke Rohit. Win/lose/draw no one cares about this series. This team they are sending are all bit players, The team is so unsettles they have about 20 players all vying for the 11. They will mix and match for 7 games because no one cares about the results. If it was against a lesser team i would send Aus A or U19 side lol

  • Alexk400 on October 6, 2013, 6:57 GMT

    I believe better incentive (money) for each batting marks (50s, 100s) will make player not throw away wicket. It may help young players curtail down extravagant shots and play purposefully. For any team to post score , you need franchise player ( production type player ) and other role players. What aussies lacks now is a batsman who produces consistent scores. Problem with australia setup is its captain clarke. He is the source of all the bad feeling in the team.

  • on October 6, 2013, 6:55 GMT

    If someone like a George Bailey can maintain his good ODI form, I think he should be considered for a test place. Bailey's FC record may not be demanding straight forward selection, but he has done well at international level against good attacks, and has a good temperament. I believe he would be better than the likes of Phillip Hughes and Khawaja. A lineup of Warner Rogers Watson Clarke Smith Bailey Haddin Faulkner Siddle Harris Lyon might be able to give England a good fight. If they aren't picking Bailey at 6, I would say pick Faulkner at 7 with Haddin up to 6 and pick Starc at 8.

  • jimbond on October 6, 2013, 6:47 GMT

    Possibly not number 6, but Maddison could be a potential replacement for Shane Watson in the opening slot.

  • tanstell87 on October 6, 2013, 5:46 GMT

    dont agree with Chapelli Sir...when India tours Australia they play the whole tour(4 tests +2 T20Is + 8-11 ODIs)....why doesn't Cricket Australia do that...why play tests first and ODIs later in the year..so this would not happen in first place...& Callum Ferguson & George Bailey are contenders for that number 6 spot in Aussie test line up...

  • gsingh7 on October 6, 2013, 5:20 GMT

    calling odi series vs best odi team as pointless seems outlandish. if australia win 5-2 then they wud be top odi side in world and this will surely lift their moral for 'all important' ashes series, nevermind that england won last 3 ashes in a row.another ashes loss will slide aus to 7th or 6th rank in test rankings.on the other hand ,considering current form of indian players and dwindling standards in aus cricket 7-0 loss to indians is not out of question.. this will surely put a dent in aus confidence before they face england.

  • on October 6, 2013, 5:20 GMT

    Judging on this, it sounds like Chappel doesn't want to go to India bcoz he is scared that India will thrash them. I don' t think he would complaining about a schedule if it was against a weaker team, but now that defeat is obvious he is trying to give an excuse saying it is meaningless.

  • on October 6, 2013, 5:20 GMT

    Judging on this, it sounds like Chappel doesn't want to go to India bcoz he is scared that India will thrash them. I don' t think he would complaining about a schedule if it was against a weaker team, but now that defeat is obvious he is trying to give an excuse saying it is meaningless.

  • gsingh7 on October 6, 2013, 5:20 GMT

    calling odi series vs best odi team as pointless seems outlandish. if australia win 5-2 then they wud be top odi side in world and this will surely lift their moral for 'all important' ashes series, nevermind that england won last 3 ashes in a row.another ashes loss will slide aus to 7th or 6th rank in test rankings.on the other hand ,considering current form of indian players and dwindling standards in aus cricket 7-0 loss to indians is not out of question.. this will surely put a dent in aus confidence before they face england.

  • tanstell87 on October 6, 2013, 5:46 GMT

    dont agree with Chapelli Sir...when India tours Australia they play the whole tour(4 tests +2 T20Is + 8-11 ODIs)....why doesn't Cricket Australia do that...why play tests first and ODIs later in the year..so this would not happen in first place...& Callum Ferguson & George Bailey are contenders for that number 6 spot in Aussie test line up...

  • jimbond on October 6, 2013, 6:47 GMT

    Possibly not number 6, but Maddison could be a potential replacement for Shane Watson in the opening slot.

  • on October 6, 2013, 6:55 GMT

    If someone like a George Bailey can maintain his good ODI form, I think he should be considered for a test place. Bailey's FC record may not be demanding straight forward selection, but he has done well at international level against good attacks, and has a good temperament. I believe he would be better than the likes of Phillip Hughes and Khawaja. A lineup of Warner Rogers Watson Clarke Smith Bailey Haddin Faulkner Siddle Harris Lyon might be able to give England a good fight. If they aren't picking Bailey at 6, I would say pick Faulkner at 7 with Haddin up to 6 and pick Starc at 8.

  • Alexk400 on October 6, 2013, 6:57 GMT

    I believe better incentive (money) for each batting marks (50s, 100s) will make player not throw away wicket. It may help young players curtail down extravagant shots and play purposefully. For any team to post score , you need franchise player ( production type player ) and other role players. What aussies lacks now is a batsman who produces consistent scores. Problem with australia setup is its captain clarke. He is the source of all the bad feeling in the team.

  • on October 6, 2013, 7:17 GMT

    That's a joke Rohit. Win/lose/draw no one cares about this series. This team they are sending are all bit players, The team is so unsettles they have about 20 players all vying for the 11. They will mix and match for 7 games because no one cares about the results. If it was against a lesser team i would send Aus A or U19 side lol

  • on October 6, 2013, 7:29 GMT

    it is rendered meaningless because there is not even an outside chance that australia will win it.

  • on October 6, 2013, 7:42 GMT

    Oh come on, it is a meaningless series for sure. Just because India has a good chance of winning against an Aussie side they lost their last 2 home series 2 (2-4 at that, never mind the 1-0 win in 2010), you can't say that people are looking forward to this series. This 7 match series will be as pointless as the WI tour of India (which cuts short the SA tour) or God forbid, another Sri Lankan tour of India as a replacement for the SA series. Till about 2-3 years back, only BCCI used to be bad at tour planning, now the bug seems to have caught everyone except England.

  • on October 6, 2013, 7:45 GMT

    I've got four words in response to this article: George. Bailey. Adam. Voges.