November 25, 2013

The quiet goodbyes

After the emotion of Sachin Tendulkar's last Test, a look at some farewells that didn't go quite so well
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Don Bradman
Possibly cricket's most famous anticlimax came at The Oval in 1948, when Don Bradman went out to bat for what, in all probability, was his last Test innings (England had just been skittled for 52, so an Australian second innings already seemed unlikely). Bradman needed only four runs to cement a Test average of 100, but was bowled by his second ball, from the Warwickshire legspinner Eric Hollies. The Don was left with an average of 99.94 - which ironically over the years has become even more famous than if he'd managed three figures.

George Headley
West Indies' first great batsman was so good he was dubbed "the black Bradman" by some. And before the Second World War he lived up to that, averaging 66.71 and carrying his side's batting on his shoulders, to the extent that "Atlas" was another nickname. But after the war, ageing and prone to injury, Headley managed only three further Tests, the last of them at home in Jamaica in 1953-54, when he twice fell cheaply to the England spinner Tony Lock, who was also called for throwing during the match.

Keith Stackpole
The Test career of the popular Australian opener Keith Stackpole came to a quiet end in New Zealand in 1973-74, with a pair in Auckland. That included being out to the first ball of the match, a high full-toss from Richard Hadlee: "I only saw it a yard away from my head," wrote Stacky. "I pulled out of the way, but the ball flicked the end of the bat and flew to first slip. Maybe it was the first time in Test cricket that a fellow was out first ball without the ball ever touching the ground!"

Rahul Dravid
Aged 38, Rahul Dravid was India's batting star as they slipped to a disappointing 4-0 defeat in England in 2011. He made three centuries, including one while carrying his bat at The Oval. He was tempted to call it a day then... but there was still a job to do in Australia. Sadly, conditions there were less to his liking, and Dravid managed a solitary fifty - and four scores of ten and under - as another embarrassing whitewash loomed. One of the longest and most successful of Test careers had come to a quiet end.

WG Grace
WG Grace almost invented the modern game of cricket: he was the first batsman to play forward and back with equal assurance, in the way which is familiar even now. He rewrote the record books, too. But by 1899 he was 50, and somewhat thicker around the waist than before. After the first match of that year's Ashes series, in which he scored 28 and 1, Grace stepped down, mainly because the ground was getting a bit too far away and showing up his fielding. "It's all over, Jacker," he told his team-mate Stanley Jackson mournfully, "I shan't play again."

Ricky Ponting
He was probably Australia's best batsman since Bradman, but eventually time caught up with Ricky Ponting. A glittering international career came to a subdued end in 2012-13 in the home series against South Africa - only 32 runs in five innings, including a rather sad double of 4 and 8 in Perth in the final Test after announcing his retirement. Ponting still finished with a Test average nudging 52.

Andrew Strauss
No one except his nearest and dearest knew Andrew Strauss was going to call it a day after the 2012 Lord's Test against South Africa - his 100th Test match, and 50th as captain. It wasn't quite the perfect ending, though, out cheaply twice as England slipped to defeat in the match and the series, and surrendered their hard-earned No. 1 Test ranking.

Jeff Thomson
Just possibly the fastest bowler who ever lived, Jeff Thomson terrorised batsmen - particularly Poms - in the 1970s. By 1985, though, he had slowed down a bit, and was a late call-up for the 1985 Ashes series after some original choices defected to a rebel tour of South Africa. Late-era Thommo was not so scary: he played only in the first Test (2 for 166 and 0 for 8) and the fifth (1 for 101), and is probably best-remembered for flicking a V-sign at the crowd during that final match at Edgbaston. Still, his wicket there gave him exactly 200 in Tests, 100 of them against England.

Javed Miandad
The long international career of Javed Miandad, which started as a teenager in the inaugural World Cup in 1975, ended in the sixth World Cup in 1996, with a quarter-final defeat to arch-rivals India in Bangalore. Frustrated at batting out of position at No. 6 (and probably even more frustrated at the dying of the light), Miandad scrapped his way to 38 before his run-out virtually sealed the game for India. He walked off with more than 16,000 international runs, and a Test average above 52.

Javagal Srinath
One of India's finest fast bowlers, Javagal Srinath finished up with more than 550 wickets in international cricket. What turned out to be his last match was the 2003 World Cup final - but even the genial Srinath was hard-pressed to crack a smile as Australia ran amok in Johannesburg. They made 359 for 2 - Ricky Ponting 140 not out - and Srinath's ten overs disappeared for 87.

Geraint Jones
Best remembered now as the man who took the catch that ended the 2005 Edgbaston epic, Geraint Jones had a solid career for England, and was an automatic choice between his debut in the West Indies in 2003-04 and the start of the 2006-07 Ashes tour. The vultures were hovering, though, as England slipped to defeat after defeat with Jones contributing little with the bat. Before the third Test, his 34th, Jones had never been out for a duck in 51 innings: but in Perth he bagged a pair. And then he was dropped, and never played again.

Steven Lynch is the editor of the Wisden Guide to International Cricket 2013

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • Beertjie on November 28, 2013, 6:14 GMT

    For me, Malcolm Marshall's quiet departure at the Oval in '91 stands out. Gooch was his one and only wicket in his final 5 overs. 8 years later he was gone for good.

  • themagpie on November 28, 2013, 3:59 GMT

    It may not be all finished for Gariant Jones. If PNG beat Hong Kong tonight, Jones will be at the T20 World Cup next year.

  • CricketChat on November 27, 2013, 2:02 GMT

    Now that Sachin retired finally, can we leave him alone and follow those actively playing? I feel there is no need to compare everything within his context. Other greats deserve their space under the sun for their contributions.

  • EdwinD on November 26, 2013, 17:43 GMT

    Ian Botham's career also finished with a damp squib against the Pakistan side of '92....

  • on November 26, 2013, 17:18 GMT

    Quiet Good bye needs clarification.. Don's was not a quite one in terms of fanfare (atleast for those times).. If only by performance, there are many more such great players..

    Suddenly remembering.. Why VVS not in this list? Likes of VVS, Boucher are missing while non-descript Geraint Jones finds a place.. Strange..

  • Omarrz on November 26, 2013, 17:11 GMT

    Geraint Jones? Seriously? He was never a star player. Shoaib Akhter, MoYo and Inzi deserve to be in that list!

  • Pak_suleman on November 26, 2013, 15:26 GMT

    Shoaib Akhtar and Muhammad Yousaf deserve to be in that list

  • on November 26, 2013, 5:57 GMT

    As usual, some miss out. But then this happens. Srinath is only described as one of India's bests, isn't he? Jones is primarily WK; are keepers lesser players than batters? That said, his inclusion at Boucher's expense is highly unwarranted. The association with number11 on such topics seems a bit too obsessive with sports enthusiasts. It tends to draw even more skepticism when 8 batters, 2 bowlers and one WK are seen involved. Okay, Tendulkar's exit was the noisiest. Is that the point being discussed at all? How come the departure of a player who averaged 70+ in his last series and made 173* in his penultimate test toward a record chasing would be quiet while a struggling player's not?

  • on November 26, 2013, 2:56 GMT

    Hummmmm.....i think it needs The quiet goodbyes part 2

    or they knew it is their last but The quiet goodbyes

  • silly.point on November 26, 2013, 2:06 GMT

    @BoonBoom The author writes.. one of INDIA's finest fast bowlers.. do you dispute that?

  • Beertjie on November 28, 2013, 6:14 GMT

    For me, Malcolm Marshall's quiet departure at the Oval in '91 stands out. Gooch was his one and only wicket in his final 5 overs. 8 years later he was gone for good.

  • themagpie on November 28, 2013, 3:59 GMT

    It may not be all finished for Gariant Jones. If PNG beat Hong Kong tonight, Jones will be at the T20 World Cup next year.

  • CricketChat on November 27, 2013, 2:02 GMT

    Now that Sachin retired finally, can we leave him alone and follow those actively playing? I feel there is no need to compare everything within his context. Other greats deserve their space under the sun for their contributions.

  • EdwinD on November 26, 2013, 17:43 GMT

    Ian Botham's career also finished with a damp squib against the Pakistan side of '92....

  • on November 26, 2013, 17:18 GMT

    Quiet Good bye needs clarification.. Don's was not a quite one in terms of fanfare (atleast for those times).. If only by performance, there are many more such great players..

    Suddenly remembering.. Why VVS not in this list? Likes of VVS, Boucher are missing while non-descript Geraint Jones finds a place.. Strange..

  • Omarrz on November 26, 2013, 17:11 GMT

    Geraint Jones? Seriously? He was never a star player. Shoaib Akhter, MoYo and Inzi deserve to be in that list!

  • Pak_suleman on November 26, 2013, 15:26 GMT

    Shoaib Akhtar and Muhammad Yousaf deserve to be in that list

  • on November 26, 2013, 5:57 GMT

    As usual, some miss out. But then this happens. Srinath is only described as one of India's bests, isn't he? Jones is primarily WK; are keepers lesser players than batters? That said, his inclusion at Boucher's expense is highly unwarranted. The association with number11 on such topics seems a bit too obsessive with sports enthusiasts. It tends to draw even more skepticism when 8 batters, 2 bowlers and one WK are seen involved. Okay, Tendulkar's exit was the noisiest. Is that the point being discussed at all? How come the departure of a player who averaged 70+ in his last series and made 173* in his penultimate test toward a record chasing would be quiet while a struggling player's not?

  • on November 26, 2013, 2:56 GMT

    Hummmmm.....i think it needs The quiet goodbyes part 2

    or they knew it is their last but The quiet goodbyes

  • silly.point on November 26, 2013, 2:06 GMT

    @BoonBoom The author writes.. one of INDIA's finest fast bowlers.. do you dispute that?

  • on November 26, 2013, 1:57 GMT

    There will always be a difference between Sachin Tendulkar and the other LEGENDS who retired. They have never engineered a personal Test Series for their farewell like he did. I have never taken Tendulkar as a team man. Dravid has been a far better player.

  • ketaann on November 26, 2013, 1:29 GMT

    stephen fleming,astle,bond,ganguly, lara many missing

  • Midnight1131 on November 26, 2013, 0:57 GMT

    I still can't believe that Don Bradman was out for 0 in his last test. Just 4 runs...

  • harish-cricket-mad on November 25, 2013, 22:33 GMT

    @ BoonBoom---read the article carefully - it says Srinath was one of India.s finest- not the world' s finest. Be great if you could get the facts right before making wild accusations

  • Tyrion_1645 on November 25, 2013, 21:42 GMT

    The most surprising thing I first noticed about this article is the exclusion of the great Brian Charles Lara. With the likes of Greaint Jones being included in the list, how can one possibly exclude Brian Lara ?

    I honestly believe that Lara never had the proper ending to his International, or rather, his cricket career which he deserved. He ended his test career without anyone realizing, or even having the slightest of inkling, that it would be his final test, which happens to be against Pakistan -- Which I vividly remember because of the attacking and dominant double century he scored in that series. Even in his final ODI in the world cup 2007 -- which he did announce prior to the match -- ended rather unexpectedly by being run out by Marlon Samuels.

    Such a great batsman who always came in to bat with loads of pressure because of the abysmal batting by his team mates and at times, would one handedly save his team, if not securing a win for them, but by mitigating the loss margin.

  • on November 25, 2013, 21:11 GMT

    @bublu bhuyan @,Prabhakar Naidu : of course guys ponting was part best cricket team ever played.but sachin was also part of best batting side for 3/4 th of his carrier (DADA ,AZHAR,JAMMY,VVS).sachin was at his peak during entire 1990's.but india was blown away in overseas during that period .the magic happened only when DADA took over the captaincy then india started winning in AUSTRALIA ,UK AND WINDIEs main weapon for that was dravid.i cant remember any player whos was at peak during retirement EXCEPT DADA. more THAN 2000 test runs in his last 22 months... but no one talked about DAda. dravid ,azhar and vvs was not even given a farewll test ,but sachin scored last 100 in jan 2010.if sachin was playing fot aussies he would sacked after 2004 tennis elbow injury like mark waugh ,beven etc he would not even reached 10K test runs...ponting scored all these runs as a captain , but sachin was shying away from leadership unlike DADA who gave up his openeing slot for teams cause

  • on November 25, 2013, 21:00 GMT

    So Sachin's farewell went well? Full of emotion by a billion Indians, but did it really go well? And if that fits within your definition of a good farewell, I can think of a few of these players whose final matches would have been great as well. From my generation, Dravid and Ponting would certainly have scored at least a half century if they were 'provided' a farewell series against weak opposition. Ponting went out against the SA bowling attack and Dravid went out against Aus IN Australia. And both of these men might have extended their careers if they were given the long rope that Sachin was. Sachin lost it after 2011, but he was allowed to stay on because he's Sachin Tendulkar.

  • Jonathan_E on November 25, 2013, 18:34 GMT

    Botham's later years were among the saddest. His last test century and his last five-for came on the Australian tour of 1986-87. After that even the "adequate" performances were few and far between... his final test 50 in 1987 being an all-day rearguard action against Qadir and Tauseef: injured in 1988, dropped for two years from mid-1989 to 1991. Returning in 1991, taking a wicket in his first over (again), getting his best ODI bowling analysis but picking up an injury: coming back for the 5th test, crashing on to his stumps while trying to hook Curtly Ambrose, but taking 3 sharp slip catches and hitting the winning runs, missing most of the winter tour of NZ but arriving for the World Cup, being England's best bowler and decent pinch-hitter but failing in the final, given out caught to a ball he didn't hit: then finally being hustled out by Waqar and Wasim in 1992, unable to cope with the pace any longer.

  • xylo on November 25, 2013, 18:27 GMT

    I would still rank Dravid's exit to be way more graceful than Sachin Tendulkar's. Dravid realized that age was catching up with him, and called it a day - as simple as that. Compare this to Sachin's drag since 2011 in which his only century was in an ODI against Bangladesh that dragged down the team leading to a loss. The end came with a staged test series involving the weakest possible opponents.

  • on November 25, 2013, 18:23 GMT

    Jason gillespie? 200 and then dropped :|

  • on November 25, 2013, 18:11 GMT

    @BoonBoon...You are certainly a Brit. You might have not seen the whole list in which Geraint Jones of your overhyped English team also also featured. Forget being a good batsman, do you even consider him even a batsman?. Srinath in his hey days was a lethal opening fast bowler. He was the leader of a whole generation of fast bowler in India.

  • on November 25, 2013, 17:53 GMT

    one name is missing Kapil Dev.

  • BoonBoom on November 25, 2013, 17:39 GMT

    Come on.... Srinath was a good bowler but NOT one of the finest as you described. I know India is a big market for cricket but at least I dont expect from you to distort the fact due to business reasons and please Indian fans.... Be honest with your writing. Look at his stats....do they qualify to label him as one of the finest??

  • on November 25, 2013, 17:27 GMT

    Steve, are you implying that, contrary to the players in your compilation, Tendulkar's career concluded with a bang? I agree to some of the ironies mentioned in the conclusions (last innings or last seasons) of the greats in the list, but am disappointed to read the wrong premises of this piece. Please do not forget (however painful it might be for you and the 'Sachin fans') that SRT's career not only ended on a damp squib, but also under dubious circumstances. 'Damp Squib' as he was coming out one of his most unsuccessful (and largely self-serving) season of low scores (his extended run in the team was purely a largesse accorded to him due to his name) and 'Dubious' since he used all his clout with BCCI to engineer for himself a 'stage managed' farewell even at the cost of his team-mates playing a competitive series elsewhere. Was that 'Sport' that we watched when people were going ga-ga over SRT's 'farewell tour'? And hence was that really a big-bang farewell?

  • USIndianFan on November 25, 2013, 17:16 GMT

    Hmm. Lot of folks missing here. Should have done a decade-by-decade listing.

    e.g. 70's 1. Gavaskar, Vishwanath, Wadekar, Sardesai, Pataudi and Mohinder Amarnath from the late 60's/70's. Also the spin quartet 2. Cowdrey, Tony Greig, Geoff Boycott, David Gower, Ian Botham, Bob Willis, Graham Gooch, Dennis Amis 3. The Chapell brothers, Lille and Thompson, Rod Marsh, Allan Border

    The list goes on. Maybe cricinfo can do a series?

  • on November 25, 2013, 16:58 GMT

    Don Bradman, Dravid, Miandad, Ponting, W G Grace... Geriant Jones?!!!!!

  • on November 25, 2013, 16:49 GMT

    These people atleast deserved as much as sachin or atleast half of of what sachin got?

  • on November 25, 2013, 15:52 GMT

    Is it quiet goodbyes, or ones that ended poorly? Seems the headline doesn't match the story. For quiet retirements, hard to beat Damien Martyn. After the famous Adelaide test in 06/07 he just vanished. Series had yet to be won by that stage and he decided on a whim and with absolutely no fanfare to walk away.

  • gkshyam on November 25, 2013, 15:44 GMT

    Another tragic end was that of Anil Kumble's ODI career. Jumbo had announced prior to the 2007 World Cup, that it would be his last ODI series. India played just 3 matches in that tournament - 1st against Bangladesh, in which India was beaten (Jumbo wasn't picked in the playing XI); 2nd against Bermuda, in which India crushed the opponents by a massive 257-run margin, with Jumbo scalping 3-38; & the 3rd game against Sri Lanka, in which Jumbo was dropped unceremoniously for no reason - and India ended up losing the match, and crashing out of the World Cup. Ironically, Jumbo never 'got to play' his last ODI.... if it can be said so. He still finished as India's best-ever bowler in ODIs; but for such a legend to have such an end to his ODI career, makes it all the more tragic...!

  • vvbr on November 25, 2013, 15:40 GMT

    @Bublu Bhuyan The article never said Ponting the greatest after Bradman. The article starkly misses Mark Waugh, Saeed Anwar, Saqlain Mushtaq, Wasim Akram, McGrath, Jayasuriya, Bevan

  • on November 25, 2013, 14:18 GMT

    What about Brian Charles Lara?

  • on November 25, 2013, 13:51 GMT

    @RAJ_SHARMA_CRICKETCRAZE - Rubbish! What you quoted was from Wikipedia, where anyone can edit anything. WISDEN, in 2002, rated Bradman the greatest, then Sachin, then Viv and then Sobers as Test batsmen.

  • on November 25, 2013, 13:48 GMT

    wonder why Geraint Jones came in the list...

  • CricketChat on November 25, 2013, 13:45 GMT

    Should definitely mention the spin quartet from India. After 1978 Pak tour, they all faded away as was GR Visvanath after 1983 tour of Pak. Until that point they all were considered indispensable.

  • ashankar on November 25, 2013, 13:25 GMT

    EspnCrickinfoX1 clearly cant accomodate more than 11 guys. Please relax. It is tough to get eveyone in this great game of cricket to be here. But all that you have mentioned in your comments are no doubt - GREATS!!!

  • RAJ_SHARMA_CRICKETCRAZE on November 25, 2013, 12:47 GMT

    RAHUL DRAVID @ As of October 2012, Dravid is the third-highest run scorer in Test cricket, after Sachin Tendulkar and Ricky Ponting, and is only the second Indian cricketer, after Tendulkar to score 10,000 runs both in Tests and in ODIs.[7][8] Wisden ranked him the third greatest Test batsman of all time, after Don Bradman and Tendulkar. In April 2009,

  • on November 25, 2013, 12:43 GMT

    lot of great Indians of yester years of 40 s. and 50 s come to mind Two Vijays and Lala

  • on November 25, 2013, 12:15 GMT

    I am surprised that the mention of VVS Laxman did not make to the list. Definitely one of the modern day greats for his penchant to helping his side chase down tricky totals on more occasions than one. Laxman, who more often than not, was forced to battle on in the company of tailenders have been India's savior on numerous occasions who definitely needed a fitting farewell.

  • on November 25, 2013, 11:46 GMT

    Inzimam ul Haq just needed 17 runs in his last test (two Innings) to become top scorer Pakistani batsman. He fails. Wasim Akram , arguable best left hand seamer ever and Waqar younis both were able to win against only Minnows in their last WC.

  • J751 on November 25, 2013, 11:11 GMT

    The sight of Inzamam ul Haq walking to the pavilion after playing his last ODI in the 2007 World Cup was poignant.He was in tears.He had played his last ODI,Pakistan were out of the World Cup and their coach Bob Woolmer was dead.In his last Test a few months later,Inzamam again failed, narrowly missing Javed Miandad's record for most runs for Pakistan in Test cricket.

  • on November 25, 2013, 11:10 GMT

    Ahmed Omair you are right in mentioning Wasim, Waqar but i have doubts about inzi beoz he was given a special chance and PCB Chairman was special guest on ocassion

    Manoj Karunanidhi i will take 108 wins but Sachin i love.....

  • on November 25, 2013, 10:54 GMT

    What about Inzamam Ul Haq. His was probably the most famous after Bradman when he needed 3 runs to beat Miandads Pakistan record and failed to do so.

  • J751 on November 25, 2013, 10:52 GMT

    Majid Khan ended his career with a duck.Incidentally,his Test career had also begun with a duck.

  • soaf on November 25, 2013, 10:51 GMT

    shaoaib akhtar also comes in mind.the guy had won test matches single handedly on foreign soils. it was such feats which i thought even the indian god couldnt be able to do soi in his 24 years career.got the beating of his life time from ross taylor in wc game and after that didnt even get a farewell match from pcb.

  • on November 25, 2013, 10:28 GMT

    What about Mark Taylor and Allan Border?

  • smudgeon on November 25, 2013, 10:27 GMT

    yujilop, I was surprised to see he was still going - as a specialist batsman, no less! I recalled he was born in PNG, good to see him offering his experience to a developing team and giving them an opportunity to take things to the next level.

  • on November 25, 2013, 10:24 GMT

    I would always include Wasim Akram in this list.

  • smudgeon on November 25, 2013, 10:21 GMT

    As a huge fan of Dravid, it was a sad way to see his career end - particularly after his amazing lone hand in the England series not so long before he retired. I guess he knew his time had come.

  • Ali_Chaudhary on November 25, 2013, 9:53 GMT

    I think Wasim´s Exit was the very poor. He asked PCB for a home game vs Bangladesh but was denied.

  • on November 25, 2013, 9:44 GMT

    @manoj gangulian. I certainly agree with you that BCCI went a little over the board to give Tendulkar a larger-than-the-game farewell. Most of it was highly unnecessary. But the fact that Ponting was a part of 108 test wins( to Tendulkar's 72) was more a credit to the entire Australian team and not just Ponting himself. The point I am trying to make is there are quite a few of those 108 test wins where Ponting dint contribute at all but the rest of the team(Hayden, Gilchrist, Warne, Mcgrath and all) was good enough. Same hold's good for Tendulkar's 72 wins too (Dravid, Laxman, Kumble and Zaheer being responsible for a lion's share of those wins). In saying so, I am not taking any credit away the two legendary batsmen. I am just saying that the number of wins they are a part of in not a right measure of a player's greatness. Its like saying Tom Moody is a better One-Day all rounder than Jacques Kallis because Moody has won two world cups and Kallis won none.

  • on November 25, 2013, 9:37 GMT

    @Manoj Karunanidhi Gangulian - You conveniently ignored the small fact that Sachin played in a relatively weak team while Ponting played in the greatest Test team ever.

  • on November 25, 2013, 9:35 GMT

    @Arjun Sukumaran - Don't spread lies. WISDEN doesn't even rate Dravid among the top 20 Test batsman ever. According to WISDEN, Bradman is the best Test batsman, Sachin second and Viv third.

  • on November 25, 2013, 9:26 GMT

    What about Inzi, Wasim, Waqar?

  • on November 25, 2013, 8:59 GMT

    What about Jayasurya. Most ungraceful non-exits ever for any legend

  • on November 25, 2013, 8:55 GMT

    Why Dada is not even considered !!!!

  • deoshatwar on November 25, 2013, 8:38 GMT

    VVS Lxman's omission is striking here so is Kapil's and Ganguly's.

  • Gopalakrishna on November 25, 2013, 8:33 GMT

    How can one forget the batting mastero - Gundappa Ranganath Viswanath ? HR Gopala Krishna - Cricket Statistician - Bangalore

  • on November 25, 2013, 8:16 GMT

    every one got good farewell ,,ganguly ,ponting dravid retired for the cause of team to give chance to youngsters...but sachin's was a overhyped one ..the last series was fixedand designed for sachins century against worst team in a flat track...but GOD dint let that team..may be they should invited bangladesh or zimbabawe...he just a record holder not a best cricketer...does any one knew PONTING has 108 test wins in just 168 matches ...sachin has only 72...which is beter 108 wins or 51 centuries ?

  • on November 25, 2013, 7:00 GMT

    rahul dravid did only one thing wrong he played in the sachin era. wisdon ranked him the third best test batsman of all time. his whole carier went un noticed. he always been under the shadow of sachin. i reckon if the best test team is going to be slected. for batting at no3 dravid or ponting is the right choice....!

  • on November 25, 2013, 6:50 GMT

    What about VVS Laxman? One cant leave him out from this list.

  • mk49_van on November 25, 2013, 6:23 GMT

    @ Sabih Raza - did you mean "Miandad - the most talented crooked cricketer without a doubt"? That one word makes all the difference.

  • riaz.m on November 25, 2013, 6:14 GMT

    David Gower and Ian Botham are two who deserved better farewells. Botham simply was his own victim by staying around in test match cricket too long,his last few tests were spread over 5 years,while Gower was a victim of Gooch's preference for hard work over flair so that Dermot Reeve and Chris Cowdrey made the tour to India but Gower didn't. Great shame as Gower still had 2/3 good years ahead of him.

  • ReverseSweepRhino on November 25, 2013, 5:38 GMT

    I remember seeing Geraint Jones play just last week, thank you... And his team is still with a (slim) chance to qualify tor the World T20.

    While his games for PNG don't currently qualify as full International matches, you can't declare his international career dead just yet. Especially when his team is also present in the 2014 World Cup Qualifiers.

  • Sidhartha_Cricket on November 25, 2013, 5:27 GMT

    I do not remember Kapil Dev getting a proper farewell

  • on November 25, 2013, 5:07 GMT

    Even Viv Richards got a rather subdued farewell considering his popularity. The same holds true for Lara too, who had a rather quiet farewell.

  • akpy on November 25, 2013, 4:52 GMT

    Destiny and karma...sachin deserved it but was also lucky enough to win all his last games in various formats and also WC, IPL, CLT20, ranji....

  • mravikiran on November 25, 2013, 4:49 GMT

    Sourav Ganguly should feature in this list.

  • left_arm_unorthodox on November 25, 2013, 4:47 GMT

    Allan Border comes to mind.

  • vaidyar on November 25, 2013, 4:31 GMT

    If we are looking at farewells purely in terms of performance, SRT should figure here. Close to 3 yrs without a single century, averaging under 30 over that time. Except for the noise from the BCCI, it was a quiet one in terms of runs scored or performance.

  • on November 25, 2013, 3:52 GMT

    Miandad - The most talented cricketer from the subcontinent without a doubt - how have we all forgotten? Its shameful.

  • TATTUs on November 25, 2013, 3:42 GMT

    I think Bradmans farewell was not a quite one [may be performance wise]. There was huge following of the match and there were people in the ground, even in tears.

  • Reggaecricket on November 25, 2013, 3:40 GMT

    Geraint Jones did play again after that Perth test for England, but he did for Papua New Guinea, where he was born!

  • on November 25, 2013, 3:03 GMT

    Ricky and Dravid deserved far better farewell but they did not get any and SRT on the other hand looked greater than the board BCCI. Amazing contrast how super heroes are far superior than regular greats.

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  • on November 25, 2013, 3:03 GMT

    Ricky and Dravid deserved far better farewell but they did not get any and SRT on the other hand looked greater than the board BCCI. Amazing contrast how super heroes are far superior than regular greats.

  • Reggaecricket on November 25, 2013, 3:40 GMT

    Geraint Jones did play again after that Perth test for England, but he did for Papua New Guinea, where he was born!

  • TATTUs on November 25, 2013, 3:42 GMT

    I think Bradmans farewell was not a quite one [may be performance wise]. There was huge following of the match and there were people in the ground, even in tears.

  • on November 25, 2013, 3:52 GMT

    Miandad - The most talented cricketer from the subcontinent without a doubt - how have we all forgotten? Its shameful.

  • vaidyar on November 25, 2013, 4:31 GMT

    If we are looking at farewells purely in terms of performance, SRT should figure here. Close to 3 yrs without a single century, averaging under 30 over that time. Except for the noise from the BCCI, it was a quiet one in terms of runs scored or performance.

  • left_arm_unorthodox on November 25, 2013, 4:47 GMT

    Allan Border comes to mind.

  • mravikiran on November 25, 2013, 4:49 GMT

    Sourav Ganguly should feature in this list.

  • akpy on November 25, 2013, 4:52 GMT

    Destiny and karma...sachin deserved it but was also lucky enough to win all his last games in various formats and also WC, IPL, CLT20, ranji....

  • on November 25, 2013, 5:07 GMT

    Even Viv Richards got a rather subdued farewell considering his popularity. The same holds true for Lara too, who had a rather quiet farewell.

  • Sidhartha_Cricket on November 25, 2013, 5:27 GMT

    I do not remember Kapil Dev getting a proper farewell