Australia v England, 1st ODI, Melbourne January 12, 2014

Finch punch highlights England failing

Vithushan Ehantharajah at the MCG
England have been steadfast in their approach to the start of ODI innings but they were given another lesson in the value of power at the top of the order by Aaron Finch
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"Bring in Tymal Mills!" they cried, when Mitchell Johnson and his slingy left arm rained down with great vengeance - because, quite clearly, the best way to combat a bowler is by picking an inexperienced one who shares the same action. "We need our own Boof!" claimed others - months after the same people mocked the promotion of Darren Lehmann, a man of the people, beers and smokes, at the expense of Micky Arthur.

Quicker than you could say "whitewash", Australia were the example to strive towards to be a better you; England were the dodgy friend your mum, in hindsight, never liked the look of.

Cricket is a sucker for self-reflection but its real strength is this mock Stockholm Syndrome - the tendency to admire your captors that every side, not just England, have suffered from during their darkest hours.

On this occasion, as the MCG swayed, by its own heady standards, with "just" 38,066 fans - most dressed in other people's clothes - it was hard not to revel in a smiting by Aaron Finch, whose hundred guided Australia to a comfortable victory. The old grumbles about the pace of England's own top order were quickly unpacked.

"That's how Australia went about it," offered Alastair Cook afterwards, suggesting that England themselves dealt in top-order hundreds, at their very best. But Finch's 121 couldn't have been more un-English had it belched in your face and offered no apology.

Cook denied the need for extra brawn at the top of the innings but you would be hard pressed to find any England fans who watched their team limp to 2 for 28 in their first 10 overs - compared to Australia's 64 without loss - that didn't yearn for similar force from a man in red rather than retro green and yellow.

Truth be told, England have their own svelte Finch-a-like in Alex Hales - the No. 1-ranked Twenty20 batsman in the world (Finch is ninth) - who is currently on these shores biding his time with the Adelaide Strikers in the Big Bash League before the international Twenty20s begin.

Since the new ODI regulations came into effect in late 2012, England have only managed to break the 50 barrier four times from 16 in which they have been allowed the full first 10 Powerplay overs. Only once, in Southampton last June, have they passed 60, their hand forced by a monstrous New Zealand total of 359. Even then, it wasn't enough.

Here, England's lower-middle order of Ravi Bopara, Ben Stokes and Jos Buttler (with the additional help of Tim Bresnan) was charged with reaching par rather than taking them out of sight. Were it not for Gary Ballance's 79 and Eoin Morgan's much-needed impetus when he came in at 3 for 62, this game could have been over before the seagulls arrived to make the MCG theirs for the night.

Australia didn't happen upon batsmen like Finch. Take a cursory look around the BBL and you will find a plethora of heavy-hitters who, to steal a line from Dirk Nannes, have "a bit of a waist, thanks to a steady diet of 'cans' and 'darts' with their mates".

For a while, that's all Finch was - your mate at the pub that could hit a big ball. There was little doubt he could do the business in the small confines of the shortest format, but Australia's reluctance to chance him in the 50-over game was noteworthy.

It was the 2012-13 Ryobi Cup that won them around, as Finch notched two centuries and 504 runs across seven matches. Two years after his international T20 debut, he had his ODI one. But poor returns against Sri Lanka and West Indies cast an uneasy slant on 12 months since, which featured an astonishing 156 off 63 balls in T20 against England and a stat-buffing one-day 148 against Scotland.

He has fought off other candidates to open, such as Shaun Marsh and Phillip Hughes, who enjoyed a more fruitful 2013 in ODI cricket but didn't make Australia's squad for this series. And Finch paid out tonight.

At first he swung freely, enjoying three lots of good fortune, the most harrowing of which came when he just managed to pierce the hands of Ballance, positioned at mid-off, when he tried to force Chris Jordan over the top. On 8 at the time, he ran the bonus two runs and took the break between overs to collect himself. Another reprieve of sorts occurred two overs later when he edged through the second-slip region that had only just been vacated.

From then on, he was seemingly happy to concede that this slow pitch wasn't designed for his game. Twos were taken with ease, as boundary fielders were teased with drop-and-runs into the leg side. Once Australia were ahead of the rate, Finch helped maintain an appropriate, steady pace until he was eventually dismissed. By then, it was all over.

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • on January 14, 2014, 5:50 GMT

    Its was sheer agony watching England in the just completed Ashes series. It seems that Root and Cook are determined to give the English fans more misery in the ODIs

  • trigga315 on January 14, 2014, 1:03 GMT

    @200ondebut There is a serious problem with the English selectors for this current tour and they have been proven incapable on many occasions. Yes in most cases they will know better than the public but if you take a close look at some of their decisions whilst taking into account how they were used and the outcome. The thing is they don't have to defend their choices for instance. 1. Picking multiple tall fast bowlers such as Finn, Tremelett (1 match) and Rankin who were clearly out of form and refusing to play them. 2. Persisting with Root and Cook despite how bad they perform. Root averages 7.8 in his last 5 ODI's. That is less than what Doherty and Mckay's career averages. 3. Picking Trott when he clearly wasn't up to coming 4. Not resting players enough over the last 18 months. Some of which look exhausted. 5. Picking a player who basically can't bat or field (Panesar) and only bowling him for 16.5 overs for the match of which 5-6 were once the match was ove

  • on January 14, 2014, 0:51 GMT

    No team with Bopara in it has the slightest chance of winning - why the hell does he get so many chances?

  • PeerieTrow on January 13, 2014, 22:41 GMT

    Apologies CodandChips, a failed attempt at levity. No criticism was intended. I've watched Vince grow into a full sized bat over the years and have anticipated him being harvested for the greater good of English cricket for some time.

  • Kelum_w on January 13, 2014, 22:13 GMT

    England administrators need to take a good hard look at their coaching structure, Flower maybe their most successful coach they've had but they are slowly turning in to what Pink Floyd so eloquently put in "Another brick in the wall". Back in the 1930's (courtesy of the Bodyline TV series) they laughed at Don Bradman saying his unorthodox style will never be successful, guess what, the Don remains the pinnacle of batting standard. They seems to be hell bent against flamboyant flair when it comes to cricket, it is evident in their batting, bowling and even their fielding. Chris Jordan looked all the bit like the 70/80's tall WI fast bowlers, even had an raw action similar to Marshal. Apart from that everyone looked too manufactured, too black and white. You can't sustain 4 players like Cook, Bell, Root & Balance in the top in ODIs When Eng won the 10/11 Ashes in Aus they said Flower had African Flair with White Man sense. Seems to me that African flair has gone out of the window.

  • wellrounded87 on January 13, 2014, 20:45 GMT

    I know Cook is the captain but if I were an English selector i'd be dropping him (making Bell captain) and Root for Carberry and Hales/Wright. You need someone who come out and blast a quickfire 40-50 runs at the beginning to set up your innings. Adam Gilchrist was the perfect example of this and Finch/Warner do a similar job not nearly as good. Hales is a player who can win a game by himself, right now England don't have anyone like that. Australia have 4 in Finch Watson Warner and Bailey. The best England have is Bell who is a solid performer but not really a match winner. KP used to do it, Hales Carberry and Wright can do it yet none of them are in the team.

  • CodandChips on January 13, 2014, 19:33 GMT

    @Mycro3A not sure what you are trying to say. At face value, I'm not sure how you could ask this or possibly expect me to answer- how could I know if we've met eachother?

    If it is a criticism of my selection of Briggs and Vince, let me explain myself. Briggs has sturggled in T20Is but bowled nicely in his only ODI, and since he is here would be worth a go- he can hardly do worse than Tredwell at home vs Australia. On Vince, he can bat through and bat positively, and has had some success in all forms, which suggests he might be worth a punt in such a series like the West Indies, especially when it is probably the least important thing coming up in the next few months (no disrespect to West Indies).

  • GrindAR on January 13, 2014, 19:07 GMT

    why do eng drop (Finch & Co) so many times? Like 1 down Finch, 2 down Finch and 3 down Finch.... So they had 4 Finches to contain... Look like they really have no intention of playing cricket... Just cancell this tour and go home and sleep enough to really think with foot on ground. Anyways we are seeing worst than 90's eng. IPL have more Aussies than Eng. So IPL created better test appetite players than not.

  • ENGLANDEXPECTS on January 13, 2014, 18:50 GMT

    Lets be honest here, and it pains me to say this. One team is playing exciting, attacking, positive cricket. The other is getting more negative game by game. Australia's batting in all formats is full of exciting attacking batsmen scoring at nearly 3.5 runs per over in the tests. No occupy the crease here, attack from the first ball, get on top of the opposition. Most of the time in the tests England struggled to reach 2 an over. There bowling is full of menace, bowling to take wickets not just save runs. Its time for a drastic change in England's attitude. We are playing ODIs as they were played in the seventies. 250 is a good score for us, every one else wants 300 minimum. To have any chance in next world cup team should be Bell, Hales, Wright, Pieterson, Morgan, Bopara, Buttler,

  • PeerieTrow on January 13, 2014, 18:46 GMT

    Hmm..... Have I seen you at The Rose Bowl CodandChips? No, I meant Rose Bowl.

  • on January 14, 2014, 5:50 GMT

    Its was sheer agony watching England in the just completed Ashes series. It seems that Root and Cook are determined to give the English fans more misery in the ODIs

  • trigga315 on January 14, 2014, 1:03 GMT

    @200ondebut There is a serious problem with the English selectors for this current tour and they have been proven incapable on many occasions. Yes in most cases they will know better than the public but if you take a close look at some of their decisions whilst taking into account how they were used and the outcome. The thing is they don't have to defend their choices for instance. 1. Picking multiple tall fast bowlers such as Finn, Tremelett (1 match) and Rankin who were clearly out of form and refusing to play them. 2. Persisting with Root and Cook despite how bad they perform. Root averages 7.8 in his last 5 ODI's. That is less than what Doherty and Mckay's career averages. 3. Picking Trott when he clearly wasn't up to coming 4. Not resting players enough over the last 18 months. Some of which look exhausted. 5. Picking a player who basically can't bat or field (Panesar) and only bowling him for 16.5 overs for the match of which 5-6 were once the match was ove

  • on January 14, 2014, 0:51 GMT

    No team with Bopara in it has the slightest chance of winning - why the hell does he get so many chances?

  • PeerieTrow on January 13, 2014, 22:41 GMT

    Apologies CodandChips, a failed attempt at levity. No criticism was intended. I've watched Vince grow into a full sized bat over the years and have anticipated him being harvested for the greater good of English cricket for some time.

  • Kelum_w on January 13, 2014, 22:13 GMT

    England administrators need to take a good hard look at their coaching structure, Flower maybe their most successful coach they've had but they are slowly turning in to what Pink Floyd so eloquently put in "Another brick in the wall". Back in the 1930's (courtesy of the Bodyline TV series) they laughed at Don Bradman saying his unorthodox style will never be successful, guess what, the Don remains the pinnacle of batting standard. They seems to be hell bent against flamboyant flair when it comes to cricket, it is evident in their batting, bowling and even their fielding. Chris Jordan looked all the bit like the 70/80's tall WI fast bowlers, even had an raw action similar to Marshal. Apart from that everyone looked too manufactured, too black and white. You can't sustain 4 players like Cook, Bell, Root & Balance in the top in ODIs When Eng won the 10/11 Ashes in Aus they said Flower had African Flair with White Man sense. Seems to me that African flair has gone out of the window.

  • wellrounded87 on January 13, 2014, 20:45 GMT

    I know Cook is the captain but if I were an English selector i'd be dropping him (making Bell captain) and Root for Carberry and Hales/Wright. You need someone who come out and blast a quickfire 40-50 runs at the beginning to set up your innings. Adam Gilchrist was the perfect example of this and Finch/Warner do a similar job not nearly as good. Hales is a player who can win a game by himself, right now England don't have anyone like that. Australia have 4 in Finch Watson Warner and Bailey. The best England have is Bell who is a solid performer but not really a match winner. KP used to do it, Hales Carberry and Wright can do it yet none of them are in the team.

  • CodandChips on January 13, 2014, 19:33 GMT

    @Mycro3A not sure what you are trying to say. At face value, I'm not sure how you could ask this or possibly expect me to answer- how could I know if we've met eachother?

    If it is a criticism of my selection of Briggs and Vince, let me explain myself. Briggs has sturggled in T20Is but bowled nicely in his only ODI, and since he is here would be worth a go- he can hardly do worse than Tredwell at home vs Australia. On Vince, he can bat through and bat positively, and has had some success in all forms, which suggests he might be worth a punt in such a series like the West Indies, especially when it is probably the least important thing coming up in the next few months (no disrespect to West Indies).

  • GrindAR on January 13, 2014, 19:07 GMT

    why do eng drop (Finch & Co) so many times? Like 1 down Finch, 2 down Finch and 3 down Finch.... So they had 4 Finches to contain... Look like they really have no intention of playing cricket... Just cancell this tour and go home and sleep enough to really think with foot on ground. Anyways we are seeing worst than 90's eng. IPL have more Aussies than Eng. So IPL created better test appetite players than not.

  • ENGLANDEXPECTS on January 13, 2014, 18:50 GMT

    Lets be honest here, and it pains me to say this. One team is playing exciting, attacking, positive cricket. The other is getting more negative game by game. Australia's batting in all formats is full of exciting attacking batsmen scoring at nearly 3.5 runs per over in the tests. No occupy the crease here, attack from the first ball, get on top of the opposition. Most of the time in the tests England struggled to reach 2 an over. There bowling is full of menace, bowling to take wickets not just save runs. Its time for a drastic change in England's attitude. We are playing ODIs as they were played in the seventies. 250 is a good score for us, every one else wants 300 minimum. To have any chance in next world cup team should be Bell, Hales, Wright, Pieterson, Morgan, Bopara, Buttler,

  • PeerieTrow on January 13, 2014, 18:46 GMT

    Hmm..... Have I seen you at The Rose Bowl CodandChips? No, I meant Rose Bowl.

  • Englishmanabroad on January 13, 2014, 17:35 GMT

    Being here on the East Coast of USA, I stayed up to watch all of the English innings, but I had to go to bed at ~2:30, and so I missed the Australian innings. The English total of 278 seemed "respectable", but most likely a loser, and so I was not surprised to see that they lost. Having said that, when I read the report, it seemed to me that it would have been more truthful to say that Australia were quite "lucky to win". Reading the litany of missed chances, questionable decisions, etc, such as Finch dropped on eight, it makes me wonder. Consider Joe Root. I read all of the posts below about how he should have walked etc, but I don't see why especially if he was convinced that he made contact (snicko seemed to indicate that there was contact before reaching the pad) Again, having said that I must add, How much longer must we watch Cook giving up his wicket in the same way. Its like watching replays every match. Time for a change in captaincy??

  • CodandChips on January 13, 2014, 17:32 GMT

    Same old absurd formula of getting the top order to bat painfully slowly for as long as possible, putting all the pressure on our finishers and then hoping a four man attack can defend it. This may have sort of worked in CT13 but only because Broad, Anderson and Swann/Tredwell bowled well, and Trott and Bopara batted well.

    Short term solution open with Carberry and hope he repeats Hampshire performances. For tour of West Indies, perhaps have James Taylor at 3 and James Vince opening.

    For next match though 1.Cook/Bell 2.Carberry 3.Ballance 4.Morgan 5.Bopara 6.Stokes 7.Buttler 8.Woakes 9.Jordan 10.Finn 11.Briggs

  • JG2704 on January 13, 2014, 16:40 GMT

    @landl47 on (January 13, 2014, 14:27 GMT) And as I responded yesterday - out of our experienced players it was only Morgan who performed. Our best performers were Ballance,Buttler and Jordan. If our players are overscheduled then what's the point of playing depleted versions of Bell,Cook and Root? We'll only find out if others can make the grade if we try them out - no?

    Also how many big scores do you reckon our senior batsmen would make if they were constantly batting between 6 and 8?

  • JG2704 on January 13, 2014, 16:34 GMT

    @Cpt.Meanster - It's a 2 way street. IPL has probably improved certain players but which overseas players would be significantly poorer (cricketwise) without IPL? Mitch had a decent IPL and has rediscovered his mojo in tests but by all accounts his shorter format form was never an issue. Narine is probably a player IPL has helped develop but pretty much all the players the IPL franchises go for are either established (therefore showing their quality leading to IPL interest) or those in the twilight of their careers. Of the few England players IPL franchises have picked I cant think of one who has not represented his country several times. I think IPL may go for Hales or Buttler (maybe Lumb and Wright) but these players have been performing on the English domestic scene for some time now

  • xtrafalgarx on January 13, 2014, 16:31 GMT

    @Landl47: That's too far away. By then, Even Root will be nigh on 30. You can't always be trying to look far ahead. If you build for the future, you will only ever win in the future. Get the best players in now, not youngsters who are struggling to find their feet. Their time will come when they are good enough.

  • PeerieTrow on January 13, 2014, 15:09 GMT

    The voice of reason, landl47. Good call.

  • landl47 on January 13, 2014, 14:27 GMT

    As I wrote in reviewing the match, this is a young, inexperienced England side playing a much more experienced and older squad. Aus had 6 players over 30 (it will be 7 when MJ comes back) and only one under 25. England had only one player over 30 (Bell) and 5 under 25.

    It's no good pushing players in just because they lash at the ball. They have to be able to score big runs on a reasonably consistent basis. England has some very good young players in the squad now and there are more waiting in the wings. I'm not sure they'll be ready for 2015, but that's the luck of the draw. By 2019 I expect England to be a very strong side in all formats.

  • Dashgar on January 13, 2014, 14:17 GMT

    Well if England want some impetus at the top of their order they should look no further than Luke Wright who is currently dominating the BBL as an opener for the stars. He can also bowl a bit and fields well. Hard to see why he isn't given another shot. Root isn't a one day player. He can do a job vs weak sides but Australia have more than got his measure.

  • 2.14istherunrate on January 13, 2014, 13:43 GMT

    It's a good article with a great first half. It's true I am suddenly seeing Australia is the only way-Stockholm syndrome. But it's hardly surprising given the second innings' batting assaults launched by Warner.Then one looks at England-bogged down again as cook and Root slow it all down. Yesterday really Bell was okay,It's just that Cook and Root were not. Root's idea of international cricket is to do nothing for an hour and then get out, wasting a review if possible. Contrast to a very exciting middle order from Morgan down. We have the players in these games but need a kick start. I would try Finn for the hapless Rankin, and give Root compassionate leave for a few months. He is done, make no mistake.He's young and has a whole career ahead. Why kill him off now? Rankin, I feel, just is not there or even -a bouts.Cp Jordan-with the right fields could be good. The spinners don't interest me. Rather play Monty,thanks.He can bowl sometimes.

  • 200ondebut on January 13, 2014, 13:37 GMT

    Hey - it wasn't that long ago that England were the No 1 ranked ODI side. Yes, it surprised me as even a fan I didnt feel they were dynamic enough.

    The point is, as others have made, we all love to act like national selectors and pride ourselves on being able to pick a much more exotic side than anyone else. However, this is not a PS3 game - it is real life.

    There is no use being 126 for 6 after 15 overs - that is not the way to play this game. Two new balls and a reduced number of outfielders outside of powerplays points towards retaining wickets. As we see in all T20 comps - scoring at 10 an over is possible with wickets in hand (although you dont want top be basing your chasing strategy on this high a rate).

    Lets see how things pan out. If Eng had taken their chances and had a touch more luck who knows what the Aussie score would have been.

  • PeerieTrow on January 13, 2014, 13:22 GMT

    Somebody, somewhere in one of these threads suggested that those contributing could choose a better team than the England selectors. I have seen no evidence of that to date. Surely if there's one thing worse than one failing set of players, it's reverting to another set that has failed equally badly in the past.

  • ThinkingCricket on January 13, 2014, 13:22 GMT

    This piece tells the absolute truth. The English have a terrible mindset which is why they aren't going to win any limited overs competitions any time soon. The teams with the most positive intent at the moment are Australia, Bangladesh (Yes! Bangladesh! Though their lack of quality undermines it a bit) and India, when it comes to limited overs these teams have a huge edge over the other countries where to different degrees they have rigid, negative mindsets and they systematically coach the flair out of their most talented players.

    The one good thing about the new rules are they will soon enough force teams to confront the inadequacies in their strategies which are being woefully exposed by aggressive teams who are showing just how dangerous batsmen can be when they aren't told to "play according to situation".

  • JG2704 on January 13, 2014, 13:10 GMT

    I wonder if someone like Ian Harvey has any coaching qualifications? He was at the heart of Gloucs glory days in shorter formats and himself excelled with both bat and ball. I've always been impressed with him as a pundit so I wonder if he could do a job. I really dont like the way Eng go about their OD game. They rely on so many things going right for them. A few of us said as much a year or so ago when we were getting results 270 a few years ago would have been a very defendable taget but the game's moved on and we dont have the bowlers we had a few years ago to defend such a total. Or maybe someone who has been part of the IPL.

    I really dont see any way forward with the set up as it is.

  • on January 13, 2014, 13:02 GMT

    @Jerryraj: Don't get me wrong, I love Pete Trego as much as anyone, but I cannot imagine him getting called up ever. I'm not really sure he is good enough in either discipline but god damn he would be so much better to watch than Cook/Bell/Root etc.

  • JG2704 on January 13, 2014, 13:02 GMT

    @ xtrafalgarx on (January 13, 2014, 9:52 GMT) Does it look that much better? Broad has been inconsistent in shorter fmts in the last year or so and KP isn't the threat he was several years ago and Jimmy probably wont be around too much longer

    @Chris Retter on (January 13, 2014, 10:16 GMT) Hales would need to play like Hales does and not alter his game too much to fit in with the gameplan. We saw what happened when Carberry played ODIs and my fear is that Hales,Wright and co will do similar

  • JG2704 on January 13, 2014, 13:01 GMT

    As I've said before it's as much about the ingrained/rigid approach to the game as anything else.I can almost picture a robot in the pavillion saying in a dalek voice "Too early for Buttler" if anyone gets out before the 40th over. What a wasteIMO Ballance should have gone harder earlier too and if that wasn't to be the case then those around him should have come in and swung the bat a bit more.24 off the latter 5 PP overs is awful. The pedestrian starts don't help anyone. I'm all for having an accumulator as well as a power hitter at the top of the order but not 3. For me there should always be one power hitter (realistically capable of regularly going at a SR of 100+) in the 1st 10 overs. I know people say about Bell can be a positive player (and indeed he looks great when he is) but more often than not he is not. For me you could have a top 6 of Hales,Lumb,KP,Morgan,Wright and Buttler and I reckon our management would coach the positive intent out of them

  • on January 13, 2014, 13:00 GMT

    An interesting (and highly telling) stat from yesterday's game: England scored exactly 100 runs in boundaries (19 x 4, 4 x 6). Australia in boundaries, scored....102 (24 x 4, 1 x 6). It is not so much the boundary hitting as the picking up of ones and twos where Australia proved far more adept than England, although the impetus that Aus got in their opening ten overs (7 x 4, 1 x 6) was psychologically crucial, especially compared to the 2 x 4 England managed in 10 powerplay overs. Hales and Lumb, or Carberry and Vince, or any combination of these players...anyone but Cook, Bell, Root at the top please!

  • py0alb on January 13, 2014, 11:44 GMT

    The sensible thing to do would have sent every single member of the Test squad home on compassionate leave.

  • on January 13, 2014, 11:43 GMT

    Why not have Luke Wright and Hales in the team. And taking catches always helps. If England had held catches in the Ashes could have made a big difference.

  • RyanHarrisGreatCricketer on January 13, 2014, 11:01 GMT

    This is the best XI for England:

    Bell, KP, Stokes, Samit Patel, Morgan, Bopara, Buttler, Broad, Bresnan, Jordan and Borthwick OR Dernbach

  • on January 13, 2014, 10:54 GMT

    @Jerryraj, you're classing Root as an all rounder? I'm not sure his batting's good enough for that classification.

  • PFEL on January 13, 2014, 10:41 GMT

    @ Cpt. Meanster, re IPL, I think you have that backwards. The best players are the ones playing in the IPL, because they are the best players and the IPL wants the best players. They aren't the best players because they have played in the IPL and the IPL makes them the best players.

  • storm81 on January 13, 2014, 10:22 GMT

    Hales, KP (c), Bell, Morgan, Bopara, Buttler, Stokes, Broad, Jordan/Mills, Briggs, Anderson. That should be England's XI heading into the WC, will it happen? Of course not.

  • on January 13, 2014, 10:16 GMT

    Once you add Hales, Peterson, Broad and Anderson then England have the players who could win the WC. But not with current Leadership and Management. some of the Ashes players and the captain look mentally defeated after the Ashes debacle.....

  • xtrafalgarx on January 13, 2014, 9:52 GMT

    Lets not forget however that if you put Pietersen, Broad and Anderson back into this team, it begins to look A LOT better. With a good spinner they good give the WC a good shake, so it's not all doom and gloom for the poms. We need to keep playing better and better.

  • xtrafalgarx on January 13, 2014, 9:45 GMT

    The IPL does help some of our boys to get used to Indian conditions and also get used to high level T20 cricket.

  • Jerryraj on January 13, 2014, 8:54 GMT

    if England need a win, team shold be as below Cook,Bell, KP, Trego , Baristow,Wright,Root, Stokes, Broad, Anderson, Jordan. All rounders- Wright, Root,Stokes, Broad,Trego Spinners- Root, KP

  • PrasPunter on January 13, 2014, 7:31 GMT

    @electric_loco_WAP4 , absolutely - test cricket is the real one - even lesser teams can win the odd WC but being the best test-playing nation for a long time matters the most. IPL is a haven for sloggers and has-beens.

  • electric_loco_WAP4 on January 13, 2014, 7:05 GMT

    Yet another IPL is around corner. And all those who failed in int. cricket playing for their country will shine in IPL.Thing is it has grown so big and hot magnet of players all over the only priority is IPL not int. cricket esp. the 'real' cricket-test.

  • PrasPunter on January 13, 2014, 6:49 GMT

    @Cpt. Meanster, Aus is a strong cricket-playing nation with the best success rates over several years and our fortunes are not going to be dictated by a plain-silly slogfest that arrived only 5 years ago.

    Funny to see how people always try to related the success of others to something or other from india.

  • Cpt.Meanster on January 13, 2014, 6:05 GMT

    @PrasPunter: Of course the nation of Australia doesn't benefit from the IPL. The IPL isn't a body of the UN. It's your players that benefit from the IPL, however you look at it. The IPL will be just fine without your players. If it ain't Aussie players, it will be someone else. Cool down.

  • Cpt.Meanster on January 13, 2014, 5:52 GMT

    @PrasPunter: I don't like sliced bread. Is that still what you Aussies have everyday for breakfast ? I am Canadian btw and we prefer our bagels to sliced bread thank you. If you thought my comment was a satire, it's not. The IPL has certainly improved the strike rates of some top players world wide and T20 cricket has also given a new impetus to test cricket. You cannot cover your eyes any longer and complain it's dark.

  • PrasPunter on January 13, 2014, 5:46 GMT

    @Cpt.Meanster, Aus won 4 WCs including 3 in a row before the next big thing since sliced bread called the IPL ever came into the fore. Its not that Aus benefits out of the IPL - infact it is the other way around. Enough blowing the IPL trumphet.

  • PrasPunter on January 13, 2014, 5:32 GMT

    yes , the IPL is the one-stop solution for all of the World's problems. It is the next big thing since sliced bread. Let's stop what-ever we do and follow the IPL, to enlighten our lives. The game moves forward only because of the IPL. People learn to hold bats and balls only after the advent of the IPL - right @Capt. Meanster ?

  • Cpt.Meanster on January 13, 2014, 5:17 GMT

    England's ignorance of the IPL has once again exposed their ODI team. Look at Australia, SA, NZ and even WI; most of their players play in the 2 month long T20 league and their players have gotten that much better in the limited overs formats. Aaron Finch has featured in the IPL in multiple seasons and look at how he's batting. Mitchell Johnson's form can be attributed to the IPL stint with Mumbai Indians where he took on the batsmen head on. Shane Watson, George Bailey, James Faulkner all play in the IPL and do well for their teams. Ironically, the ONLY English player to have featured in the IPL regularly is Eoin Morgan and he scored FLUENTLY and played fearless cricket. What does that tell ? The reality is England cannot afford to ignore the IPL any longer. Their ODI and T20 teams look ordinary with old school methods. They won't win much games unless their players play in the IPL. I hope the ECB sheds its iron curtain and does something for the good of English cricket.

  • on January 13, 2014, 2:51 GMT

    I am sri lankan but england fan still england selectors doing same mistak should change batting order and why they not giving the chance to alex halex and luke write they are hard hitting batsman cook should play one down responsible place and stive finn still out give him a chance.

  • on January 13, 2014, 2:41 GMT

    still england in same track. why they not change there batting order they have big hitters like luke write a

  • foozball on January 13, 2014, 1:56 GMT

    Joe Root should go home, I think. He's not going to learn anything [more] on this tour, is having a horrendous time, and there are other options available... pretty much choose anyone who hasn't been dominated over the tour to date. A strike rate of 13 or thereabouts for a #4 is astonishing, even for England.

    Have the 3 lions on his chest ever looked so embarrassed, out of place?

  • neil99 on January 13, 2014, 1:14 GMT

    Over the past 18 months or so we've witnessed a run of terrible results with scores way below par for the modern ODI game. Including SA in 2012, England has won 2, drawn 1 and lost 4 series.

    It's the same old. A steady decline at the top produces what can only be described as shambolic scoring rates - usually less than 4 per over. When those top order batsmen invariably fail to score big, the pedestrian scoring leaves the middle and lower middle order too much to do - they often can't strike with freedom and get out cheaply, or just manage to scramble a total on the low side of reasonable. This seems to be the case whether England bats first or chases down.

    So what's the answer from the England set-up? It's continue as normal, head down. Just like the test side, England's brand of cricket needs immediate overhaul. Yet again England with one dimensional captain Cook at the helm show they are incapable of "Plan B".

  • electric_loco_WAP4 on January 13, 2014, 1:05 GMT

    Rather say Eng are being overpowered senseless by an understrength Aus-virtually a B team-showing gulf betw. 2 sides. Another series w/w-add to a long list-by the far superior Aussies looms.

  • ShutTheGate on January 12, 2014, 23:03 GMT

    After watching this game it seems that England's tactics and methods for a ODI are old school. I think they will need to adapt to a bigger hitting style influenced by T20 in order to remain competitive.

    300 used to be the score that was considered likely to be unbeatable. That score is now 350, so 270 is only defendable if wickets are being taken on a regular basis. The bowlers and the field placements weren't attacking enough. Boyd Rankin seemed to be totally unthreatening last night, Jordan unlucky IMO.

  • on January 12, 2014, 22:52 GMT

    Re balajik2505 - you are entitled to your opinion, but the facts show that Pakistan were the best team as they won the final and player of the match was akram. Pakistan won by 22 runs and made the total with 6 out, england were all out. I'm Aussie, and both sides got to the finals and we didn't, so you are entitled to say that England trumped Australia in that series, although from what I can see our two teams never met because of the luck of the draw. But no point harking back 20 years. Your side has done better much more recently, and will improve again.

  • on January 12, 2014, 22:51 GMT

    England went into this game with a thin bowling line up. One that didn't carry much wicket taking punch. That in mind it was important they made the most of their batting innings. Having their grafters waste so many deliveries early was always going to put them behind the 8-ball. If England continue to score 270 type scores I think Australia will chase them down with ease. There is a lot of power and talent in that batting line up.

  • pat_one_back on January 12, 2014, 22:03 GMT

    If this is the batting line up Eng are sticking with then this may be their best score for the series sadly, this was the C-grade attack with neither MJ or Patto with a new ball. Root at 3 is just laughable, he's lost form & confidence but that aside he shows nothing you'd look for in an ODI top 3, he or Cook can open with Bell as 'the stayer' but no middle order could sustain the pressure of both of them soaking up overs seeing off the new balls as opposed to seeing a hard ball to the fence ala Warner & Finch. Bell showed he has the strokes to bat up, someone help him please, we have 4 days of international cricket days left and I'd like to at least see some mildly competitive cricket played.

  • on January 12, 2014, 20:38 GMT

    We have a lot of left-arm seamers in the county game who all look decent in domestic limited overs cricket. We're crying out for variety in the bowling as much as the batting. The one major tournament we've one - the T20 in Windies - we had Sidebottom and Yardy. The IPL's most difficult to hit bowlers seem to be left-arm seamers bowling wide and full of off stump. England seem to try to do everything their own way and ignore the way the best teams go about it. I'm beginning to think we are as arrogant as some people claim we are.

  • elsmallo on January 12, 2014, 19:28 GMT

    It's dangerous to try to out-Australia Australia, but England could (touring squad restrictions aside) try opening with Lumb and Hales, a la 20/20. In their current condition, Cook and Bell are unlikely to strike fear into any hearts (although Bell was decent) and Root even less. The middle order from Ballance to Buttler looks good. I'd try Hales, Lumb, Bopara, Bell as the top four. Cook needs to find some form, and some new ideas. Everything is going wrong for him at the moment and it's catching on in the camp - get him away from the new players before the contagion spreads. Stokes already looks beat down; Jordan was clearly exasperated at every near miss that came off his bowling. I can't believe I'm saying it, but Bell would be a better captain now than Cook.

  • xtrafalgarx on January 12, 2014, 16:04 GMT

    These days, for teams like India, Australia, SA, 320 is probably a par score. I remember i used to quite like this English method of using 3 test players at the top to build a platform then used the last 10 for the big hitters. It worked for them when they made it to no.1 as well, but that was with Swann, Anderson and Broad the peak of their powers, that isn't the case now. You need to be able to put big runs on the board, and you need batsmen who can hit the ball in the air in the top 3 and have 1 or 2 accumulators in the middle order.

    Warner is now becoming more measured in his approach, so he could improve but he has a bad record in ODI's. Finch, I used to think was too gung ho for ODI's but he is maturing nicely. However the best types of players at the top of the order are the stroke makers who are powerful enough to clear the ropes. Guys like Virat Kohli and Rohit Sharma, but if Finch and Warner can get it right, we should give the worldcup a real good shake.

  • Brett_in_China on January 12, 2014, 15:53 GMT

    England appear to be accepting that they will place their cricketing future in the hands of one man - Andy Flower. Very strange. Sole power to choose? Why would any nation agree to have everything down to one man? That is one of the most bizarre (or bizzare, or any other form of spelling, I can't quite remember) things I have heard in 50 years of following cricket. Surely England can do better than that. Are you so bereft of ideas in management?

  • balajik2505 on January 12, 2014, 15:04 GMT

    Despite the 5-0 shellacking, England can still pick up the pieces and rebuild a good Test side, but I don't see much of a future for them in the limited overs games. Shame really, considering that in the 1992 World Cups England was the best team. It's a different matter that Pakistan won the match that mattered. The game has changed, but England somehow seems to do everything wrong in the limited overs format. Their total today was pretty much par for England, but wasn't going to make Australia sweat. Most international teams today will easily handle a chase of 270, even in pitches which have something for the bowlers.

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  • balajik2505 on January 12, 2014, 15:04 GMT

    Despite the 5-0 shellacking, England can still pick up the pieces and rebuild a good Test side, but I don't see much of a future for them in the limited overs games. Shame really, considering that in the 1992 World Cups England was the best team. It's a different matter that Pakistan won the match that mattered. The game has changed, but England somehow seems to do everything wrong in the limited overs format. Their total today was pretty much par for England, but wasn't going to make Australia sweat. Most international teams today will easily handle a chase of 270, even in pitches which have something for the bowlers.

  • Brett_in_China on January 12, 2014, 15:53 GMT

    England appear to be accepting that they will place their cricketing future in the hands of one man - Andy Flower. Very strange. Sole power to choose? Why would any nation agree to have everything down to one man? That is one of the most bizarre (or bizzare, or any other form of spelling, I can't quite remember) things I have heard in 50 years of following cricket. Surely England can do better than that. Are you so bereft of ideas in management?

  • xtrafalgarx on January 12, 2014, 16:04 GMT

    These days, for teams like India, Australia, SA, 320 is probably a par score. I remember i used to quite like this English method of using 3 test players at the top to build a platform then used the last 10 for the big hitters. It worked for them when they made it to no.1 as well, but that was with Swann, Anderson and Broad the peak of their powers, that isn't the case now. You need to be able to put big runs on the board, and you need batsmen who can hit the ball in the air in the top 3 and have 1 or 2 accumulators in the middle order.

    Warner is now becoming more measured in his approach, so he could improve but he has a bad record in ODI's. Finch, I used to think was too gung ho for ODI's but he is maturing nicely. However the best types of players at the top of the order are the stroke makers who are powerful enough to clear the ropes. Guys like Virat Kohli and Rohit Sharma, but if Finch and Warner can get it right, we should give the worldcup a real good shake.

  • elsmallo on January 12, 2014, 19:28 GMT

    It's dangerous to try to out-Australia Australia, but England could (touring squad restrictions aside) try opening with Lumb and Hales, a la 20/20. In their current condition, Cook and Bell are unlikely to strike fear into any hearts (although Bell was decent) and Root even less. The middle order from Ballance to Buttler looks good. I'd try Hales, Lumb, Bopara, Bell as the top four. Cook needs to find some form, and some new ideas. Everything is going wrong for him at the moment and it's catching on in the camp - get him away from the new players before the contagion spreads. Stokes already looks beat down; Jordan was clearly exasperated at every near miss that came off his bowling. I can't believe I'm saying it, but Bell would be a better captain now than Cook.

  • on January 12, 2014, 20:38 GMT

    We have a lot of left-arm seamers in the county game who all look decent in domestic limited overs cricket. We're crying out for variety in the bowling as much as the batting. The one major tournament we've one - the T20 in Windies - we had Sidebottom and Yardy. The IPL's most difficult to hit bowlers seem to be left-arm seamers bowling wide and full of off stump. England seem to try to do everything their own way and ignore the way the best teams go about it. I'm beginning to think we are as arrogant as some people claim we are.

  • pat_one_back on January 12, 2014, 22:03 GMT

    If this is the batting line up Eng are sticking with then this may be their best score for the series sadly, this was the C-grade attack with neither MJ or Patto with a new ball. Root at 3 is just laughable, he's lost form & confidence but that aside he shows nothing you'd look for in an ODI top 3, he or Cook can open with Bell as 'the stayer' but no middle order could sustain the pressure of both of them soaking up overs seeing off the new balls as opposed to seeing a hard ball to the fence ala Warner & Finch. Bell showed he has the strokes to bat up, someone help him please, we have 4 days of international cricket days left and I'd like to at least see some mildly competitive cricket played.

  • on January 12, 2014, 22:51 GMT

    England went into this game with a thin bowling line up. One that didn't carry much wicket taking punch. That in mind it was important they made the most of their batting innings. Having their grafters waste so many deliveries early was always going to put them behind the 8-ball. If England continue to score 270 type scores I think Australia will chase them down with ease. There is a lot of power and talent in that batting line up.

  • on January 12, 2014, 22:52 GMT

    Re balajik2505 - you are entitled to your opinion, but the facts show that Pakistan were the best team as they won the final and player of the match was akram. Pakistan won by 22 runs and made the total with 6 out, england were all out. I'm Aussie, and both sides got to the finals and we didn't, so you are entitled to say that England trumped Australia in that series, although from what I can see our two teams never met because of the luck of the draw. But no point harking back 20 years. Your side has done better much more recently, and will improve again.

  • ShutTheGate on January 12, 2014, 23:03 GMT

    After watching this game it seems that England's tactics and methods for a ODI are old school. I think they will need to adapt to a bigger hitting style influenced by T20 in order to remain competitive.

    300 used to be the score that was considered likely to be unbeatable. That score is now 350, so 270 is only defendable if wickets are being taken on a regular basis. The bowlers and the field placements weren't attacking enough. Boyd Rankin seemed to be totally unthreatening last night, Jordan unlucky IMO.

  • electric_loco_WAP4 on January 13, 2014, 1:05 GMT

    Rather say Eng are being overpowered senseless by an understrength Aus-virtually a B team-showing gulf betw. 2 sides. Another series w/w-add to a long list-by the far superior Aussies looms.