The Investec Ashes 2013 July 23, 2013

Tearful Pattinson falls victim to batting failures

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Not only has Australia's dreadful batting cost the team a 2-0 deficit after as many Investec Ashes Tests, it has now claimed a human casualty in the form of the young fast bowler James Pattinson. Fighting back tears the morning after he was diagnosed with a back stress fracture that has ended his tour, Pattinson admitted that a lack of rest between bowling innings at Lord's had contributed to his injury.

It had been thought that the older and injury-prone Ryan Harris would be most susceptible to physical breakdown after little more than three hours separated England's first and second innings at Lord's, but it was Pattinson who suffered most. He felt stiffness on the second day and grew increasingly worried as it worsened across the match. His dismissal by Graeme Swann on the fourth evening after an innings of admirably stubborn refusal to yield will be Pattinson's last memory of the series.

"When you go out doing what you do it's hard on the body and in an ideal world you'd like a bit more rest than that. It's far from ideal," Pattinson said. "You go out there and put your body on the line and you're playing for your country ... once I get a bit more mature, I've said it a thousand times before, but I'm still hoping one day my body is going to mature and I'll be able to do that back-up not just for two Tests but five.

"It could have been worse, but it's pretty shattering something you've worked so hard for is taken away. It's a hard road ... it's not as bad as what it was before in the past when I've had six to twelve months out of the game, which is pretty hard and a few lonely days in the MCG gym getting back towards playing. So I'll go through that again but I'm in a positive frame of mind that one day it'll get better and hopefully it does, so fingers crossed."

In the conversations Pattinson had on Monday night after learning of the extent of his ailment, the name of England's spearhead James Anderson was raised as a source of hope. Having endured his own nightmarish run of injuries as a younger man, Anderson has matured into a bowler as durable as he is skilful, illustrated by his ability to bowl a 13-over spell to help England to victory in Nottingham before backing up at Lord's.

"That has been thrown up overnight, in conversations about Jimmy Anderson, whose career started with a lot of injuries," Pattinson said. "There are a dozen other bowlers in the same position. You live in hope that one day it will go away. I am only 23. I am pretty happy with what I have achieved in the game so far but I would like to have fewer setbacks. I am a pretty strong person and I think I can bounce back strong and come back bigger better and stronger than I did last time."

As for his own approach to bowling, which so far has erred on the side of full throttle just about every ball of his life, Pattinson said as he matured he would learn how better to move up and down through the gears, much as Anderson and Dale Steyn have done.

"In games you can sum up when it is swinging. It is not in my personal makeup to go out and not give 100 percent. I like bowling fast," Pattinson said. "Dale Steyn sometimes bowls within himself and picks the right time to go hard. I am not at that stage yet. I have to go 100 percent to make sure I am in the team and performing for my country. When I get older there will be times I can do that.

"At training I go pretty hard too. I can look at that. Personally, the only way is to give everything you got. I am very proud of representing Australia and it is something I love doing. It is disappointing to work your arse off and have it taken away."

Daniel Brettig is an assistant editor at ESPNcricinfo. He tweets here

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • funkybluesman on July 24, 2013, 3:29 GMT

    I think that measures CA put in to supposedly protect young fast bowlers are actually part of the problem. Younger bowlers have serious limits on the number of overs in a spell and a day, and so they just don't build up the body strength from consistent bowling, then they come to first class and test cricket and start bowling a lot more overs over back to back days and their bodies can't handle it.

    I reckon they need to do more bowling through their teenage years, not less, in order to get their bodies strong. Pat Cummins made his test debut at 18, there are still restrictions on spell lengths and overs in a day for him when playing at lower levels, but then he comes to 1st class and test cricket and is bowling 50-60 overs in a match, which is so much more than he's ever done before, and his body breaks down.

    Need more bowling, consistently, from a young age.

  • ravi_hari on July 23, 2013, 12:27 GMT

    It is a combination of things that affected Pattinson. The foremost is his own physical makeup. I think the much praised Aussie physical training of its players looks flawed. Pattinson had many injury problems in his short career. It is no surprise that he broke down again. I think he is over stressing his body by going for pace. Everyone cannot be Brett Lee. Excepting Lee all those who tried to penetrate through pace have fallen to injuries. Shoab Akhtar, Shane Bond are best examples. Pattinson's physique and his action contribute to his injuries. The work load is acceptable in today's competitive world. Bowling 25 to 30 overs in an innings is a must for strike bowlers when the opposition bats for over 100 overs. Added to this if the conditions are hot and the wickets are flat the stress increases. I dont think Pattinson should blame the batsmen for his injury. However, I think it has come as a blessing in disguise for the Aussies. Trying Bird or bring back Starc will be easier.

  • Cricket_theBestGame on July 26, 2013, 6:38 GMT

    the bowlers of 80s and earlier, used to get their strength from surprise surpsie from bowling hours on in the nets. there was no fancy gyms or anything like that. the body got used to bowling long spells. not saying it should be done without any gym work, but it seems these days players are more interested in looking pretty by hitting the gym too much

  • Chris_P on July 26, 2013, 3:49 GMT

    2MikeGattings. I agree you are way too hard on on Hughes. being the youngest batsmen to have scored a century in each innings, & against Steyn & Co on a quick pitch would suggest he has more than a little talent. Having seen him play for the first 5 years or so of his first class career for NSW I can assure you, he lacks nothing with any of his shots playing all types of bowling with almost ridiculous ease with a somewhat alternate technique. At some point, some batting "coach" decided he looked ungainly & worked on improving his "technique". The result was the befuddled guy in 2009, he batted nothing like he had been doing & he is slowly, albeit very slowly, returning to the process that vaulted him to the national side. Matthew Hayden, fti, after 10 tests had one century & averaged 26 & he didn't do too bad in his overall career I would suggest. The problem he has is that he in a side that is struggling with the bat while he is on a learning curve.

  • on July 26, 2013, 2:47 GMT

    Bird Harris Siddle Starc quicks and Lyons for spin,don't need another batsmen because the tail score the bulk of the runs. Maybe its a challenge for the batters to score runs knowing we have 5 bowlers. Agar had a great start and one to look out for, but his left armers just didn't deliver on a spin friendly wicket. Bird is a must for the Aussie team, Tall right are fast med with good accuracy, bit like a Glenn McGrath.

  • H_Z_O on July 25, 2013, 18:01 GMT

    @2MikeGattings lots of players from England or Australia struggle against spinners when they make the jump up to international cricket. He's hardly alone in that.

    As for the other specialist openers, Rogers is a 35 year old with an excellent record at First Class level, but who has looked average, at best, so far in his Test career. I think he just looks better because of the shambles that is the rest of the top order.

    Cowan looked solid and disciplined until this tour, and then he looked anything but up at Trent Bridge. That's why even his staunchest supporters felt he needed to be dropped for Lord's. He needs to remember what kind of batsman he is, and stick to being that. But even then, I'm not sure he'll ever be a match-winner.

    Between them David Warner and Phil Hughes have 83 Test innings. Watson has 79. In those 79 he has 2 hundreds. They have 6.

    The question isn't why the Australian selectors favour Hughes, but why they never seem to question Shane Watson's place.

  • 2MikeGattings on July 25, 2013, 12:19 GMT

    @HZO No question Hughes has talent but he has been repeatedly found out at the top level. When he came on the scene got a deluge of 1st class runs but test batsmen have to adapt their game and he has been easy to limit. I'm sure he would prefer going in at the top of the order because his technique against spin looks inadequate. If that is a requirement then he shouldn't get picked: there are already 2 specialist openers in the side.

  • H_Z_O on July 25, 2013, 9:29 GMT

    @2MikeGattings have to disagree with you about Hughes. I think he's a talent, but needs to play like he did up at Trent Bridge. In all the excitement over Agar's near century, people overlooked the guy quietly making his way to 81 at the other end.

    This obsession over Hughes' technique is funny. Here's a few other lefties with far from textbook technique: Chanderpaul, Katich and Graeme Smith.

    After 26 Tests Michael Clarke had 1501 runs at 42.88 with 4 hundreds, batting at 5 and 6 for most of that time below Langer, Hayden, Ponting, Martyn, Katich, Hussey and Lehmann himself. After 26 Tests Ricky Ponting had 1525 runs at 39.10, with 3 hundreds, all scored at 6 below Mark Taylor and both Waugh brothers.

    After 26 Tests Hughes has 1535 runs at 32.65, with 3 hundreds, all scored opening the batting, all scored away from home (two in South Africa, one in Sri Lanka). The boy can bat. If anything, the selectors have mishandled him, dropping him, moving him around the order constantly.

  • on July 25, 2013, 8:13 GMT

    Call in Dennis Lillee he had a major back problem(it was back then) an he came back a much better bowler,just to give advice to ALL fast men how to be more effective with fast bowling.

  • 2MikeGattings on July 25, 2013, 5:45 GMT

    @HZO I agree about KP, the noises were that he would probably be passed fit, although whether he can summon the motivation to put together a score in what is almost a dead rubber is highly questionable.

    I really don't get why Hughes is so highly favoured by the Aussie selectors. I reckon if he gets any kind of score at Sussex they will keep him in the side and drop the perennial fall guy Khawaja for Warner. Smith will be retained, on a bunsen at OT he is likely to play Swann as well as anyone in the side and his random tweakers will offer a contrast to Lyons steady offbreaks.

  • funkybluesman on July 24, 2013, 3:29 GMT

    I think that measures CA put in to supposedly protect young fast bowlers are actually part of the problem. Younger bowlers have serious limits on the number of overs in a spell and a day, and so they just don't build up the body strength from consistent bowling, then they come to first class and test cricket and start bowling a lot more overs over back to back days and their bodies can't handle it.

    I reckon they need to do more bowling through their teenage years, not less, in order to get their bodies strong. Pat Cummins made his test debut at 18, there are still restrictions on spell lengths and overs in a day for him when playing at lower levels, but then he comes to 1st class and test cricket and is bowling 50-60 overs in a match, which is so much more than he's ever done before, and his body breaks down.

    Need more bowling, consistently, from a young age.

  • ravi_hari on July 23, 2013, 12:27 GMT

    It is a combination of things that affected Pattinson. The foremost is his own physical makeup. I think the much praised Aussie physical training of its players looks flawed. Pattinson had many injury problems in his short career. It is no surprise that he broke down again. I think he is over stressing his body by going for pace. Everyone cannot be Brett Lee. Excepting Lee all those who tried to penetrate through pace have fallen to injuries. Shoab Akhtar, Shane Bond are best examples. Pattinson's physique and his action contribute to his injuries. The work load is acceptable in today's competitive world. Bowling 25 to 30 overs in an innings is a must for strike bowlers when the opposition bats for over 100 overs. Added to this if the conditions are hot and the wickets are flat the stress increases. I dont think Pattinson should blame the batsmen for his injury. However, I think it has come as a blessing in disguise for the Aussies. Trying Bird or bring back Starc will be easier.

  • Cricket_theBestGame on July 26, 2013, 6:38 GMT

    the bowlers of 80s and earlier, used to get their strength from surprise surpsie from bowling hours on in the nets. there was no fancy gyms or anything like that. the body got used to bowling long spells. not saying it should be done without any gym work, but it seems these days players are more interested in looking pretty by hitting the gym too much

  • Chris_P on July 26, 2013, 3:49 GMT

    2MikeGattings. I agree you are way too hard on on Hughes. being the youngest batsmen to have scored a century in each innings, & against Steyn & Co on a quick pitch would suggest he has more than a little talent. Having seen him play for the first 5 years or so of his first class career for NSW I can assure you, he lacks nothing with any of his shots playing all types of bowling with almost ridiculous ease with a somewhat alternate technique. At some point, some batting "coach" decided he looked ungainly & worked on improving his "technique". The result was the befuddled guy in 2009, he batted nothing like he had been doing & he is slowly, albeit very slowly, returning to the process that vaulted him to the national side. Matthew Hayden, fti, after 10 tests had one century & averaged 26 & he didn't do too bad in his overall career I would suggest. The problem he has is that he in a side that is struggling with the bat while he is on a learning curve.

  • on July 26, 2013, 2:47 GMT

    Bird Harris Siddle Starc quicks and Lyons for spin,don't need another batsmen because the tail score the bulk of the runs. Maybe its a challenge for the batters to score runs knowing we have 5 bowlers. Agar had a great start and one to look out for, but his left armers just didn't deliver on a spin friendly wicket. Bird is a must for the Aussie team, Tall right are fast med with good accuracy, bit like a Glenn McGrath.

  • H_Z_O on July 25, 2013, 18:01 GMT

    @2MikeGattings lots of players from England or Australia struggle against spinners when they make the jump up to international cricket. He's hardly alone in that.

    As for the other specialist openers, Rogers is a 35 year old with an excellent record at First Class level, but who has looked average, at best, so far in his Test career. I think he just looks better because of the shambles that is the rest of the top order.

    Cowan looked solid and disciplined until this tour, and then he looked anything but up at Trent Bridge. That's why even his staunchest supporters felt he needed to be dropped for Lord's. He needs to remember what kind of batsman he is, and stick to being that. But even then, I'm not sure he'll ever be a match-winner.

    Between them David Warner and Phil Hughes have 83 Test innings. Watson has 79. In those 79 he has 2 hundreds. They have 6.

    The question isn't why the Australian selectors favour Hughes, but why they never seem to question Shane Watson's place.

  • 2MikeGattings on July 25, 2013, 12:19 GMT

    @HZO No question Hughes has talent but he has been repeatedly found out at the top level. When he came on the scene got a deluge of 1st class runs but test batsmen have to adapt their game and he has been easy to limit. I'm sure he would prefer going in at the top of the order because his technique against spin looks inadequate. If that is a requirement then he shouldn't get picked: there are already 2 specialist openers in the side.

  • H_Z_O on July 25, 2013, 9:29 GMT

    @2MikeGattings have to disagree with you about Hughes. I think he's a talent, but needs to play like he did up at Trent Bridge. In all the excitement over Agar's near century, people overlooked the guy quietly making his way to 81 at the other end.

    This obsession over Hughes' technique is funny. Here's a few other lefties with far from textbook technique: Chanderpaul, Katich and Graeme Smith.

    After 26 Tests Michael Clarke had 1501 runs at 42.88 with 4 hundreds, batting at 5 and 6 for most of that time below Langer, Hayden, Ponting, Martyn, Katich, Hussey and Lehmann himself. After 26 Tests Ricky Ponting had 1525 runs at 39.10, with 3 hundreds, all scored at 6 below Mark Taylor and both Waugh brothers.

    After 26 Tests Hughes has 1535 runs at 32.65, with 3 hundreds, all scored opening the batting, all scored away from home (two in South Africa, one in Sri Lanka). The boy can bat. If anything, the selectors have mishandled him, dropping him, moving him around the order constantly.

  • on July 25, 2013, 8:13 GMT

    Call in Dennis Lillee he had a major back problem(it was back then) an he came back a much better bowler,just to give advice to ALL fast men how to be more effective with fast bowling.

  • 2MikeGattings on July 25, 2013, 5:45 GMT

    @HZO I agree about KP, the noises were that he would probably be passed fit, although whether he can summon the motivation to put together a score in what is almost a dead rubber is highly questionable.

    I really don't get why Hughes is so highly favoured by the Aussie selectors. I reckon if he gets any kind of score at Sussex they will keep him in the side and drop the perennial fall guy Khawaja for Warner. Smith will be retained, on a bunsen at OT he is likely to play Swann as well as anyone in the side and his random tweakers will offer a contrast to Lyons steady offbreaks.

  • on July 25, 2013, 4:29 GMT

    Instead of Changing the White Ball every 25 overs, change your fast bowlers. Bring a new set of fast bowlers in each innings for the Test matches. This is the only way to protect these new age Fast and brittle men.

  • HowdyRowdy on July 25, 2013, 0:55 GMT

    Rotten news Patto, but look forward to seeing you when you are fit and firing again.

    I reckon that Pattinson has the right combination of pace, movement and a fast bowler's mean streak to succeed long term in Test cricket.

    Patto can take inspiration from Peter Siddle's journey to becoming a front line Test quick. Those who are interested can check out Sid's bio on Cricinfo - he had to overcome a potentially soul destroying series of injuries: shoulder reconstruction, shoulder dislocation, stress fractures and foot problems.

    It's clear that utter resolve and commitment to do whatever work was needed, for as long as needed, was what got Siddle through all this, when lesser competitors would have given up.

    Personally I reckon that Patto has the same commitment and ultimately will come back as a top level Test quick.

  • Paul_Rampley on July 24, 2013, 19:57 GMT

    @Sunilbatra good points champ. For his replacement it will be a close call between Starc and Bird. Both are fantastic fast bowlers. For the batting my picks for the guys who will fire in the remaining tests are Clarke, Watson and Khawaja. I think the third test will be a much closer affair then people think.

  • Sunil_Batra on July 24, 2013, 19:39 GMT

    @EdwardsAnderson well said mate, Pattinson is a future star for us and he will fight his way back in. Rogers, Watson and Khawaja are my picks as batsman who will come through for us, Khawaja looked fantastic for his 50 in tough conditions and will hopefully convert which he has publicly stated as well. Watch out for Lyon as well, i am sure he will get picked in Manchester

  • sharidas on July 24, 2013, 18:20 GMT

    There is no better sight than a fast bowler tearing in to terrorize batsmen and any young fast bowler wants to give it 100%. That is where the problem is. They should always keep energy in reserve and bowl at their maximum only in bursts. If a bowler feels that he cannot go any faster,is not the best thought. Glenn Mcgrath always looked relaxed. I bet he never expended all his energy in every ball that he bowled. It is about time common sense and good bowling coaches took over.

  • screamingeagle on July 24, 2013, 17:23 GMT

    Nowadays I feel bad for aussies. Never thought I would say that...

  • Mitty2 on July 24, 2013, 14:09 GMT

    @RU4REALNICK, most definitely Smith. His batting in India on those pitches against some pressurized and quality spin (people take away from how well Ashwin and Jadeja actually bowled in that series - albeit helped by pitches that were, to be kind, disgraceful to test cricket) was brilliant and defied everyone - especially me, and of course, the rest of the batsmen (including Clarke) who failed. His temperament, technique and mental strength has improved phenomenally, he has just got some very good balls from Swann this series. Also, bird has had two A tours to England and a test tour match, his record is much better in Aus, he's not exactly horses for courses (although the last tour was hampered by injury and the first he struggled with the conditions); he's just better than Starc.

    @millhouse, Maddison is a slogger, Doolan is a journeyman with temperament but not enough talent. Hughes is far better than both. His struggles are predominant mental - he will come good with persistance.

  • R_U_4_REAL_NICK on July 24, 2013, 12:41 GMT

    @Mitty2: how about Steven Smith? Yeah or nay? Khawaja yeah for me - I think he should be persisted with throughout entire series to see what he's made of; Hughes is a nay for me - does not look test standard at all, and (like Warner) one or two random big scores to keep the average grossly inflated is not my cup of tea. Very surprised Bird wasn't a shoe-in from the very beginning of the series; firm believer in 'horses for courses' and Bird (and Clint McKay's) style of bowling is perfect for U.K. test cricket.

    PLEASE Aus. - don't choose Cummins! I hate to see players stretchered off the pitch after 4 overs, no matter what team they play for. 5 days (potentially) is a long, hard time...

  • Edwards_Anderson on July 24, 2013, 12:15 GMT

    Pattinson is a future test star, he will come back strong, he will fire for us in the home ashes series. As his replacement either Starc or Bird are good options, i am leaning towards giving big bird a go. And our batsman will stand up in Manchester, i think Khawaja will continue his good form from Lords and expect a big one from either Watson or Rogers as well.

  • on July 24, 2013, 11:46 GMT

    You are dead right Cameron. Hughes has failed at international level over 30 times in his 49 innings. How many more chances does he get? None is the answer. Voges has to replace Hughes and Khawaja has the talent, the technique and the consistency to be our No 3 for the next ten years. Keep him there so he does not have to worry about a failure here and there. Finally get rid of Clarke as captain - a great batsman but a hopeless leader of men.

  • Jaffa79 on July 24, 2013, 11:45 GMT

    @ Mitty2, I don't get the Hughes love. He is clearly not 'immensely talented' but incredibly average. His technique is so flawed it is not even funny! Sure he can swish the ball through the offside when set (or not, as seen in his first innings Lords dismissal) but he is poor against the short stuff, poor against the ball coming back into him, very poor against spinners and seems to lack in temperament and shot selection. I have never seen Doolan or Maddinson but surely they or anyone is better than Hughes. All of the Aussie tail have more assured techniques than Hughes. I'd love him to stay in the team by the way!

  • BrianCharlesVivek on July 24, 2013, 11:39 GMT

    What a talent he is and its very unfortunate that he has to leave. The problem is caused mainly due to his bowling action. If we observe closely, he effortlessly generates 140+, which should either strain his shoulder, ankle or back...SOme one should work on his action, so that he can play longer. Cummins also might suffer the same fate, he bends his back way too much. See Shaun Tait, Simon jones whose actions put tremendous strain on their back..

  • Blakey on July 24, 2013, 11:11 GMT

    Maybe he should sue the batsmen for incompetence. Good to see Warner has scored a few runs against SA. It would have been good to see Doolan make a hundred as well.

  • handyandy on July 24, 2013, 10:56 GMT

    I am wondering if he will be fit for the Australian season.

  • Mitty2 on July 24, 2013, 10:37 GMT

    @villageblacksmith, what are you doing here? Is this the first time you've commented since before both Bell's beautiful innings where you continually denigrated him and hilariously suggested to have the three of Compton, Root and Bairstow in the same team rather than one of the most technically affluent (let alone experienced) batsmen in world cricket???

    @Cameron, we can't lose Hughes, as he and Khawaja are the only young talents that are right now ready to play test cricket (as sad as it is). Hughes is immensely talented, and was almost certain to get a century in the first innings of the first test until Agar got out (Hughes didm;t even give one chance away). Even if it takes the rest of the series, he and Khawaja have to be certain selections... We need continuity and we need to look to the uninspiring future. But yes, Bird has to play. For about a million more reasons than just the typical 'is suited to English conditions'

  • H_Z_O on July 24, 2013, 10:24 GMT

    @2MikeGattings yeah, but he'd probably also tell us Sachin's no substitute for KP ;).

    I agree, of course Taylor's no KP. But we've hardly seen the best of KP in this series and I don't think it's the body blow that an injury to, say, Michael Clarke, would be.

    That said, from everything I've heard, it sounds like a lot of the "worry" over him is overblown media frenzy and that the prognosis is, he'll probably be fit. They'll take Taylor to Old Trafford, probably, just in case, but I'd be very surprised if KP misses the match. England will likely risk it, try and seal the series 3-0 and then if needed he can rest out the remaining two Tests to make sure he's fit to tour.

  • mcheckley on July 24, 2013, 9:36 GMT

    Imagine bowling fast, in heat, through a long innings. You're totally worn out. Eventually the innings ends. You drag yourself out of sweat-soaked clothes and into the shower, then you pretty well fall asleep in the dressing room. But in less than a couple of hours someone is shaking your shoulder - "get some pads on, mate, we're pretty well all out!". Stiff and sore you dig your batting stuff out of the bottom of your bag, and drag yourself to the middle. Aching, you struggle to remember what your coach told you at school. Do the basics. Watch the ball - get into line. If in doubt, play forward .. etc etc. It's not your job, but you're a professional cricketer and refuse to give up. By sheer determination you grind out 20 or 30 runs but eventually, you are inevitably undone and the innings ends. And now comes the worst bit - totally fried, physically and mentally, YOU'RE EXPECTED TO OPEN THE BOWLING AGAIN !!! Australia's batting frailty will inevitably result in injured fast bowlers .

  • on July 24, 2013, 7:52 GMT

    Bird has to be a walk up start for the next test. His style of bowling would suit English conditions.

  • on July 24, 2013, 7:49 GMT

    You know the 5 of the 7 batsman in the Australian squad for the ashes are all openers so how can this be a fully functional batting line up ? Watson and Hughes have to go. Hughes' technique is still not good enough for international level- The side should be Cowan Rogers Kawaja Clarke Bailey Smith Haddin Agar Siddle Harris and Bird. At least with Bailey in the side you would have another natural middle order batsman in the side. The likes of Doolan, Voges and Forrest must be considered as they are all natural middle order batsmen. I just don't understand why anyone can say they can have a great batting lineup with so many openers in the side. Mind you, not a lot of batsmen are really putting their hand up for consideration at first class level.

  • Ankitsuperking on July 24, 2013, 7:48 GMT

    I think it's time to get back Johnson back in the team......He has been in good firm in IPL and last few outings.... He is good with bat as well and experience will also be handy.......

  • OnlyTestsMatter on July 24, 2013, 7:42 GMT

    Dear Poms and Ozzies. Do remember that all sport is cyclical. Sometimes you're on top, sometimes you're at the bottom. If you're very lucky, for a brief period of time, you'll have a dream team. It is never you're god-given right to be number 1. Ever. Love, The rest of the world.

  • SherjilIslam on July 24, 2013, 7:39 GMT

    Yes definitely, Australia lost a Batsman.

  • on July 24, 2013, 5:57 GMT

    Australia lost a batsman :)

  • VillageBlacksmith on July 24, 2013, 5:49 GMT

    after all the pre-series puff about him from aussie and their press, (aussies on here suggested aussie team have the top 5 bowlers in the world) patto has significantly underdelivered, like he did last year in Eng when he didn't even take a wkt! so excuse a lot of us for smirking at his vengeance spiel, it sounded like it was coming from a playground... and now, 2 matches in he has to take his toys and go home... just like last year... they will certainly miss his batting but hardly his ton-up bowling..

  • on July 24, 2013, 5:39 GMT

    Reading loads of rubbish here, First Australia has great fast bowler coming thru the ranks, problem is previous coaching mentor to these bowlers has been lll advised and thus, all these break downs of players, Second, how fast was Holding Ambros ? Not that fast really, every one likes to debate who was fastest, who cares, results matter and in that Aktar and Lee 2 modern Fast bowlers dont have exellent averages, were McGrath bowled at 134kph has Superiour figures, Just as Holding and Ambros are Medium fast bowlers, see Height line and length is what is important , something all young bowlers need to learn, use a upright delivery method, this way you can bowl fuller, batsman drives at the ball but there is more bounce, result look at the records for wickets taken caught behind, Ambros and McGrath are masters of this. Glen once said he could bowl at 150kph but didnt need to as his style allowed for more bounce and this was more important.

  • tony122 on July 24, 2013, 4:51 GMT

    Australian fans often gloat about quality of their young pace bowlers. And justifiably so- Pattinson,Bird,Cummins,Starc,Hazelwood erc. But a crucial point in a modern Test team you only play 3 fast bolwers. So having 6-7 very good bowlers is poor compared to 3 outstanding bowlers like SA has. Also you are not going to win many Test matches with just pace bowlers- you need spinners and a good allrounder. Also I do not see any young fast bowler in Australia who is destined to be great or is a tearaway. Pattinson looks outstanding but I feel he is less than great and his speed is less than express fast even at a young age. I am not sure about Cummins- let us wait and see but I am told he is a little slower than Pattisnson- but may get more bounce than him. So Cummins look the best bet. But overall Australia seems to have a lot of good bowlers coming through but little variety and no (Cummins??) genuine confirmed great.

  • tony122 on July 24, 2013, 4:43 GMT

    @subbass- You really think Holding and Thommo somehow used to bowl faster than current crop of bowlers? Highly unrealistic given the fact almost in all sports speed has increased. You know when you zip around at 80 miles in a good hihway it does not feel so fast. But 50 miles on a city road can seem fast. Same way player's reaction and past memory is no guide to compare speed across generations. Also guys like Thommo would have been slaughtered in modern day. Dennis Lillee was a great bowler and would still be. But remember he was fast Medium. He may have started as a genuine quick but lots of modern bowlers start that way too. Also he was not that tall for a fast bowler. Holding- I think may be as good as any fast bowler in history. But overall I believe fast bowlers have kept on improving decade on decade.

  • AidanFX on July 24, 2013, 4:18 GMT

    His stats may have looked unimpressive last match - but big loss for Australia. Wish the knockers would leave him alone. most balls he bowls is with an upright seem. He has a great action. is a great find for Australia. Pity we don't have batsman of the same caliber to look forward to.

  • JustIPL on July 24, 2013, 3:35 GMT

    @ravi hari Featured Comment: Please also include Ishant, Umesh, Varun and Munaf to the list of bowlers who broke down wishing to become Lee or Holding or Mcgrath.

  • pulkit10 on July 24, 2013, 3:26 GMT

    Can't be a single factor for such a critical injury. I'm sure he'll bounce back but he'll have to monitor his body very well and see what how it responds to the various stresses.

    Of course, bringing down the pace is a solution but Pattinson must decide what he really wants from his bowling - does he want to hold down one end and aim for discipline/accuracy? or does he want to be that strike bowler with great pace? If he tries out too many things at once, he'll have trouble. Steyn performs both roles (recently, it has been the latter) but Steyn also trains in a way that he doesn't injure himself. You'll have to get the basics right to become as good as Steyn at staying fit (seriously, this is the first time he is actually properly injured and he has been bowling for the past 5-6 years).

    Tough road ahead for Pattinson and wish him all the best!

  • on July 24, 2013, 3:08 GMT

    The grounds in England are not playable since there are full of dents in the pitch and ghat is the reason why even the mediocre so called spinners Root and Swann shine.The pitches are made to suit England and not internationally acceptable pitches

  • on July 24, 2013, 1:21 GMT

    Australia have some fantastic fast bowlers coming through like siddle, harris, pattinson, bird, sayers, cummins, starc, hazlewood, sandhu, Copeland, Faulkner. im also confident that we will have some batsmen pushing for selection in 5 months time. there will be plenty of first class cricket matches to be played before the start of next ashes series. Australia a tour of saf is starting later today. alex doolan, shaun marsh, nic maddinson, Jordan silk will be ready in 5 months time.

  • OneEyedAussie on July 24, 2013, 1:05 GMT

    The batsmen are 50 % of the story. Let's not forget that Pattinson, given his pace in the first innings at Lords, most likely carried a niggle into that match. Let's also not forget the simple dropped chance from Ian Bell and Siddle's front foot blunder. England should have been dismissed for much less than they were in both innings had Australia executed some fairly rudimentary cricketing skills.

  • AnoMaLy on July 24, 2013, 0:50 GMT

    Why do Aussies keep ignoring Mitchell Johnson is beyond me. Yes he can be expensive/wayward but he is a genuine wicket taker. You drop him for 2 years then pick him for 2 matches then drops him again. How do you expect the player to perform

  • MinusZero on July 23, 2013, 23:39 GMT

    Any new young quick should model themself on Glenn McGrath. He wasnt fast, only around mid 130s. Accuracy was his key, also bowling constantly outside off and letting the batsman get themselves out.

  • 2MikeGattings on July 23, 2013, 23:37 GMT

    @HZO Taylor is no substitute for KP, as KP would be the first to tell you.

  • 2MikeGattings on July 23, 2013, 23:36 GMT

    @NickSmith It depends if you consider Watson a 5th bowler or not. He is good enough, but only bowls 2 or 3 over spells.

  • 07sanjeewakaru on July 23, 2013, 23:31 GMT

    I saw Pattinson hit hard on his back and discomfort for a while when he tried to save 4 runs on the boundary in a T20 in Dubai last year.Commentators praised him for showing such a intent specially just after bowled an over.That's the difference from past and present.I heard Imran Khan said in his Cowdrey lecture fielding on the boundary by a fast bowler in those days limited to take an air bone.

  • Big_Maxy_Walker on July 23, 2013, 23:19 GMT

    cant blame the batsmen's failure on your inability to keep an accurate line and length and your pace up James. Lets face it, he was going to break down even if the batsmen were going well. Time for the selectors to pick Copeland or Bird.

  • on July 23, 2013, 22:55 GMT

    I cannot believe some posts have criticised Cook's decision to bat again as one reason for Pattinson's stress fracture. What a joke. He only bowled 40.1 overs in the match. Had England knocked up 600 in the first innings (which they well might once Cook, Trott and Pietersen start firing) he would have bowled a lot more without ANY break. The blame lies with the trainers, Cricket Australia, and quite possibly the player himself.

  • on July 23, 2013, 22:50 GMT

    I wish him a SPEEDY RECOVERY. But to be frankly speaking, this should be an end to his career. Aussies are slowly losing their pride / name / best batsmen / and now bowlers.

  • Alexk400 on July 23, 2013, 22:12 GMT

    He has bigger body ..more force on his body...he need to bowl his 70% and still fast. I think he do not know that happy medium. when team need wickets , he go all out and get hurt. He can do that now with his young body. I think he need to channel his energy and make him better swing bowler than fast bowler. Fast bowler job is tough. Swing bowler is best for him with his big tall frame.

  • on July 23, 2013, 21:54 GMT

    @cool sande. Yes this appears to be the trend even at club and state level in Aus - bowlers being over nurtured by sports scientists preaching the merits of limited spells in practice before games. If we look at the greats in the current and recent sides they are the guys who bowled lots of overs in practice and in games - steyn, mcgrath, anderson, b kumar. Less time in the gym and more on the field is how the greats have done it in the past... why not follow their lead. (Aus batsmen wud do well to follow this advice too).

  • Malx on July 23, 2013, 21:31 GMT

    God, CA is rubbish. What the hell do they do with their bowlers?? Cullins, now Pattinson . Let's get rid of ALL the coaches & just tell these players, go out & show us what you got !! Or, is that too simple ??

  • Beertjie on July 23, 2013, 21:23 GMT

    Not so, @YorkshirePudding on (July 23, 2013, 11:20 GMT). Bird had a similar diagnosis, as did Pattinson last season and both were playing within 3-4 months. It's an early stage issue so he'll play next Ashes for sure! @ReverseSweepIndia on (July 23, 2013), you forget Starc who'll cause enough problems if there were more runs to play with! Patto won't be missed, and hopefully someone else will be called up. Sayers would be my pick, but if Harris doesn't break down at OT, Doolan would be a better pick for CLS and the Oval, assuming guys like Hughes and Watson continue to struggle. Given the reality check of Lords, the only thing I can look forward to is seeing an attack of Pattinson, Cummins, Starc (or Faulkner) and Bird playing together in Perth. I was going to write "demolish England" instead of "playing together" but I no longer have the temerity (sic!).

  • T-800 on July 23, 2013, 21:10 GMT

    I get the disturbing feeling that the future potential cricketing greats for Australia are out there playing World of Warcraft or Halo or something worse. As miserable as the present lot appear to be when it comes to the batting and spin departments, I don't see any rising stars on the horizon. When is the next Steve Waugh or Rick Ponting or Shane Warne going to emerge from the Aussie cricketing cupboard? Not any time soon.

  • on July 23, 2013, 21:07 GMT

    Do Australia need to reconsider their policy of only playing four bowlers? It makes sense if you have a Swann or a Warne, but if you don't then it puts what seems to be unacceptable strains on the quick's.

  • subbass on July 23, 2013, 20:38 GMT

    @ Ravi - Brett Lee arguably had the same problem, but he did maintain his pace better than the guys you mentioned, but wqhen did he call time on his Test career. ? He wasn't that old.There is though too much cricket for anyone to bowl quickly in the longer format for their whole careers. Truly fast bowlers these days would almost HAVE to play one game on one game off. So player rotation is the only way you can be a genuine FAST bowler and still be bowling fast in your late 20's/early 30's. Still, who knows maybe one day someone will come along who can bowl at 110 MPH at full throttle. So then they just ease off a bit and send it down at a mere 93-95 mph thus playing their whole careers as a genuine FAST bowler as really, 88mph is just fast medium when you think of the likes of Holding or Jeff Thomson. No speed guns back then, but they were reckoned to be around 100mph consistently.

  • on July 23, 2013, 20:36 GMT

    The fragility of the Australian bowlers isn't something new, but it is disappointing that a young player is continually breaking down. He is not alone, and it is not a surprise. It is this that makes the boasts about this bowling attack look a little bit inflated as the primary bowling attack is seldom playing 2-3 tests in a row, in fact some of the players don't manage this. I wish him all the best with his recovery! For Australia to be fully competitive they have to be up to the challenge of the test series physically, and that means dealing with whatever the games throw their way, including being in the field for the best part of 2-3 days in a row.

  • GermanPlayer on July 23, 2013, 20:24 GMT

    So it has come down to this! A bowler getting injured because he had just a 3 hour break between innings? Oh My God! How low has Australian cricket sunk!

  • H_Z_O on July 23, 2013, 19:51 GMT

    @Lyndon McPaul on (July 23, 2013, 12:16 GMT)

    Sorry mate, but from what we've been told Pietersen's injury is a minor strain and it shouldn't rule him out of the Test. And if it does, James Taylor's in excellent form.

    His record this season in Division One is comparable to Rogers, his overall record is very good and while he didn't do particularly brilliantly against South Africa, they're a better side than Australia (and England for that matter) so I'd expect him to do a lot better against your boys.

    Besides which, KP's hardly had a stellar series. If Bell was injured you might have a point ;).

  • on July 23, 2013, 19:48 GMT

    i think pattison is not to blame. He got minimum rest not only between innings but also within the innings, couo\ple by the fact that the spinner Aston agar has proven ineffective. The lack of spin alternative is what worrying australia the most along with the batting failure.

  • Stubbzie on July 23, 2013, 19:40 GMT

    So now their best batsman is out of the series too?? Oh dear... 5 - zip here we come.

    By the way - the global media have Australian batting all WRONG... They bat right down to number 11... but only start at number 9.

  • coldcoffee123 on July 23, 2013, 19:24 GMT

    Here is a typical T20 scorecard. Compare this to the typical Aussie Test scorecard over the last 3 years and you would know why the similarity. http://www.espncricinfo.com/county-cricket-2013/engine/current/match/593670.html

  • on July 23, 2013, 19:19 GMT

    There was a lot of talk about the most "ruthless" course to victory that England could take after racking up that big first innings lead. Michael Holding, for instance, thought that the most ruthless thing would have been to enforce the follow-on, and go for a crushing innings victory.

    But I believe that the truly ruthless option, probably ruthless beyond the limits of good sportsmanship, was to force the Australian bowlers to bowl again, to stress their bodies, to wear them out, and possibly induce a series ending injury.

    I'd be interested to see whether commentators and fans think that, assuming that Cook did indeed have this calculation in mind when he decided to bat again, this is an acceptable strategy, or if it is taking ruthlessness too far.

  • SirViv1973 on July 23, 2013, 19:10 GMT

    @Lyndon McPaul, Sounds like your dreaming, Aus best chance to win a test was Trent Bridge. Eng always start slowly & almost always improve as the series continues. As for KP he hasn't contributed much so far & if he isn't fit I doubt he will be as big a loss as most of us would have feared at the outset. However I think the noises coming from the Eng camp at the moment suggests he is more likely to play than not.

  • Kcila on July 23, 2013, 18:53 GMT

    There is clearly something very wrong with the Australian training programme or fitness regime or both. First Pat Cummings makes his debut v SAF at 18 takes a bucket load of wicket and is never heard of again due to stress fracture. Now Pattinson. This is ridiculous. Lilley, Tommo, Alderman, McGarth and Co must be embarrassed by this new Australian weakness of only being able to bowl a few overs before collapsing unfit.

  • T-800 on July 23, 2013, 18:37 GMT

    This is the WORST Australian batting side EVER in recent history. How did Australian cricket sink to this level? With the retirement of Aussie greats such as Hayden, Ponting, Gilchrist, McGrath and Warne, some dents would have been expected in the Aussie performance but this is abysmal. I'm and Indian here and even for me its sad to witness the famed Ashes rivalry end up a damp squib because on of the teams in this historical rivalry appears to have simply disintegrated. At this point I wouldn't be too shocked if this ends up in a 5-0 whitewash. Time for some radical surgery for Australian Cricket.

  • Cricfever_PM on July 23, 2013, 18:30 GMT

    Pattinson has to work his back injury else his career could be in trouble!! He is tale and has good line & length which will prove him as quality bowler for another 10 years!!! Bird is another good bowler who can fill pattinson in XI!!! The big worry is remains with Batting line of Ozz!!! They have to come back strong and win matches!!! You no need to win ashes but at least win one and draw one or two so that the serious will be not boring!!!! After this ashes serious Watson may not get into Ozz test XI if he don't performs!!!

  • cool_sande on July 23, 2013, 18:28 GMT

    The reality is that the bowlers are not bowling enough overs and long spells in the nets.These days bowlers are so concerned about their shape and workout in gym so much to build big frame of body.Since they dont bowl enough and long in the nets,and suddenly in a match situation where one have to bowl 25 to 30 overs a day,their body is unable to coup with the sudden rigor and they fall apart like nothing.

  • Aussasinator on July 23, 2013, 18:12 GMT

    This was expected. His track record is two Test longevity at a time. I am not surprised. Now got to see how Mitchell Starc will take it and for how long. This pace bowling factory of Ozland has got its training methods wrong. These kids get injured in no time and need guidance, not just being told to go bowl full pace all the time. I said this before about Pat Cummins and Pattinson himself - its all happening. Now I expect Watson to start whining and back away from bowling or get injured next Test. Harris is of course there for one more Test max.

  • strikeforce2003 on July 23, 2013, 18:11 GMT

    Goodbye ,we know its been tough on you, get fit sooner Pattison Be proud as you gave your best with bat & ball as a Gen. Patton It's now upto your platoon to pick up the baton churn runs on better inningsn& batting totals, than the earlier seen C-ration!

    In your farewell to this Ashes, do write a note to Clarke.. 'To ply at the crease, perform, as that's the best sounding bark'

    Send a note to your famed yet under performing Watson 'get steadier, build on an innings, just not for himself, though as australia's son'

    Pen a letter to all your other mates to shed war they lack Telling them, ' I did what I could more thane I had to, broke my back'

  • SirViv1973 on July 23, 2013, 18:04 GMT

    @Vikram Halikar, To call any match in an ashes series 'meaningless' clearly shows how little you understand about the rivalry between the 2 nations.

  • on July 23, 2013, 17:59 GMT

    As he is currently topping the Australian ashes batting averages can he not stay on tour as a specialist batsman and give the top 7 a little bit of back bone?

  • Amith_S on July 23, 2013, 17:51 GMT

    I feel sorry for Pattinson and hope he comes back strong. Mike Hussey was on the radio this morning making the point that the Sheffield Shield pitches have become too bowler friendly which means batsmen aren't playing Test style cricket and certainly find it hard to play long innings; seam bowlers look far better than they really are; and spin bowlers have fewer oppportunities as they are not needed. This needs to be fixed. We have good batting talents in Khawaja, Smith in the team and they need to be shown confidence which i think boof will, Khawaja's knock in the second innings shows that the talent is there, just needs confidence shown in them. As for Patto get Bird or Starc in.

  • on July 23, 2013, 17:24 GMT

    @gsingh7 saying that Pattinson is only good at home and poor abroad is very harsh at this stage of his career. He is only 23. He himself admits he needs to mature. If you judge him on that criteria you can just as well call every Indian bowler in recent history overrated, including Kumble.

    TBH I didn't like some of the things he said about taking revenge and everything before the series. But I still feel sorry for him. He has genuine passion. That is something we must recognize and value. And that is why bowlers like him are always one up on others such as Hilfenhaus.

  • on July 23, 2013, 17:12 GMT

    Good luck to Pattinson. He will probably come back fitter and stronger and terrorise us.certainly he can look to how Jimmy Anderson bounced back after injury.

  • Witty_Cricketer on July 23, 2013, 16:58 GMT

    Wish you good luck mate, I believe in you, go back, keep working hard, one day you will be the number one bowler, a bowler batsmen would like to avoid.

  • Rahulbose on July 23, 2013, 16:52 GMT

    Pattinson has had a few injury issues, maybe all that frustration coming out. For Aussies the tour just keeps getting worse.

  • on July 23, 2013, 16:44 GMT

    What Absolute rubbish. The so called 'lack of time between innings' had nothing to do with his problem. It comes from lack of match fitness. End of story. Players from years past bowled FAR more then any guys today do and they never had these constant issues. Australia's bowling is just as bad as its batting. Constantly they give up huge scores yet we keep hearing how good the bowling is. Rubbish. pattinson bowled disgracefully in the 2nd test. Club bowlers are more accurate.

  • gsingh7 on July 23, 2013, 16:11 GMT

    change of bowling action is in order . this might take little fizz out of him but no way he will survive in today's demanding tests with his back in such bad shape. he is overrated as well. in last 6 tests that aus lost he has been mediocre to say the least . i dont know why aus team hyped him to high heavens when he can only bowl in aus and is average outside.

  • on July 23, 2013, 16:00 GMT

    The English tactics of keeping Aussies as long as possible in the field so as to cause psychological and physical damage to the opposition team members, is although what every team tries to do is certainly what every team does whenever possible. However these tactics can damage the long term career of bowlers and every team will suffer at some time. This will envitabally drive promising players away from test cricket. Pattinson will and should carefully consider his own future. What is the point in wasting your talent in fruitless and meaningless matches when authorities can not think about how best to preserve the rare bowling prospects.

  • on July 23, 2013, 15:58 GMT

    It is a painful news for the Australians.Pattinson is a bright prospect for australia.I am pretty sure that he will become one of the best bolwers in another 3 or 4 years.But now as a team they have move on and am pretty sure that Siddle will surely make a difference in the upcoming tests ..especially with the way he bowled in the first 2 Tests

  • Nutcutlet on July 23, 2013, 15:56 GMT

    I'm genuinely sorry that James Pattinson, a promising & wholehearted bowling all-rounder, has had his first Ashes' series curtailed by an injury brought about by being over-bowled. His expression on being dismissed in the 2nd inns at Lord's said much about him. Although the match had been lost hours before, he had applied himself to some effect. Nonetheless, he hated - truly hated - the realisation that he was out. If only the real specialist batsmen had shown the same dedication to the cause! He has the makings of a fine Test cricketer & if there's any justice in this world, there will be occasions to come when he will show England & English fans what he can achieve. In the meantime, anyone who appreciates the character & cricketing skill of the man will wish him speedy & complete recovery. The Oz top order should take the Pattinson lesson to heart; his departure componds their inability to sell their wickets as dearly as he does.

  • Fluffykins on July 23, 2013, 15:23 GMT

    Well I have to say that I think if I am asked to sum up his tour I will say arrived with a big chip on his shoulder wittering on about revenge for this brother, then informed us Joe Root would be targeted, bowled a bit, batted a bit better and then broke down and went home.

    I wish him well and for this his sake, CA sake and for Ashes prestige sake.I hope when we visit their place his performance is a little more inspiring.

  • NaniIndCri on July 23, 2013, 14:50 GMT

    Fast bowlers should shed down weight to endure tests. Bulky pacers will always have this factor with them early in their career when their body is developing.

  • 214ty on July 23, 2013, 14:49 GMT

    I feel for the young man. But honestly he is better off where he is at right now if he wants to continue playing cricket, cause there will not be too much rest between inngs. I think CA is also very happy to regard this as a "preservation period" just to save a promising bowler.

  • Greatest_Game on July 23, 2013, 14:43 GMT

    Kallis, at 38, still bowls spells where he gets up into the 140s. Steyn, who can get up to 150, at times bowls spells of around 135. That seems incongrous. Simply put, both monitor their physical condition, keep within their physical limits, and rely on skill - swing, variation, accuracy - not pure pace. And, they bowl with strategy.

    It is hard to find more contrasting pace bowlers. Steyn is small, lithe, light & a phenomenal athlete with an efficient bowling action. Kallis is a bear in comparison, & to generate pace uses upper body strength off a shorter run up. But, neither hits the ground hard, & neither will push hard if they feel a niggle.

    All bowlers have injuries - strains, perhaps tears. Few have stress fractures. Those who do are bowling too hard, pushing themselves beyond their limits, and causing those injuries. If your body can't handle it, develop a different action, push less, or stop bowling. Pattinson is high on motivation, high on aggression, low on smarts.

  • landl47 on July 23, 2013, 14:43 GMT

    I was sorry to hear that Pattinson, who is a very good young bowler and shows every sign of being a good enough batsman to be classified as an all-rounder, had suffered this injury. Hopefully he'll be fit for the return series.

    Hpwever, let this be a lesson to all those who said England should have enforced the follow-on in the second test. Pattinson's problems were made worse because he had less than a day's rest between sessions in the field. The follow-on proponents would have given England's bowlers NO rest between sessions, and with a 4-man attack, that's crazy.

    There were lots of other reasons not to enforce the follow-on- not giving up the advantage of bowling 4th on a wearing pitch, putting the game out of the reach of the Australians, etc.- but add this to the list.

  • crick_admirer on July 23, 2013, 14:42 GMT

    I don't think his action is flawed and he does not appear to be going for too much pace like Akthar or Tait. He looks physically strong as well but core and back strength are a bit different from arm and shoulder strength. I hope he will come back with an even more bio-mechanically sound action (like that of Brett Lee) that will enable him to maintain his pace with the least impact on his body (especially lower back).

  • Chris_P on July 23, 2013, 14:12 GMT

    He'll be back & believe me, he will be back stronger. A good thing for him to recuperate now & wait for the Aussie summer. With any of Bird/Faulkner/Starc in the wings, replacing him will not cause a major worry. His batting though is seriously under-rated, from all reports he was a promising opening batsman up until he was about 16 or 17 until he concentrated on his bowling. You can't half tell.

  • Speng on July 23, 2013, 14:06 GMT

    @12thman, Energy drinks aren't what's causing injuries and guys from back in the day didn't have very long careers. Lillee and Ian Bishop had back injuries - in the case of Bishop it ruined his career, Courtney Walsh was plagued by shoulder injuries, Michael Holding only played 60 tests, Joel Garner 56, Andy Roberts 47, Thommo 51, Lillee 70. Fast bowling is hard on the body and always has been and the guys back in the day - who played less cricket - as you can see would've lasted 3 - 4 years playing 12-15 tests a year plus ODIs, T20i etc. It is an absolute credit to sports medicine/ science that fast bowlers today are regularly having 75 - 100 test careers. If we want bowlers to have longer careers national teams need to develop more depth and young bowlers have to be brought along a bit more gently.

  • knownothingaboutcricket on July 23, 2013, 14:04 GMT

    It pains to know that an athlete( in this case -a cricketer ) is pulled out of a competition, because of an unforeseen injury. One surely has to sympathise with James Pattinson.

    However, does his absence leave an impact for the Aussies? Many would disagree with me, if I said YES IT DOES...While I would agree with most that his absence would not make any difference-after all what has he done ? Nothing-virtually NO IMPACT as a bowler, which is his main job, after all. But wait...No...look at his performance with the bat ...in the first test at TB , he starred with Brad Haddin in a 70+ last wicket partnership in the 2nd innings which almost won the match for Australia. He remained not out with 20 something very useful and timely runs, coming in at No.11 and soaked in almost 70-80 pressure balls from this top class English attack. In the 2nd test at Lords' , he was promoted to No.10 and hit a 35+ something , soaking in again 100+ pressure balls . He along with Peter Siddle and No.11 Rya

  • 2MikeGattings on July 23, 2013, 13:46 GMT

    Viewers, like batsmen, are entitled to treat bowling on its merits. Pattinson made little impression on a dead pitch in Nottingham and showed signs of adapting to the slope at Lord's in the 2nd innings. Sadly, the Australian observers who criticized Pattinson's bowling load have been proved correct. Perhaps he would have been better used as an out and out strike bowler in a 5 man attack.

    Pretty much everyone agrees Pattinson is a decent prospect and England will not be writing him off just yet, certainly not before the return series in Australia, should he be fit to play by then. Yes, some of the wind has gone out of the claim that Australia have the best pace attack in the world. Even so we can expect pitches down under that play to that perceived advantage.

    As for Anderson: there is a difference between leading an attack and carrying it, and it's do with inspiring the team at the crucial moments in a test and sharing the load between times.

  • venkatesh018 on July 23, 2013, 13:22 GMT

    Batsmen, when they play long innings, not only set a platform for their team winning but also give their bowlers valuable rest to come back fresh for their second innings. This rest period or the lack of it is very rarely discussed while analyzing bowlers' performances. Unfortunately Aussie bowlers aren't unlikely to get this "rest" anytime in the near future.

  • concerned_cricketer on July 23, 2013, 13:16 GMT

    It must be pretty heart rending for Pattinson. I do feel for the guy. The road to representing one's country is a long and hard one. As a fast bowler you are always going to be a bit prone to injury as the body has to wind up and then quickly unwind and release that ball in the best manner possible which is primarily what makes this game such a joy to watch. Good luck to Pattinson for a speedy recovery. Age is definitely on his side.

  • 2020sux on July 23, 2013, 13:14 GMT

    if Australia was a football team (whatever code) the administration, coaches and captain would have gone into this series acknowledging that this side is in a rebuilding phase after losing one of the greatest ever cricket sides to retirement. they would have claimed to be looking for strong performances from a team with future potential but that fans must be realistic in their expectations. Doing this would have taken some of the pressure off the players and given the administration more license to work on the team. This is going to take time if you doubt that go to the section on last seasons Sheffield shield and check the performances. Ponting comfortably tops this list and we all know what his form was like when he left the national team. Show some courage be honest and get on the task of building a new team.

  • Narkovian on July 23, 2013, 13:13 GMT

    Its not too much bowling in one match that caused it. There has to be an underlying problem there. He said himself he felt it on the second day. I hope he recovers and is able to continue a promising career. Some other great bowlers have had similar problems. D K Lillee for one. And look how good he became.

    I also agree with previous poster. It is a myth that these guys play too much cricket. Those in the past played FAR more. Take a look at the overs bowled by the likes of Trueman and Statham in an English season 50 years ago. Likewise the batsmen don't get enough competitive games. Just spend their whole time hanging around in the nets and physical jerks.. no good comes of that.

  • CapitalMarkets on July 23, 2013, 13:07 GMT

    I don't think anyone should rejoice in a young man being overbowled and breaking down and there is nothing wrong with a passionate approach to playing cricket. Pattinson is a useful bowler and it is unusual for a number 11 batsman to average 25 with the bat (this isn't much lower than many of the Australian specialist batsmen at the present time). I do think that Pattinson is entitled to be aggrieved about his brother's treatment (though it was probably not wise to articulate this) and anyone who appreciates excellence and effort (whether English, Australian or neutral) should wish the young man well. Looking forward to seeing what Cummins can do.

  • gbqdgj on July 23, 2013, 12:54 GMT

    You're quite right RandyOz...as always. Anderson carries the entire England attack on his back, apart from Swann, sometimes Broad, sometimes the third seamer, sometimes other part time bowlers....so yes indeed Anderson does do it all by himself which is why he has already got well over half of the 40 wickets Australia have lost in the series....oh wait, no he hasn't has he. Anderson is a fantastic asset for England (second best seamer in the world behind Steyn in my view) but don't ever think he does it by himself because he doesn't.

  • on July 23, 2013, 12:53 GMT

    Genuine sympathy for Mr Pattinson and I hope he fully recovers. Has the making of a fine cricketer and servant to Australia for many years to come... As an England supporter my delight at England being 2 up with 3 to play is tempered by how poor the Australian batting has been - lots of style but no technique, lots of bullishness but no bloody-mindedness. The bowlers as I expected have been up to the mark - Harris and Siddle especially are class acts, but were is the grit among the top order? I agree with king78787 about their choices of team changes, but will Lehmann have the strength of character to make them? This is also bearing in mind that England haven't been at their best either... big centuries from Cook and Trott can't be that far away.

  • 12thman on July 23, 2013, 12:50 GMT

    Ten to twenty years back this was unheard of. The players are being given all these energy supplement drinks which are definitely harming their system. Lillie, Thompson, the West Indies pack never suffered any of this rubbish. We never saw them drink all these energy boosted drinks on the boundary line between overs. There must be something in these drinks which is doing long term damage. Sports Science is definitely playing a bad part in all of this. Why can't these bowlers just drink normal water if they have to. Just go out and bowl your heart out and enjoy what you are doing. Those old fast bowlers of the 70s, 80s and 90s must be wondering what's wrong with the present lot. Look at Thompson at Lords the other day. He looked fit to bowl at least 4 overs in a twenty20 gme. Who'd say he was 60. Cricket administrators have got to rethink the way fast bowlers are treated nowadays. It's definitely not the workload. It has to be the regimen. Act fast before someone dies.

  • Essex_Man on July 23, 2013, 12:42 GMT

    The Australian set-up needs to manage all the players' workloads more effectively. It isn't just "bad luck" when these sort of injuries happen. There is another article on Cricinfo today about Pattinson and Siddle signing for the Melbourne Renegades for the Big Bash. Why would you want your overworked Test opening bowlers playing even more cricket in a meaningless domestic T20 tournament? Utter madness!

  • on July 23, 2013, 12:40 GMT

    The reason why so many young pace bowlers break down is simple: they do not play enough cricket, especially first class cricket. This lack starts in childhood with the restrictions on the number of overs those under 18 can bowl and continues into the professional game where far too much time is taken up with limited overs cricket which neither provides enough bowling and, especially T20, is constantly asking bowlers to bowl an over or two, then come back for an over, then have a break, then bowl one more over and so on.

    The other problem is medical monitoring. Players, not just bowlers, drop out at the slightest tear or hairline fracture. In the past players simply thought they had a sore finger or a tight muscle and played on - Les Jackson played with a leg strain for most of the 1958 season when he bowled off a shortened run and took 143 wickets @ 10.99 each.

  • king78787 on July 23, 2013, 12:39 GMT

    @RandyOz, so Swann's a part timer then?

  • Pyketts on July 23, 2013, 12:31 GMT

    @orangtan I agree, it's good to see he's backed up his boasts as to how he'll make Eng pay for how they treated his brother. At least Warne et al used to be able to back up their boasts.

    Not sure why he crying, all he's going to miss is continual beatings by the Eng batting line up.

    I'm sure Aus can wheel out another average bowler to take his place, from what I've seen it won't make much difference.

  • VVSR92 on July 23, 2013, 12:25 GMT

    patto consider yourselves lucky for not staying in england to undergo further embaressment . Hope that you return for the 2nd leg of ashes fully fit & firing as this ashes results are only cheerful or bitterful for a period of just 2months .

  • GeoffreysMother on July 23, 2013, 12:20 GMT

    goldeneraaus - not that many genuine England fans scoff, and most would have loved to see him play a full series. Many will have thought before the series that Australian media and many fans were overhyping Patterson as great as opposed to promising (and will have made fun of this - not Patterson). What we saw was a very promising fast bowler striving for consistency - as Finn does. As he says, once he has Steyn's experience (or Anderson's or Siddle's) he will be able to manage his workload and body better. Good luck to him - it's always good to see a Grimsby lad do well.

  • ReverseSweepIndia on July 23, 2013, 12:18 GMT

    When you are losing it looks like whole universe is conspiring against you. When we went Eng 2 years back, Zaheer got injured in first session. He was the only bowler we had and he could bowl a bit. The time he had been on the field, he had accounted for both the openers. The time he went out of field limping it looked like there went our chances crashed. Oldies took a while to realize that their time is up, Eng, good team they are, picked it up and took them to another level and then there was no coming back. One thing leads to another. Mickey get booted, Warner sent away, 4-5 openers having doubts in mind where they will play, no. 11 is there for batting rather than bowling, one of the best bowler going home injured. Best bowler of the side who hardly ever played 2 matches in succession already played one match without limping off so doubts will he lasts second one. Best batsman in side is not scoring anymore. Ah, I am not Australian, why I am ranting..

  • RandyOZ on July 23, 2013, 12:18 GMT

    Hopefully he turns into an Anderson, who carries the entire English attack on his back.

  • on July 23, 2013, 12:16 GMT

    Scuse the eternally optimistic Aussie streak in me but isnt the next test Australia's best chance of springing a surprise? England will be without a major attacking weapon of theirs (KP) and might take us very lightly. Michael Clarke maybe started on the road to some great scores in his last innings and if we include a proven wicket taking lineup of Siddle, Harris, Sayers and Lyon (sayers because he was prolific above all others in A games in Eng) then we could keep the Eng batters off balance. What we need is a big daddy hundred + 1 more very good score from any of our other batters and England could be under some real pressure! To do that what we need is a slightly more restrained approach from each batsmen at the start of their innings. Anyways stranger things have happened!

  • pb10677 on July 23, 2013, 12:14 GMT

    This is a classic case of why excessive scheduling can cause damage to players. That's a big loss to Australia, which they don't need.

    I'm an England fan, but I'm not scoffing as goldeneraus suggested some people may do, because I've seen Pattinson bowling in other series and he's a very promising prospect. And whilst it is of indirect benefit to England, I personally never like seeing players injured. If you're going to beat someone, you want them to be at their best and fielding their strongest team.

    Playing for Aus and wearing the baggy green clearly means so much to Pattinson from his interview: hopefully he can recover and recuperate in time for the first test at Brisbane in November. Looking forward to seeing him then.

  • Surajrises on July 23, 2013, 12:08 GMT

    If Australia continues with their poor batting skills, then we are going to see Ryan Harris too out of the series in the next match although it wouldn't matter because Aussies would have already lost the series! Really very sad to see Australian Cricket suffer like this. For me Australian Cricket Team always sounded like Dominance and Arrogance but now its become so weak that I cannot believe that Australian Cricket Team is gonna become the next West Indies Cricket Team once all the greats left they just couldn't get up. I really hope Cricket Australia can once again find a Hayden, Katich, Langer, Damien Martin, Gilchrist, Ponting, Warne, McGrath, Lee, Gillispee, Mark & Steve Waugh kind of players. They have to make their Domestic Cricket stronger and have to emphasise on Test Cricket more so that the batsmen can stay in the crease for a longer time and only that will improve their technique and temperament. Its high time that they started focusing in these things...

  • ReverseSweepIndia on July 23, 2013, 12:03 GMT

    Ironical but the problem is those who try hard goes back home injured and those one who do not try at all remain fit and hence in squad and in XI. He is a fearsome bowler in mode of Steyn though not in his class yet. But what Aus will put up now? Bird? Bowlers bowling in corridor to guys like Cook, Trott and Bell can keep doing that million years and they will be happy to not offer any shot. To get them out, you need to do things which Harris or Patto could have done.

  • orangtan on July 23, 2013, 12:02 GMT

    Is this the same young man who was sledging away and spouting fire and brimstone a few weeks ago vowing to avenge his brother's shabby treatment by the English selectors ? How come these young Aussie pacemen keep breaking down repeatedly, or is it a mental thing rather than physical problems?

  • king78787 on July 23, 2013, 12:01 GMT

    91 overs in a space of 15 days, facing 180 balls ( a 30 over session) must have completely taken it out of him. I think that the team needs a MASSIVE overhaul. Agar can bat but he can't bowl, Rogers and Watson get out after making good starts and Hughes is easily bogged down. Lyon in for Agar, Katich in for Rogers, Robson in for Watson, Warner in for Hughes.

  • milepost on July 23, 2013, 11:47 GMT

    He'll be back. Highlights what pressure the batting has put the bowlers under. Bat ugly and bat long, just get it done and get some runs guys. It sounds great to play aggressive cricket but it isn't working and all those ugly dismissals must make the bowlers want to hide under a bed. The crowd did genuinely find it amusing that Clarke said he thought they could still win the series. I don't think it is funny! The first match was close. The series could well be one all. But it isn't, it is 2-0 because England are outplaying us and scarily, having lived in England for 10 years, it's easy to see they are far from their best. This has not been quality ricket but let's hope for some class in number 3. I know England can play better.

  • coldcoffee123 on July 23, 2013, 11:39 GMT

    Come back stronger Patto. We know you will. Regarding the Chasm between domestic cricket in Aus and NZ, as against Eng, Ind, SA, see this: http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/current/match/637453.html and http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/current/match/647197.html and http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/match/637457.html

  • on July 23, 2013, 11:38 GMT

    My concern is more for his personal wellbeing rather than his wicket taking abilities. I hope he keeps a balanced view of the importance of his cricket vs his overall future wellbeing. His action looks very strenuous but I do hope he can live his dream of being a gun quick whilst being able to retire in reasonably good nick and without too much pain.

  • tjsimonsen on July 23, 2013, 11:31 GMT

    It's tough on him obviously. But Brett Lee suffered the same kind of injury early in his career if I remember correctly, and came back much stronger. Hopefully Pattinson can do the same.

  • goldeneraaus on July 23, 2013, 11:29 GMT

    English fans may scoff, because we haven't seen the best of Pattinson this series, but this is perhaps the most damaging thing our pathetic batting has caused. Pattinson is a tremendous fast bowler on song and is a big loss.. he is young and will return, hopefully in Aus, and on fast wickets (any really, see India series) he will be a handful, wish him a speedy recovery. Also losing one of our best batsman :p

  • YorkshirePudding on July 23, 2013, 11:20 GMT

    I suspect that it was a combination of the load he carried at Trent Bridge and the Lords, where he bowled 90 overs in the space of 10 days, add on his extra responsibility with the bat it will all stack up.

    I wish him a speedy recovery, but it will be 6-8 motnhs before hes 100% and bowling again depending on the severity.

  • YorkshirePudding on July 23, 2013, 11:20 GMT

    I suspect that it was a combination of the load he carried at Trent Bridge and the Lords, where he bowled 90 overs in the space of 10 days, add on his extra responsibility with the bat it will all stack up.

    I wish him a speedy recovery, but it will be 6-8 motnhs before hes 100% and bowling again depending on the severity.

  • goldeneraaus on July 23, 2013, 11:29 GMT

    English fans may scoff, because we haven't seen the best of Pattinson this series, but this is perhaps the most damaging thing our pathetic batting has caused. Pattinson is a tremendous fast bowler on song and is a big loss.. he is young and will return, hopefully in Aus, and on fast wickets (any really, see India series) he will be a handful, wish him a speedy recovery. Also losing one of our best batsman :p

  • tjsimonsen on July 23, 2013, 11:31 GMT

    It's tough on him obviously. But Brett Lee suffered the same kind of injury early in his career if I remember correctly, and came back much stronger. Hopefully Pattinson can do the same.

  • on July 23, 2013, 11:38 GMT

    My concern is more for his personal wellbeing rather than his wicket taking abilities. I hope he keeps a balanced view of the importance of his cricket vs his overall future wellbeing. His action looks very strenuous but I do hope he can live his dream of being a gun quick whilst being able to retire in reasonably good nick and without too much pain.

  • coldcoffee123 on July 23, 2013, 11:39 GMT

    Come back stronger Patto. We know you will. Regarding the Chasm between domestic cricket in Aus and NZ, as against Eng, Ind, SA, see this: http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/current/match/637453.html and http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/current/match/647197.html and http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/match/637457.html

  • milepost on July 23, 2013, 11:47 GMT

    He'll be back. Highlights what pressure the batting has put the bowlers under. Bat ugly and bat long, just get it done and get some runs guys. It sounds great to play aggressive cricket but it isn't working and all those ugly dismissals must make the bowlers want to hide under a bed. The crowd did genuinely find it amusing that Clarke said he thought they could still win the series. I don't think it is funny! The first match was close. The series could well be one all. But it isn't, it is 2-0 because England are outplaying us and scarily, having lived in England for 10 years, it's easy to see they are far from their best. This has not been quality ricket but let's hope for some class in number 3. I know England can play better.

  • king78787 on July 23, 2013, 12:01 GMT

    91 overs in a space of 15 days, facing 180 balls ( a 30 over session) must have completely taken it out of him. I think that the team needs a MASSIVE overhaul. Agar can bat but he can't bowl, Rogers and Watson get out after making good starts and Hughes is easily bogged down. Lyon in for Agar, Katich in for Rogers, Robson in for Watson, Warner in for Hughes.

  • orangtan on July 23, 2013, 12:02 GMT

    Is this the same young man who was sledging away and spouting fire and brimstone a few weeks ago vowing to avenge his brother's shabby treatment by the English selectors ? How come these young Aussie pacemen keep breaking down repeatedly, or is it a mental thing rather than physical problems?

  • ReverseSweepIndia on July 23, 2013, 12:03 GMT

    Ironical but the problem is those who try hard goes back home injured and those one who do not try at all remain fit and hence in squad and in XI. He is a fearsome bowler in mode of Steyn though not in his class yet. But what Aus will put up now? Bird? Bowlers bowling in corridor to guys like Cook, Trott and Bell can keep doing that million years and they will be happy to not offer any shot. To get them out, you need to do things which Harris or Patto could have done.

  • Surajrises on July 23, 2013, 12:08 GMT

    If Australia continues with their poor batting skills, then we are going to see Ryan Harris too out of the series in the next match although it wouldn't matter because Aussies would have already lost the series! Really very sad to see Australian Cricket suffer like this. For me Australian Cricket Team always sounded like Dominance and Arrogance but now its become so weak that I cannot believe that Australian Cricket Team is gonna become the next West Indies Cricket Team once all the greats left they just couldn't get up. I really hope Cricket Australia can once again find a Hayden, Katich, Langer, Damien Martin, Gilchrist, Ponting, Warne, McGrath, Lee, Gillispee, Mark & Steve Waugh kind of players. They have to make their Domestic Cricket stronger and have to emphasise on Test Cricket more so that the batsmen can stay in the crease for a longer time and only that will improve their technique and temperament. Its high time that they started focusing in these things...