The Investec Ashes 2013 August 8, 2013

ICC confirms Hot Spot inventor concerns

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The ICC has confirmed that the inventor of Hot Spot, Warren Brennan, raised concerns with them this week over the effect of bat coatings on the technology, which detects edges using thermal imaging, but that he was warned against suggesting players were deliberately trying to cheat the system.

Although Brennan has not explicitly stated any such worries in public and has declined to comment, he sent a tweet on Monday to former England captain Michael Vaughan that said: "Michael, it's time you investigate why players are using fibreglass tape on the edges of their bats."

Channel Nine also reported on Thursday that Brennan had raised his "serious concerns" with the ICC about flaws in the system. The Channel Nine report stated that Brennan feared silicone tape on bats could fool the technology by dulling the Hot Spot and ensuring no mark shows up on the edge even if a batsman has nicked the ball.

Nine reported that testing was carried out, which showed that a second layer of tape had the dulling effect. Geoff Allardice, the ICC's general manager of cricket operations, met with team management of both England and Australia in Durham on Thursday, and the ICC has announced Hot Spot will continue to be used for the rest of this series.

Allardice confirmed that he and Brennan had met in Melbourne on Friday to discuss the series and Brennan afterwards sent an email raising concerns.

"He followed up with an email to me on Monday suggesting that they'd looked at some clips and that coatings on the bat might have been dulling down the Hot Spot mark," Allardice said. "He made us aware of that. On Tuesday, he did some testing and informed us of that. He also advised us that he was intending to make a media statement.

"We talked about the timing of that. It's his company, his product, he's free to say whatever he likes in the media. We were expecting to see something either yesterday or today.

"We didn't really talk about the inference that players were doing it deliberately to try and beat the Hot Spot. I think we did warn him that if he made a statement along those lines, if the inference was that the players were trying to cheat the Hot Spot system he would need some strong evidence to support that. There is no evidence to support that assertion and certainly from the comments of the teams you can see that they don't believe that that happens."

Both Michael Clarke and Alastair Cook have vehemently denied that any of their players have deliberately used tape in an effort to fool Hot Spot and the teams are happy for the technology to continue to be used throughout this series. When Allardice was asked if the ICC would consider changing its playing conditions to prevent the use of such tape on bats, he said "a lot more evidence" would be required before any such move was made.

"I think it's very early days, in that players have had coatings on bats, and manufacturers' stickers on bats, and reinforcing tape on bats for forever and a day," Allardice said. "We listened to Warren's view and there may be something in it but I'd think we'd want to gain a lot more evidence before we'd look at rule changes or anything like that.

"This was a theory that he put up on Monday this week. He did some tests that he felt supported that theory. We would like to see some more evidence from on the ground with players in action to support that. At this stage we've got no intention of changing the rules in the short term."

Brydon Coverdale is an assistant editor at ESPNcricinfo. He tweets here

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • on August 9, 2013, 1:51 GMT

    Use of tape in the edges of bats have been used by batsmen long before hotspot or any kind of technology was introduced. They are mainly used to maintain the integrity of the bat and prevent its edge from cracking. Accusing a player of cheating just because he used tape is far fetched. I hope ICC will device newer methods to detect edges using hotspot even with taped bats.

  • Thegimp on August 9, 2013, 1:18 GMT

    I have used tape on my bats since time began, I bought a bat for my son two weeks ago and it came with a coating for protection. Both instances are to create longevity however, given the choice and an unlimited bat budget ($700 AUD for a bat!!!!!), I would prefer a bat without the tape. As well as dulling edges it slightly dulls the middle. A clean bat face is more crisp. Given that First Class and International players have bats specially made, have four or five in their kit and have no concerns about longevity and that hot spot is only used at International level I would ban the use of artificial coatings at First Class level. DRS is here to stay and it is only by making it better and more reliable will we embrace it.

  • Biso on August 11, 2013, 5:40 GMT

    Things are getting more clear now. BCCI is unwilling to patronise the DRS firms with their less than effective technologies, as on date. The firms expect DRS to be patronised and all future improvements will take place with time while cricket at the highest level will be a de-facto trial ground. BCCI expects implementation to be post adequate trials and modifications and the systems to be reliable and provide results with high level of significance. Obviously, these trails are to be at the cost of the firms. However, there are many in ICC who have disagreed with BCCI and have gone about implementing the DRS in a high handed and ham handed manner. The results are now for all to see.

  • Biso on August 11, 2013, 1:52 GMT

    @Jayesh Patel. I agree. We are now seeing the results of the business decision proposed by the firms and the hurried / unscientific / unmanaged acceptance for implementation by the user. Takes two to tango. We can as well read between the lines. Why do you think BCCI was not in favour of DRS as it is now?

  • on August 10, 2013, 15:02 GMT

    The ultimate UDRS should include both Snicko and Hot Spot. No one could cheat Snicko at the moment

  • sarangsrk on August 10, 2013, 14:45 GMT

    Assuming the tape on edges can fool hot spot, I would not agree with KP's logic of "why would I use a tape if it can get me out on an inside egde LBW decision". Players can easily use the tape on outer edge and leave inside edge blank. This is not at all to say that KP or any other player is lying/cheating or doing this at all. If indeed tape is the root cause, ICC can ask players not to use it. There are lot of regulations or rules even now with what players can use even from marketing view, why not to ban something which avoids fair play? Strictly my opinion only.

  • RAJEESHKUMAR on August 10, 2013, 13:11 GMT

    pieterson commented about the allegation: why I would use the tape on my bat to hide any nick which may save me on a false lbw decision.

  • on August 10, 2013, 11:19 GMT

    Maybe the tape is the reason that Clarke and a few other leading players call fot the review so quickly, when they have clearly hit it.

  • on August 10, 2013, 3:52 GMT

    Tapes have been used since time immemorial. How can you outlaw or curtail it? Obviously hotspot has issues with it. It should not be used till fully tested. Please read injunction with my previous comments.

  • on August 10, 2013, 3:44 GMT

    Technology is not full proof. It is often a business decision by the inventors to get it accepted without thorough testing. Its only when its in use, its limitations are realized. I hope ICC and the cricket fraternity will realize India's position now rather than join in the bandwagon to railroad the technology in to get it accepted. Bring in new technology where there is ample evidence. The technology is an umpire aid after all they are the adjudicators not the players! There can be a review system but umpires must start to make use of the technology in their decision spontaneously only then can we eliminate the error rate that is seen in abundance. To err is human! Aim to eliminate errors in catches,runouts & front foot no balls. We will never remove doubt in LBWs because there is doubt in the predictive path-pitches are very dynamic. Use snickos & audio with the aid of Hawke eye. There should always be a benefit of doubt left to the batsman. Heard of innocent until proven guilty!!!

  • on August 9, 2013, 1:51 GMT

    Use of tape in the edges of bats have been used by batsmen long before hotspot or any kind of technology was introduced. They are mainly used to maintain the integrity of the bat and prevent its edge from cracking. Accusing a player of cheating just because he used tape is far fetched. I hope ICC will device newer methods to detect edges using hotspot even with taped bats.

  • Thegimp on August 9, 2013, 1:18 GMT

    I have used tape on my bats since time began, I bought a bat for my son two weeks ago and it came with a coating for protection. Both instances are to create longevity however, given the choice and an unlimited bat budget ($700 AUD for a bat!!!!!), I would prefer a bat without the tape. As well as dulling edges it slightly dulls the middle. A clean bat face is more crisp. Given that First Class and International players have bats specially made, have four or five in their kit and have no concerns about longevity and that hot spot is only used at International level I would ban the use of artificial coatings at First Class level. DRS is here to stay and it is only by making it better and more reliable will we embrace it.

  • Biso on August 11, 2013, 5:40 GMT

    Things are getting more clear now. BCCI is unwilling to patronise the DRS firms with their less than effective technologies, as on date. The firms expect DRS to be patronised and all future improvements will take place with time while cricket at the highest level will be a de-facto trial ground. BCCI expects implementation to be post adequate trials and modifications and the systems to be reliable and provide results with high level of significance. Obviously, these trails are to be at the cost of the firms. However, there are many in ICC who have disagreed with BCCI and have gone about implementing the DRS in a high handed and ham handed manner. The results are now for all to see.

  • Biso on August 11, 2013, 1:52 GMT

    @Jayesh Patel. I agree. We are now seeing the results of the business decision proposed by the firms and the hurried / unscientific / unmanaged acceptance for implementation by the user. Takes two to tango. We can as well read between the lines. Why do you think BCCI was not in favour of DRS as it is now?

  • on August 10, 2013, 15:02 GMT

    The ultimate UDRS should include both Snicko and Hot Spot. No one could cheat Snicko at the moment

  • sarangsrk on August 10, 2013, 14:45 GMT

    Assuming the tape on edges can fool hot spot, I would not agree with KP's logic of "why would I use a tape if it can get me out on an inside egde LBW decision". Players can easily use the tape on outer edge and leave inside edge blank. This is not at all to say that KP or any other player is lying/cheating or doing this at all. If indeed tape is the root cause, ICC can ask players not to use it. There are lot of regulations or rules even now with what players can use even from marketing view, why not to ban something which avoids fair play? Strictly my opinion only.

  • RAJEESHKUMAR on August 10, 2013, 13:11 GMT

    pieterson commented about the allegation: why I would use the tape on my bat to hide any nick which may save me on a false lbw decision.

  • on August 10, 2013, 11:19 GMT

    Maybe the tape is the reason that Clarke and a few other leading players call fot the review so quickly, when they have clearly hit it.

  • on August 10, 2013, 3:52 GMT

    Tapes have been used since time immemorial. How can you outlaw or curtail it? Obviously hotspot has issues with it. It should not be used till fully tested. Please read injunction with my previous comments.

  • on August 10, 2013, 3:44 GMT

    Technology is not full proof. It is often a business decision by the inventors to get it accepted without thorough testing. Its only when its in use, its limitations are realized. I hope ICC and the cricket fraternity will realize India's position now rather than join in the bandwagon to railroad the technology in to get it accepted. Bring in new technology where there is ample evidence. The technology is an umpire aid after all they are the adjudicators not the players! There can be a review system but umpires must start to make use of the technology in their decision spontaneously only then can we eliminate the error rate that is seen in abundance. To err is human! Aim to eliminate errors in catches,runouts & front foot no balls. We will never remove doubt in LBWs because there is doubt in the predictive path-pitches are very dynamic. Use snickos & audio with the aid of Hawke eye. There should always be a benefit of doubt left to the batsman. Heard of innocent until proven guilty!!!

  • gsingh7 on August 10, 2013, 3:37 GMT

    even the inventor goes on live tv to claim technology is vulnerable. wud icc still enforce it in all 100% of games in future ? i believe this is end of hotspot as we know. snicko is suspicious as well. afterall bcci is not 100% wrong and evil .why pay princely sum for 2 reviews which cud be compromised by 2cm of silicon fibre tape on outside edge of bats? preserve the inside edge , rather make it rough deliberately.

  • on August 10, 2013, 2:58 GMT

    Iinventor of Hot Spot, Warren Brennan feared silicone tape on bats could fool the technology by dulling the Hot Spot and ensuring no mark shows up on the edge even if a batsman has nicked the ball.Its a clear cut indication of hot spot flaw ,what i think by my self that hot spot should be stopped from cricket world from now on wards.

  • Rahulbose on August 10, 2013, 1:09 GMT

    The howler review system that produces more howlers and controversy continues. Looks like the Hot spot inventor has never watched a game of cricket. An edge not being detected can be advantageous to either side. You will escape close nicks that are caught but will be penalized on lbw calls.

  • Vijay_P_S on August 10, 2013, 0:51 GMT

    @Dravid_Gravitas, you mean disband DRS and let us move backwards? Heat is heat no matter how it is generated. Tank generates more heat but you are either looking from space or from several Kms away. Friction may generate less heat but the camera is zoomed right on to the bat.

  • getsetgopk on August 10, 2013, 0:35 GMT

    Tapes are nothing new, whats a bit disappointing is that why such tests weren't done earlier? I mean this should've been hotspot 101 to test is for not just wood but other materials and list its degree of impact on various tapes. I suppose the dulling impact would most definitely be different for different materials as different material provides different degree of fraction upon impact. Personally I think this should have been done before introducing hotspot and ICC should have clear cut rules for use of tapes and coatings on bats. A bit sloppy there from the inventor when he raises the issue in the middle of a series, what can the board or ICC do about it in such a short period of time? Nothing can be done for now.

  • 2MikeGattings on August 10, 2013, 0:27 GMT

    Why did Brennan not raise these concerns before HotSpot was adopted? The obvious reason is that he is trying to deflect blame from the system's failures onto the players.

  • Baundele on August 9, 2013, 22:38 GMT

    Not detecting an edge does not help the batsmen in close LBW decisions. They can be given LBW even when they nick it. I wonder why they would take such risky measures to avoid getting caught behind.

  • PACERONE on August 9, 2013, 18:22 GMT

    If most bats are made with tape on the edges would you not think that when testing was done for hot spot that some of these bats would of been tested.I still maintain that Michael Vaughn once mentioned vaseline been used to negate hotspot.Whatever became of that statement?Why did he make it if he did not know that there was a way to negate the system? At the cost of a bat they should be made to last without reinforcement been needed.

  • on August 9, 2013, 16:48 GMT

    one thing for sure is that drs has made the game more exciting. it really improves decisions and allows the umpires to make the calls and only overturns it if they are poor calls. it truly is perfect. DRS thank you for making the game so much better.

  • delpihero on August 9, 2013, 16:34 GMT

    Its up to the ICC to outlaw tape on bats when the DRS is in use. Cant see why people are talking about they use tape in club cricket. There is no DRS in county cricket let alone club cricket.

  • skarthik345 on August 9, 2013, 15:27 GMT

    I'd agree to ban the tapes if that is what is limiting the technology. DRS should stay here, it will allow to lessen the howlers.

  • McGorium on August 9, 2013, 14:16 GMT

    This is just stupid: If tapes cause hotspot to fail, it's not the tape that's the issue, it's hotspot. Go fix the system, instead of complaining to the ICC that players are using tape. Using tape -- any kind of tape-- on the bat is legal. What next, that wood of a particular species of willow should be used because hotspot works best with it, or that a certain wood cannot be used because hotspot can't tell an edge on that wood? Or that I can't oil/varnish the bat because poor hotspot can't handle it? Hotspot is a useful tool to get rid of obvious howlers, not to make a call on a faint feather-edge to the keeper. Tape or no tape, it'll work for the former case. It has always been unreliable for the latter, and coming up with ways to fix this by effectively changing the rules of the game makes no sense. DRS was intended to fix obvious howlers (like inside edge being given out LBW), and hotspot helps, but isn't strictly necessary for that. Optimizing the 50-50 call is a waste of time.

  • Dravid_Pujara_Gravitas on August 9, 2013, 14:09 GMT

    This is an utter waste of space and time. Disband DRS and let us move forward. You can't use military technology of heat detection on a cricket field. Where is the similarity between heat generated by a military tanker and the heat generated by the friction of a ball against the faintest edge of a bat? End this dubious 'technology' in cricket. This ain't a circus or International Cricket is no guinea pig!

  • ThyrSaadam on August 9, 2013, 14:08 GMT

    Wow what a turn around for the use of technology, for a very long time i never understood BCCI's position, but after this series i feel they have been vindicated, although i do smell an ulterior motive behind BCCI's refusal to accept DRS. I think much of the confusion has been caused by the lack of evidence in over turning the on field umps decision even if it was wrong in the first place. ICC is making a blunder by not going 100 % through with its implementation of technology, i.e. why not just give the review umpire all the rights to make a correct decision rather than to just find evidence to over turn an onfield decision?

  • shamlaatu on August 9, 2013, 14:06 GMT

    Isn't snickometer a million times better, effective, and conclusive than hotspot technology? I am sure it's less expensive as well.

  • cricanalyst05 on August 9, 2013, 13:34 GMT

    Just get the whole DRS in dustbin and follow the traditional way...Respect the umpires decision.

  • on August 9, 2013, 13:16 GMT

    I am not an expert but I believe the thermal emissivity of a bat can be changed by modifying its surface. More importantly it can be reduced relatively so that Infra red cameras pick less after collision between bat and ball. This is a drawback if the bats are not standard. This means a country who can pore more research in this will have advantage in fooling the system. Having said that I am not implying that this has already been done knowingly. I am just saying that I believe it can be done.

  • Chopman on August 9, 2013, 12:55 GMT

    Hotspot is too unreliable. It should be eliminated from the factors used to review a decision. The entire DRS is being tainted by this flawed technology. If its dependability is improved then it can be reconsidered.

  • Ray24 on August 9, 2013, 12:46 GMT

    I'd agree to ban the tapes if that is what is limiting the technology. DRS should stay here, it will allow to lessen the howlers.

  • Prabhash1985 on August 9, 2013, 12:18 GMT

    It just says technology is not matured enough, and still human eye is better than technology.

  • yorkshire-86 on August 9, 2013, 10:55 GMT

    About the 'hotspot is not 100% accurate so it should not be used' - umpires are nowhere near 100% either so does that mean umpires should be dispensed with?

  • Bazingaaaaaaaaaa on August 9, 2013, 10:47 GMT

    almost since the dawn of drs era sky tv commentators have been ribbing and ridiculing the BCCI for standing up against DRS. Not a word now from them. Who is the monkey now???

  • Sheepsteeth on August 9, 2013, 10:07 GMT

    Agnimile you are no doubt being deliberately antagonistic. Firstly both sides have been accused of this by the inventor of the system, England have only been accused of cheating by the Nine Network in Australia who named people (Pietersen) with no evidence or proof. I am not surprised they want an apology, quite frankly it stinks of looking for excuses for losing a series. As everyone has mentioned, tape has been used for decades. Vaseline definitely has not.

  • Haleos on August 9, 2013, 9:57 GMT

    @ HawK89 - Its not the cost. As a batsman I know one would like to use the same bat that one is comfortable in unless it is broken. Confidence forms a big part of the game. Couch coaches would not understand that of course.

  • Haleos on August 9, 2013, 9:56 GMT

    And how in did players come to know about such a loophole? I am with the players here. We have been using tapes since ages. Hotspot inventors should have considered that for testing before releasing the product. Also ICC should have looked at all the possible drawbacks.

  • Ropsh on August 9, 2013, 9:10 GMT

    Pretty clear that, like HawkEye, the inventor/owner of a discredited technology is desperately slinging mud around in the hope that some of it sticks and he can continue to fraudulently peddle this failed "divining rod".

  • McCricket_ on August 9, 2013, 9:00 GMT

    So: 1) there are no rules preventing the use of a covering on a bat, such as Extratec 2) there are claims that any film-like covering will reduce friction and diminish Hotpot evidence 3) such films will generally, but not always, wrap around the edges 4) outside edges might have the advantage in not showing thin nicks, but inside edges would be disadvantageous in reviewing a bat-pad lbw 5) most players use, or have used such a covering

    So what?

    Until and unless certain coverings are outlawed, there is quite possibly nothing being used now that wasn't in use before Hotspot. A simple course of action is for umpires to ensure no batsman uses a covering that wraps onto the outside edge but not the inside edge. Meanwhile, ICC and Hotspot should investigate whether any new coverings are being used that provide a particular advantage compared to the regular/old coverings, and determine if any need to be banned. The inside edge/outside edge check should suffice until then.

  • on August 9, 2013, 9:00 GMT

    The concept of using drs is to reduce umpiring mistakes , to an extend technology can achieve this . Hot spot is not 100 percent sure , so as snikco is , so I think icc should take both out of the drs concept , as it may lead to controversies . Ball tracking is good for lbw decisions for other things such as edges , I think third umpire should have a look at slow motion videos from different angles and have look at the sound camera.

  • agnimile on August 9, 2013, 8:20 GMT

    I remember Michael Vaughan's tweet a few years ago accusing Laxman of using vaseline on his bat to avoid detection by HotSpot. Now that English players have been accused of pretty much the same by Australian media, the English cricket establishment is in uproar!

    Looks like the shoe is on the other foot.

  • Green_and_Gold on August 9, 2013, 8:04 GMT

    Seems odd that players will go to such extents just to fool hotspot. I was always told that hard edges were better so that if you did edge you would get better value for it. Thats why bat makers and sellers say to get a bat with hart wood on the outside edge. Ive also seen a lot of instances where the edge has saved a batsman on an LBW appeal.

  • HawK89 on August 9, 2013, 7:47 GMT

    Bats cost next to nothing these days. Tape/protection should be used to a minimal, otherwise should bowlers be allowed to use a product to preserve the shine on the ball?

  • colc on August 9, 2013, 7:42 GMT

    "Snicko" seems to be a more reliable piece of evidence than Hotspot. With regards to tape, bat edges are now so thick, and bats so soft,that they get damaged fairly easily. I've always taped the edges of any new bat before I've used it.

  • on August 9, 2013, 6:25 GMT

    Brennan brought the matter up with the ICC. Channel 9 reported this. Where's the problem?

    The major concern should be training for umpires doing the third umpire job. This is getting to be a specialist position and should be treated that way, not rotating unpires around between field and tv umpires. The specialist approach works for rugby union television referees.

  • pat_one_back on August 9, 2013, 6:21 GMT

    Not that anyone's doing anything untoward but look out for brighter white dots this test! Now, how many recent DRS 'shockers' (sick of the word howler) can be explained under suspicion of 'cool edging'. 3rd Umps have been very interested in the sound track even without 'snicko'.

  • on August 9, 2013, 5:55 GMT

    For those who don't know how the Hot-Spot works: It just detects the warmness of any surface on a black-white scale. So as the ball nicks or hits the bat, that particular area becomes White(warm). This can easily be by-passed if someone uses a coating which will keep the temperature of the struck surface intact (which I think is currently being on the rise). #Hail-Dhoni

  • on August 9, 2013, 5:53 GMT

    This story got up as 'batsmen are taping their bats to avoid hotspot' and 'the ICC are pursuing the matter' without a skerrick of evidence for either claim. Channel Nine agree they ran both parts of the story -- but refuse to apologise, saying they have done nothing wrong! They thus ignore the ICC's absolute rebuttal that they are pursuing the matter. AND they claim that they did not originally accuse any batsman of cheating. Another porky. In fact, they specifically mentioned 'concerns surrounding Pietersen,' referring to his second innings dismissal in the Third Ashes Test.

    Channel Nine's integrity = a contradiction in terms. QED.

    And as for DRS, the umpires' training need attention far more urgently than the technology.

  • jango_moh on August 9, 2013, 5:25 GMT

    @Visvang Frikkie... bcos hotspot is 80% effective, u say its 80% better than wrong decisions??? lol... with DRS out completely, until now we've had around 75-80% accuracy, then what value does it add????? apart from creating controversy and confusion!!! im indian, and def not a big bcci fan, but blindly supporting DRS is stupid... pls dont listen to commentators, use ur own judgement... u support technology, but DRS just came in suddenly using hotspot and other technology, and from the start itself, it was promoted widely by sky commentators especially... i feel there needs to be more testing done before being used in TESTS!!!! i wud argue that the same level of efficiency can be produced by just using snicko and regular replays!!!!

  • himanshu.team on August 9, 2013, 5:20 GMT

    It is outrageous to expect players not having any tapes on the bats simply because it prevents detecting a hot-spot. The players have been using it since ages now. Despite the money and number of bats they carry, they still have a favourite bat and would like to increase its life as much as they can. If hot spot fails to pick up an edge due to these tapes, better not have the hot-spot for detecting edges. Improve the snickometer, do something else or simply agree to give the batsman the benefit of doubt. Changing the playing conditions to better suit technology form one firm is unfair on players, audience and cricket in general.

  • David_Bofinger on August 9, 2013, 5:06 GMT

    If you want the heat conducted away fast, so there's no hot spot, then near-ideal would be an aluminium bat. Denis Lillee queered that pitch by getting the aluminum bat banned. If he did it to help the fast bowlers of the next generation then I salute his prescience.

  • on August 9, 2013, 5:02 GMT

    @timohyj: Really a better place without it? Hoptspot is not the problem, the Umpires are! How many crap decisions have been made by the third umpire even though there has been clear evidence by hotspot? Also why would a batsman try and cover the edges of his bat if it would save him in a tight LBW decision? This is a storm in a teacup and is playing into the BCCI's hands combined with the fact that the ICC has made a monumental cockup of how to use the technology! Even if hotspot is only 80% effective is that not an 80% improvement on wrong decisions? The reason the BCCI won't adopt it is clear, by not using it, it allows them(India) to pressurize the umpires into making poor decisions and there's no way the opposition review the decision!

  • on August 9, 2013, 4:58 GMT

    they blamed to kumar dharmasena!!! hahah :D

  • bobmartin on August 9, 2013, 4:57 GMT

    I'm suspicious... I've noticed in several close-ups from the stumpcam that some players bats have a single short strip of something on the outside edge of the bat, but not on the inside. If this is "technology fooling tape" it makes sense.. since most snicks that end in dismissal come from the outside edge, and you don't want those to register, whereas most snicks that save you from an LBW decision are inside edges,w hich you obviously do want to register. There's nothing in laws forbidding the use of tape to reinforce, repair or protect so no-one is breaking the law per se. All that is needed is an amendment to the law or the playing regulations.

  • on August 9, 2013, 4:42 GMT

    Thought - if batsmen are trying to hide edges, won't that count against them if they are given out lbw when they have edged the ball. Swings and rouindabouts??

  • screamingeagle on August 9, 2013, 4:39 GMT

    OK, shall we just keep the hot spot aside for a minute and ask ICC if they would be looking at conducting a course for the 'elite' umpires on common sense? It seems like they believe they can do anything and technology will save them. A lack of responsibility, if you can say that. As far as hot spot goes, it is a work in progress and over dependence will only create problems. At this stage anyway.

  • on August 9, 2013, 4:04 GMT

    Or, the ICC is raising a hornet's nest to defend their useless umpires.

  • timohyj on August 9, 2013, 3:55 GMT

    wouldn't the whole world just be a better place if DRS had never been invented. Maybe the BCCI isn't so bad after all

  • DeepBackwardSquare on August 9, 2013, 2:47 GMT

    crock spot.. fibreglass tape, or any tape available sometimes, has been used on bats by cricketers at all levels since willow started cracking. which came first, the cracks or the technology? possibly cracks in the technology, like R&D? he's tried to sell it as an absolute solution which it clearly isn't. EnglishCricket you are spot on. stop the howlers.

  • TRAM on August 9, 2013, 2:35 GMT

    Call the inventor who invented strong tapes that are also good conductors of heat.

  • IndianEagle on August 9, 2013, 1:50 GMT

    as i said earlier (that comment did not publish) most batsmen trying to make use of hotspot flaw (failed to show very thin edge). Warner himself admits he had nicked. believe this, since he knows that flaw, he referred it to 3rd umpire and he was lucky. These kind of situation will arise in coming tests too bcz nothing improved in DRS technology. According to me both ICC and BCCI are same, bullying towards each other. ICC refusing to accept flaws and BCCI are refusing to use at all. inbetween Cricket lovers like us are totally lost faith in ICC which we were believing make drs better. (since they controlling cricket)

  • ODI_BestFormOfCricket on August 9, 2013, 1:29 GMT

    i am wondering why icc still insisting boards to use drs technology. Hot spot failed atleast twice in an innings and with snicko not in drs the kind of problem that happened in last three tests continue to happen in coming days. Nothing has improved inbetween days in drs technology. Wake up ICC, throw away ego, accept the flaws in the technology. Trail drs in A level for few years, make it better. I m looking forward better than this.

  • jmcilhinney on August 9, 2013, 1:27 GMT

    @IndiaNumeroUno on (August 8, 2013, 20:00 GMT), please do exaggerate some more. It really does make your case seem far more credible.

  • DRS_Flawed_NeedsImprovement on August 9, 2013, 1:10 GMT

    so, from the tweet it is true that some thing wrong. (something true about silicon tape).

  • CricShanghai on August 9, 2013, 1:07 GMT

    I totally agree with EnglishCricket, get on with it. The technology is here to stay and more are coming to enhance our entertainment, we all just make sure the (1) it's for the right purposes, the third umpires didn't do it right for a couple of times last test, it's not out for Khawaja, and benefit of doubt for KP, (2) to enhance the entertainment aspect of the game and (3) remove howlers, and hopefully, the umpires do not hide behind the technology in fear of making mistakes ...enjoy cricket the way we want to enjoy!

  • on August 9, 2013, 0:51 GMT

    Exactly people have been using tape and fibreglass on bats to preserve favourite bats well before the technology came into use. You would have thought all this would have been trialled and tested by ICC and the manufacturers, instead of coming up for excuses of failing system. What should be the biggest concern to the ICC is its umpires don't know how to apply the system properly. Hot spot was irrelevant in say the Khawaja dismissal which needed just common sense! Btw I'd like to hear ICC explain KP's dismissal in 1st innings, or Trott in 2nd Innings of 1st Test. Both instances hot spot showed the batsmen hit it, but the 3rd umpire still gave them out!

  • on August 9, 2013, 0:42 GMT

    Even if there is any truth in the Silicon tape rumors, nothing can or should be done about it.

    Bats are always taped, right from the time knights were saving young princess' from the dragon.

    So, if it can reduce the effectiveness of hot spot, it simply means hotspot is not foolproof with the current demands of Cricket playing conditions. Full stop.

    Improve the technology, ICC.

  • on August 9, 2013, 0:23 GMT

    I'd be surprised if hot spot isn't given the boot after this series

  • Someguy on August 9, 2013, 0:00 GMT

    @Ashwin Panemangalore - I agree with everything you said, except for "drop Hot Spot". Just because it's not perfect doesn't mean get rid of it completely. We know that a faint edge doesn't always show up, but often they do, so why get rid of the technology? If it shows a mark, we know right away there was an edge and it's job is done. If it doesn't show an edge the video and audio gets examined as if there was no hotspot anyway, looking for evidence to overturn or uphold the original decision. I see no reason to get rid of it completely.

    Peope seem to forget that DRS is only there to get rid of the "howlers", it's not their to overturn 50/50 calls.

  • Big_Chikka on August 8, 2013, 23:52 GMT

    one thing i'm not getting is with all the free bats etc these guys get why do they need to worry about edges, i thought that was for poor folk?

  • Rowayton on August 8, 2013, 23:47 GMT

    No need to get rid of hot spot. Everybody just needs to accept that the presence of hot spot indicates bat on ball - the absence of hot spot proves nothing one way or the other. And I am scientifically ignorant, so I don't know if this is a sensible suggestion, but could we get away from looking for hot spot on the bat and start looking for it on the ball instead?

  • funkybluesman on August 8, 2013, 23:44 GMT

    I've seen things about this including sentences like "DRS has failed to pickup nicks in this series", but where is the evidence of that. It's basically someone who thinks someone edged the ball, all the video evidence including hotspot shows no edge, so instead of admitting they were wrong they claim the technology must be wrong.

    Fibreglass tape and similar have been used on bats for a long time. I personally prefer keeping the wood clean and oiling the bat, but many bats are sold with the whole face and edges covered in a protective cover. It used to just be the cheaper ones, but these days they often will do it even with the top test quality bats claiming it doesn't make them any worse.

    You don't change the bat rules because someone brings in a technology that says "we can detect edges if bats aren't taped, so change the rules to make taping bats illegal". The technology needs to fit with the rules, not change the rules to fit the technology.

  • IAS2009 on August 8, 2013, 23:19 GMT

    please get rid of DRS, with all this fiasco going on, usually in a test match there are some bad decision, i don't think DRS is eliminating any bad decision actually it is creating bad decision out of nothing and controversies, i give at least credit to BCCI to stand against bringing flawed a system that is not better than existing umpires, some of the ball's path suggested by DRS is mind boggling and utter non sense, Elite panel of umpires are good and should be officiating without DRS, last Indian season with 10 test matches did not create that many controversies as compared to 3 ashes test because of poor DRS decision. Neutral umpires are not cheaters, just live with the occasional poor decisions they are human, DRS is killing the excitement of appeal and originality of game. Australian and English Board should stop advocating for a flawed system.

  • TengaZool on August 8, 2013, 22:59 GMT

    DRS - The System is an absolute joke. Technology may have its limitations - that's ok, but the way the system has been implemented is beyond belief. It has been said time and again that the technology had not been tested as much as it should have been before implementation. FIFA had commissioned EMPA to conduct extensive tests before implementing Goal Line Technology. During ITF testing in 2006 Hawk-Eye passed a number of stringent parameters before being implemented into the TENNIS world. What tests have ICC conducted? Have they consolidated their findings and trained their umpires enough to use technology correctly? Have they defined the process on how to use the technological information? Didn't we have this same discussion when India toured England and Michael Vaughan accused Laxman of using Vaseline and the inventor said the only thing that would make a difference is the use of tapes? And here we are again having the same discussion without anything being fixed. ICC IS A JOKE.

  • KingOwl on August 8, 2013, 22:19 GMT

    I would like to know whether these types of tape have started appearing recently and if so why. Someone needs to ask the players the reasons. May be there is a good reason. If there isn't, then of course there will be suspicions.

  • __PK on August 8, 2013, 22:04 GMT

    Noone ever listens to the experts. arvind.pancha,l read the last paragraph again. They've done the tests already. But the ICC are using wishy-washy language to hide it "He did some tests that he felt supported that theory." Rubbish. I bet Brennan did a statistically significant number of test iterations and produced a set of hard numbers which proved his theory. But the ICC are afraid of facts because players and fans don't deal in facts, they deal in sensation. Earlier in the article, "Nine reported that testing was carried out, which showed that a second layer of tape had the dulling effect." A second layer of tape. OK, players have been taping bats forever, but are they now adding a second layer of tape? Why? Have bats suddenly become more prone to wear? On the edges? Now, my opinion is that this isn't cheating - but it might be something we want to make illegal.

  • shot274 on August 8, 2013, 22:02 GMT

    If a bit of tape confounds a technology dont get rid of the tape, get rid of that technology!

  • Cpt.Meanster on August 8, 2013, 21:50 GMT

    It's a flawed system. End of story, let's move on.

  • r1m2 on August 8, 2013, 21:49 GMT

    I wonder what the reaction would've been had Pakistani players been the ones who stood accused ofnbat tampering. I wonder how much more stronger evidence ICC and ecb would've required.

    also even if we take these cricketers on their words, knowing full well that drs performance so far in this series has been bordering on suspicious, now after the inventor himself has admitted the weakness, aren't we opening up the players to even more such suspicious explorations? if Aussies weren't doing it they'd suspect the poms of doing it. and vice versa.

    ICC needs to ban the use of drs for international matches at once to save the integrity of the game.

  • on August 8, 2013, 20:09 GMT

    It is obvious to any engineer familiar with thermal imaging technology which relies on temperature rise detection, that using a thermally insulating compound such as fibre or silicone will render it ineffective Modern day tapes which are used for bats will be fibre or equivalent There is no doubt that fibre and such are more durable and reliable when protecting edges. Gone are the days when organic material was used Accusing the players of using it deliberately to avoid Hot Spot is silly This effectively nullifies what Hot Spot is trying to achieve The ICC should either drop the technology or ban the use of such material for protecting bat edges The latter is far more difficult to implement So ICC has to drop Hot Spot and evaluate some other technology rather than bandy about on this subject

  • SL_BiggestJoke on August 8, 2013, 20:00 GMT

    Here we go again... what a complete and utter mess! We have the inventors of the technology blaming players, the players blaming umpires and technology, the umpires blaming technology, the boards blaming each other.. the fans blaming each other (that is fine!).. DRS has created an expensive and time wasting circus!

  • arvind.panchal on August 8, 2013, 19:50 GMT

    Just how many minutes will it take to test this. Take a bat do few trials with tape of different kind and then compare it among different types of tape and without tape. If you are running a company based on this technology, this is one of things, must have already been done. If not its not too late to make these tests. Hotspot is a useful things to have in matches but proper controls must exist.

  • EnglishCricket on August 8, 2013, 19:11 GMT

    People are forgetting that the main purpose of UDRS is to remove HOWLERS!!! with these 50:50 situations I'd say TOUGH LUCK!!!! you win some you lose some just get on with it.

  • EnglishCricket on August 8, 2013, 19:11 GMT

    People are forgetting that the main purpose of UDRS is to remove HOWLERS!!! with these 50:50 situations I'd say TOUGH LUCK!!!! you win some you lose some just get on with it.

  • arvind.panchal on August 8, 2013, 19:50 GMT

    Just how many minutes will it take to test this. Take a bat do few trials with tape of different kind and then compare it among different types of tape and without tape. If you are running a company based on this technology, this is one of things, must have already been done. If not its not too late to make these tests. Hotspot is a useful things to have in matches but proper controls must exist.

  • SL_BiggestJoke on August 8, 2013, 20:00 GMT

    Here we go again... what a complete and utter mess! We have the inventors of the technology blaming players, the players blaming umpires and technology, the umpires blaming technology, the boards blaming each other.. the fans blaming each other (that is fine!).. DRS has created an expensive and time wasting circus!

  • on August 8, 2013, 20:09 GMT

    It is obvious to any engineer familiar with thermal imaging technology which relies on temperature rise detection, that using a thermally insulating compound such as fibre or silicone will render it ineffective Modern day tapes which are used for bats will be fibre or equivalent There is no doubt that fibre and such are more durable and reliable when protecting edges. Gone are the days when organic material was used Accusing the players of using it deliberately to avoid Hot Spot is silly This effectively nullifies what Hot Spot is trying to achieve The ICC should either drop the technology or ban the use of such material for protecting bat edges The latter is far more difficult to implement So ICC has to drop Hot Spot and evaluate some other technology rather than bandy about on this subject

  • r1m2 on August 8, 2013, 21:49 GMT

    I wonder what the reaction would've been had Pakistani players been the ones who stood accused ofnbat tampering. I wonder how much more stronger evidence ICC and ecb would've required.

    also even if we take these cricketers on their words, knowing full well that drs performance so far in this series has been bordering on suspicious, now after the inventor himself has admitted the weakness, aren't we opening up the players to even more such suspicious explorations? if Aussies weren't doing it they'd suspect the poms of doing it. and vice versa.

    ICC needs to ban the use of drs for international matches at once to save the integrity of the game.

  • Cpt.Meanster on August 8, 2013, 21:50 GMT

    It's a flawed system. End of story, let's move on.

  • shot274 on August 8, 2013, 22:02 GMT

    If a bit of tape confounds a technology dont get rid of the tape, get rid of that technology!

  • __PK on August 8, 2013, 22:04 GMT

    Noone ever listens to the experts. arvind.pancha,l read the last paragraph again. They've done the tests already. But the ICC are using wishy-washy language to hide it "He did some tests that he felt supported that theory." Rubbish. I bet Brennan did a statistically significant number of test iterations and produced a set of hard numbers which proved his theory. But the ICC are afraid of facts because players and fans don't deal in facts, they deal in sensation. Earlier in the article, "Nine reported that testing was carried out, which showed that a second layer of tape had the dulling effect." A second layer of tape. OK, players have been taping bats forever, but are they now adding a second layer of tape? Why? Have bats suddenly become more prone to wear? On the edges? Now, my opinion is that this isn't cheating - but it might be something we want to make illegal.

  • KingOwl on August 8, 2013, 22:19 GMT

    I would like to know whether these types of tape have started appearing recently and if so why. Someone needs to ask the players the reasons. May be there is a good reason. If there isn't, then of course there will be suspicions.

  • TengaZool on August 8, 2013, 22:59 GMT

    DRS - The System is an absolute joke. Technology may have its limitations - that's ok, but the way the system has been implemented is beyond belief. It has been said time and again that the technology had not been tested as much as it should have been before implementation. FIFA had commissioned EMPA to conduct extensive tests before implementing Goal Line Technology. During ITF testing in 2006 Hawk-Eye passed a number of stringent parameters before being implemented into the TENNIS world. What tests have ICC conducted? Have they consolidated their findings and trained their umpires enough to use technology correctly? Have they defined the process on how to use the technological information? Didn't we have this same discussion when India toured England and Michael Vaughan accused Laxman of using Vaseline and the inventor said the only thing that would make a difference is the use of tapes? And here we are again having the same discussion without anything being fixed. ICC IS A JOKE.