Second Test

AUSTRALIA v NEW ZEALAND 1993-94

At Hobart, November 26, 27, 28, 29. Australia won by an innings and 222 runs Toss: Australia. Test debut: R. P. De Groen.

Having waited patiently for four years for the chance to host a second Test. Hobbs witnessed a Test match so one-sided that even New Zealand captain Rutherford judged it scarcely worthy of the status. Spinners Warne and May combined for 16 wickets to deliver New Zealand's heaviest Test defeat and Australia's fourth most emphatic win. It was all over in less than 20 hours.

New Zealand went in just before 4 p.m. on the second day and in less than ten playing hours were all out twice - each time for 161, and still 23 runs shy of the original follow-on target. Both innings had the same pattern. McDermott began by dismissing Greatbatch, Mark Waugh took a high-order wicket and Warne and May rolled up the rest like an old carpet. May, mostly through his heavily disguised arm-ball, took five wickets in an innings for the third time in Tests, all in 1993. Warne reciprocated with six for 31, giving him 63 Test wickets in a calendar year - already more than any spinner in history. Of the batsmen, Jones made a fight of the first innings, but by the second was mentally exhausted and hooked a bouncer directly to square leg. Rutherford boldly took the fight to Warne and was rewarded with a fluent second-innings 55 until he was bowled behind his legs trying to sweep. New Zealand's most combative player was Blain, who kept a straight bat and a cool head. On the way to 40 in the first innings he smacked May for four boundaries in a single over, as if to signal to the cowering dressing-room that the devils were as much in their own minds as in the pitch or the attack. But the gesture was lost on a team already mentally defeated.

Man of the Match: M. E. Waugh.

Attendance: 13,220

Close of play: First day, Australia 329-2 (D. C. Boon 105*, M. E. Waugh 18*); Second day, New Zealand 81-2 (A. H. Jones 34*, K. R. Rutherford 15*); Third day, New Zealand 127-5 (C. Z. Harris 4*, T. E. Blain 9*).

© John Wisden & Co