New Zealand v India, 2nd ODI, Hamilton

India down 2-0, lose No. 1 ranking

The Report by Sidharth Monga

January 22, 2014

Comments: 1080 | Text size: A | A

New Zealand 271 for 7 (Williamson 77, Taylor 57) in 42 overs beat India 277 for 9 (Kohli 78, Dhoni 56, Southee 4-72) in 41.3 overs by 15 runs (D/L)
Scorecard and ball-by-ball details


Kane Williamson drives through the off side, New Zealand v India, 2nd ODI, Hamilton, January 22, 2014
Kane Williamson scored his second fifty of the series © Getty Images
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New Zealand pushed India off the No. 1 position in ODIs with another clinical performance although India's middle order demanded that their bowlers stay at it till the end. Largely, though, the match followed the first ODI's script. Jesse Ryder went bang bang for too brief a while, Kane Williamson and Ross Taylor scored fifties to set up a final assault, Corey Anderson nearly blasted the fastest ODI fifty too, India had a big chase at hand and were kept alive by Virat Kohli and MS Dhoni but New Zealand kept producing timely wickets to pull India back every time they brought some semblance of parity to the chase.

There was supreme synergy in New Zealand's innings, cut down to 42 overs because of rain that arrived in the 34th over. When Martin Guptill took his time at the top, Jesse Ryder smacked 20 off 11, making sure New Zealand were under no pressure when the ball started gripping for spinners on a slow surface. Guptill overcame the slow start, and added 89 with Williamson in 15.3 overs. Williamson and Taylor then nicely set it up for big hitting, and when the rain arrived New Zealand had lost only two wickets, which meant they would get a big boost when the target would be readjusted. And then Anderson and Taylor went berserk in a 74-run partnership in 4.4 overs. During that period that proved to be the difference in the end, Anderson scored 44 off 17, holing out when he went for the fifty off the 17th, and Taylor took 26 off 11.

That brutal hitting was in direct contrast to the delightful batting of Williamson, who played the most difficult shot to play on a slow pitch, the back-foot drive on the up, with ease. He didn't play shots that left mouths agape, but found all the small gaps on the field. When he was set for a century - he was in the last game too - the rain arrived, and with only 8.4 overs to go on the comeback he perished trying to charge at Ravindra Jadeja in order to go over extra cover.

This wasn't exactly bad news for New Zealand. Williamson had batted superbly without violence, but now was some time for violence. And violence there was when Anderson and Taylor set themselves up to clear the short boundaries. Anderson hit a six over long-on, and two each over long-off and midwicket; Taylor preferred the gaps, hitting only seven fours and no sixes. India pulled New Zealand back with only 23 in the last 3.2 overs, but like in the first ODI it turned out to be too little and too late.

Especially with the way the opening exchange went after India had been asked to chase 297 in 42 overs. Kyle Mills, playing in the absence of Adam Milne, and Mitchell McClenaghan were spot on at the top of India's innings. They bowled with skill and accuracy, and with no loose balls available India had crawled to 21 for 0 with two reprieves when Tim Southee showed up in the eighth over. By now Shikhar Dhawan had become desperate and was bowled to an ugly swipe. In Southee's next, Rohit Sharma finally managed to get out, and the asking rate had already crossed eight.

Kohli, though, seemed to be playing on a different plane from the moment he on-drove Southee past mid-on for four. This was an uncharacteristic innings, though. Usually Kohli manages to keep the risks to the minimum even when going at the kind of high strike rates he does. Here, with his team-mates stuck at the other ends and the asking rate shooting through the roof, he had to play lower-percentage cricket, premeditate a little, but somehow the shots kept coming off. In presence of Ajinkya Rahane, Kohli turned the lost match into a fight, but that man McClenaghan came back again to dismiss Rahane with a sharp bouncer.

Dhoni promoted himself with 170 required in 18.2 overs, but soon saw Kohli get out to his aggression. Suresh Raina and Dhoni kept the chase going, but Brendon McCullum kept attacking, bowling out his main bowlers one by one. It paid dividends when Mills got Raina in his ninth over when most captains would have been worried about the fifth bowler's three overs remaining out of the last six and the asking rate within the batsmen's reach. The final blow, though, came with Anderson's offcutter getting Dhoni to sky a catch with 40 required off 17.

Further rain made sure India played only 41.3 overs in the chase, but by that time they had been well and truly beaten.

Sidharth Monga is an assistant editor at ESPNcricinfo

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Posted by   on (January 25, 2014, 5:07 GMT)

Its si very famous, Indians have no competitors in copy acts. I wonder have many excuses they produce!

Posted by mohsin9975 on (January 24, 2014, 15:01 GMT)

Laughable that some fans hav been raising ?? marks over D/L system now. Maybe its bcoz its for the 1st time that runs hav been added to the oppostion teams total after the rain-shortened innings and India hav lost by that added margin of runs. This shows that many of my indian fans do not watch cricket unless its india playing it. Many non-indians r under the impression that indians r cricket-crazy. Infact they watch only india matches/IPL, nothing else. I m very ashamed that we indians stoop to such low levels and become sore losers that we begin to challenge any rrule that goes against india in a particular match. First the DRS, then the 4-fielders outside circle, then the small uneven grounds, the rains, and now the age-old D/L system. All these rules r same for both teams, stop cribbing guys. India fought well, NZ played better & r 2-0 up. MSD cant select playing 11. Period

Posted by 11_Warrior on (January 24, 2014, 11:21 GMT)

India has just regained the No 1 team status.

Posted by Patties1984 on (January 24, 2014, 7:15 GMT)

India has many quality allrounders 1>Bipul Sharma 2>Rishi Dhavan 3>Rajat Bhatia 4>Sachin Rana 5>Surya Kumar Yadav 6>Laxmi Shukla 7>Irfan Pathan 8>SUmit Narwal 9>Stuart Binny 10>Ravi Jadeja. Top three need to be tried. They have all done excellent in Domestic.

Posted by Solid_Snake on (January 24, 2014, 6:33 GMT)

Lol..The fans of "Champ at home" are now demanding to kick out Rohit Sharma..The same guy who scored 200 recently is now asked to leave the team..Don't worry..He'll score another 200 once India plays at home :P

Posted by Naresh28 on (January 24, 2014, 6:30 GMT)

ITS GOOD FOR WORLD CRICKET that NZ has risen from almost no where to be a force to be reckoned with both in ODI and TESTS. They played well against WI as well just few days back.

Posted by Suresh.C on (January 24, 2014, 6:28 GMT)

Being an hardcore Indian fan feeling tired of the poor team selection match after match. Rohit and Ishant are a total misfit in the team. Rohit selection is done purley based on his IPL perfomance where he never fails anyway. He should be sacked forever just for his careless attitude toward the game which is very much visible. Ishanth should play only the test matches and not ODI and T20. Why is Pujara not in the team? He could be a perfect partner for Dhawan as an opener as he puts a price in on his wicket. And calling Jadeja an all rounder is a total crime and can't remember the last time he scored decent runs. May for the next 3 matches Ashwin to should be replaced with Amit Mishra, which might work. With this unit we might get knocked out of in the QF in the world cup in Aus.

Posted by neazahmed on (January 24, 2014, 5:13 GMT)

ooooo 2-0 so far ? bangladesh used to whitewash this team consecutively 2 series in a row....this is why india need to be putted into a different layer !!!

Posted by MelbourneMiracle on (January 24, 2014, 3:59 GMT)

There is a famous saying in Sri Lanka, "Corey pitata murrey" (murrey sounds as in Andy Murrey) which means, there's a new problem on top of the existing problem. I'd like to change that saying slightly as "Murrey pitata Corey." Murrey = McCullum + Taylor....and the Corey = Corey Anderson. When India landed NZ, the only problem they had in their mind was the power hitting of McCullum + Taylor = Murrey. But now they have another big headache on top of it. And that is Corey. So I'd like to say that India is in a "Murrey pitata Corey" situation at the moment.

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