Second Test Match

Australia v India 1947-48

Toss: India. Test debuts: India - Amir Elahi, D.G.Phadkar.

The weather again proved unkind, less than ten hours' cricket being possible during six days. This meant there was little possibility of a definite result, although the Australians showed that they were equally as vulnerable as their opponents on a difficult pitch. Australia were without Toshack through injury, and India brought in Phadkar and Amir Elahi for Rangnekar and Sohoni. Phadkar fully justified his inclusion, showing capital all-round form. India made a poor start, losing Mankad and Sarwate for 16, and with 22 more added rain put an end to play. Two further wickets fell quickly when the game re-started an hour late next day, and six men were out for 95 before real resistance came. Then Kishenchand and Phadkar retreived matters with a stand of 70, but India could not feel happy with their total on a pitch which never really became treacherous.

Australia lost their first wicket in an unusual manner. In a previoius match Mankad, the bowler, warned Brown about backing up too far, and when the batsmen repeated this, ran him out. This time Mankad gave no warning, and the first occasion Brown moved down the pitch too quickly the bowler whipped off the bails. The third and fourth days were blank through rain and, as could be expeted, the saturated turf did not favour batsmen when the game re-started. Morris, Bradman and Hassett all fell cheaply, and despite brief resistance from Miller and Hamence, who added 38 for the fifth wicket, the end came quickly, the last five batsmen being dismissed for 21 runs. Phadkar and Hazare made the most of the conditions and were almost unplayable.

Johnston (fast-medium left-arm) and Johnson (off-breaks) were just as effective when India batted again 81 ahead. Before play ende on the fifth day, seven wickets fell for 61 runs. This gave India a lead of 142 with three men to be dismissed, but all chances of a thilling finish were dispelled when not a ball could be bowled on the last day.

© John Wisden & Co