Fifth Test Match


For the third time in the series they gained victory with an innings to spare. Bradman's luck with the coin continued, Australia batting first for the fourth occasion out of five, and once more the India bowling received scant respect.

Following the dismissal of Barnes, brilliantly run out by Adhikari at 48, Brown and Bradman were never in trouble until the Australian captain unfortunately tore a rib muscle and retired. Miller did not stay long and Brown was run out when one short of a hundred, but the remaining Australian batsmen all scored readily. Chief honours fell to Neil Harvey, a nineteen-year-old left-hander, playing in his second Test Match. He hit the first hundred of his career, showing the confidence of an experienced cricketer. He scored 153 in just over four hours and his only mistake occurred shortly before his dismissal. He hit a 5 and eleven 4's. Loxton, driving powerfully, helped Harvey in a stand of 159, and with useful contributions coming from Lindwall, Tallon, L. Johnson and W. Johnston, Bradman declared at tea-time on the second day.

Although India again lost the first wicket cheaply, they recovered well. Mankad and Adhikari took part in a second-wicket partnership of 124, and another good stand came from Mankad and Hazare. Mankad batted five hours for 111.

Of the remaining batsmen, only Phadkar offered much resistance, and India followed-on 244 behind. This time there was nobody to rescue them following the fall of the first wicket without a run scored, and a steady procession took place. The pitch could scarcely be blamed for the disaster, for it played fairly well. The last five wickets actually fell for 16 runs -- a sorry end to the Test series for India, who could, with reason, complain of ill-fortune in most of the matches.

© John Wisden & Co