1916

Obituaries in 1915

THE 1ST MARQUESS AND 5TH EARL OF ABERGAVENNY (SIR WILLIAM NEVILL, K. G.), born on September 16, 1826, died at Eridge Castle, Tunbridge Wells, on December 12, in his 90th year. He was President of the Kent County C.C. in 1878. In 1876 he was created Marquis of Abergavenny and Earl of Lewes.

2ND LIEUT. BERNARD RUSSELL ABINGER (2nd Batt. Royal Berkshire Regiment), who was killed in France on September 26, aged 21, played much cricket in South America. He had been awarded the Military Cross nine days before his death.

LIEUT. CYRIL AINSCOUGH (5th Manchester Regiment) was killed in action in the Dardanelles in August at the age of 22, having previously been wounded twice. He was in the Ampleforth College XI, and played later with success for the Ormskirk C.C.

MR. HENRY MORTLOCK AITKEN, who was born at Hadley, Middlesex, on January 8, 1831, died at Eastbourne on August 12, in his 85th year. At Eton he was in the Eleven four years, 1846 to 1849, being captain the last two seasons. He was a rather fast round-armed bowler with a pretty delivery, and afterwards became a good batsman. How high an opinion was formed of his play is obvious from the fact that in 1846, when only 15 years of age, he was offered a place in the Surrey Eleven. That season he obtained twelve wickets in the match with Harrow, and eight against Winchester: altogether, during his four years in the Eton side he took 41 wickets in the Public-School games, 32 of them v. Harrow. In 1853 he was a member of the Oxford team which beat Cambridge by an innings and 18 runs, but his share in the success was not very pronounced as he took only three wickets and contributed but 18 towards a total of 297. The same season he assisted the Gentlemen at Lord's, scoring 0 and 3, in the match made famous by Sir Frederick Bathurst and Mr. Kempson, who bowled unchanged throughout and caused the Players to be beaten by 60 runs. Of the twenty-two who took part in that game only Caffyn, in his 88th year, survives. In 1854 Mr. Aitken went to India, where for several years he was captain of the Calcutta team. On returning to England in 1871 he joined the M.C.C., and to the end of his life took the greatest interest in the game.

PRIVATE ERNEST DOUGLAS ALLEN (Scots Guards), was shot through the head during a night attack at Cuinchy on January the 1st. He was born on the 11th of August, 1884. He was holder of the London Press Golfing Society's Challenge Cup, and was for several years on the staff of the Cricket Reporting Agency. He enlisted during the first days of the War.

THE 1ST VISCOUNT ALVERSTONE (RICHARD EVERARD WEBSTER) who was born on December 22, 1842, died at Winterfold, Cranleigh, Surrey, on December 15. He was educated at King's College, London, and Charterhouse, and was in the latter XI in 1861, when it was said of him: Is a good long-field, and with practice will become a fair bat. He never made a name for himself as a cricketer, but played at least once for the Gentlemen of Devonshire. In 1878 he became a member of the M.C.C. was the Club's President in 1903, served on the Committee 1904-07 and 1909-11, and in July, 1909, succeeded Mr. William Nicholson as one of the Trustees. Since May, 1895, he had been President of the Surrey County C.C., and in 1902, in conjunction with Mr. C. W. Alcock, edited Surrey Cricket: Its History and Associations. At Cambridge he was a notable athlete, and in 1865 won the mile and two-mile races against Oxford. He was Attorney-General 1885-92 and 1895-1900, and Lord Chief Justice from 1900 to 1913, when he retired through ill-health. With his death the title becomes extinct.

PRIVATE DAVID ANDERSON, killed in the Dardanelles in May, aged 21, was a great all-round athlete, and a former member of Stewart's College XI. At the time of his death he was serving in the 5th Royal Scots (Queen's, Edinburgh).

CAPT. ROBERT CUNNINGHAM ANDERSON (1st Black Watch), born in November, 1890, died on September 29 of wounds received in France four days earlier. He did not obtain a place in the Eleven whilst at Rugby, but played for his Battalion. He was mentioned in Despatches.

LIEUT. WILLIAM LYON ANDERTON was shot on the Western front on August 21, aged 30, whilst serving in the 4th (Territorial) Batt. West Riding Regt. (Duke of Wellington's). He was educated at Merchant Taylors School, where he was in the Eleven in 1901 and 1902 and obtained his colours for football. Later he played for the Cleckheaton C.C.

2ND LIEUT. REGINALD BRANT ARNELL (7th King's Royal Rifles), who had been captain of cricket and football at Berkhamsted School, was killed in action in Flanders on July 30, aged 21. In 1912 he had a batting average of 31.61.

CAPT. FREDERICK MARRINER ASTON (6th Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry) was killed in Flanders on July 31, aged 48. Educated at Shrewsbury, he was in the School Eleven in 1885 and 1886, in the latter year scoring 152 runs with an average of 16.88 and taking sixteen wickets for 16.43 runs each. It was then said of him: Hits very hard, with a crooked bat, and has been a very useful scorer: has bowled with sucess at times, but is uncertain; a brilliant and generally safe field. He was not in the Eleven at Cambridge, but obtained his blue for Association football, playing against Oxford in the drawn game at Queen's Club in February, 1889.

LIEUT. R. MARRINER ASTON (6th Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry), son of the above-mentioned, was killed in France in the middle of March. He was in the Rugby Eleven in 1911 and 1912, being a fair batsman and good bowler and fieldsman: in the latter year he headed the bowling averages with a record of twenty wickets for 15.60 runs each. In his two matches against Marlborough he made 47 runs in two completed innings and obtained ten wickets for 184 runs.

2ND LIEUT. J. O. ATCHISON (5th Yorkshire Light Infantry), killed in Flanders on July 14, aged 30, was born in Australia and educated at the Oratory, Birmingham, where he was captain of the school and of the cricket and football elevens. He kept up the game subsequently in Australia and Upper Burma.

THE REV. JOHN THOMAS ATHAWES, born on December 8, 1837, died at Crown Holl, Tenbury, on October the 3rd, having been Rector of Loughton, Bucks, since 1883. He was not in the Eleven whilst at Winchester, but played for Cambridge on a few occasions in 1859 and 1860, but not against Oxford. In the match against Surrey at the Oval in 1859 he made 42 in his first innings. It was said of him: Has a very excellent defence but does not improve in hitting.

MR. FRANCIS HUGH BACON (Assistant-Paymaster R.N.R.) born at Colombo on June 24, 1869, was drowned off the coast of Belgium on October 31 through the patrol ship on which he was serving being mined. He was educated at St. Augustine's College, Canterbury, where he was in the Eleven, and afterwards settled in Basingstoke. Early in 1894, on the strength of three not-out innings of 101 for Basingstoke, he was tried for Hampshire, and in his first match for the County--against Warwickshire at Edgbaston--scored 114 without a chance in 130 minutes. He never quite realized promise, although he made several good scores subsequently, especially one of 110 v. Leicestershire in 1907. Considering his small statue (5ft. 5in.) he was a free hitter, and for some years was one of the best cover-points-in England. He was one of the comparatively few cricketers who played first as a professional and afterwards as an amateur. From 1903 until his death he was Secretary of the Hampshire County C.C., giving every satisfaction whilst in that position and making many friends by his geniality.

CAPT. DAVID MCLAREN BAIN (3rd Gordon Highlanders) was killed in Flanders on June the 3rd in his twenty-fifth year. In 1909 and 1910 he was in the Edinburgh Academy Eleven, being played chiefly for his bowling. He was also a very well-known Rugby footballer, captaining the Oxford XV, and being a Scottish International forward.

CAPT. ARTHUR WILLIAM BALDERS (Norfolk Regiment, attached to Nigeria Regt), who was killed in the Cameroons in November, played cricket for his Regiment and Aldershot Command. He was born in 1887, and educated at Cheltenham, but was not in the Eleven.

LIEUT. ISAAC BAYLEY BALFOUR (14th Battalion the Royal Scots, attached 1st Battalion K.O.S.B.), born on October 19, 1889, was killed in action at the Dardanelles on June 28. He was in the Winchester Eleven of 1908, scoring 75 runs with an average of 12.50 and taking seventeen wickets for 26.47 runs apiece. Against Eton he made 0 and 32, and in an innings of 410 for seven wickets obtained two wickets for 130 runs. He did not obtain his blue at Oxford.

MR. ROBERT DRUMMOND BALFOUR, who was born at Putney on March 1, 1844, died at Welwyn on May 7. After playing in the Westminster XI, he obtained his blue at Cambridge, appearing four times ( 1863-66) against Oxford at Lord's. Scores and Biographies said of him: Is a safe and steady batsman, possessing an excellent style, and has distinguished himself in various matches. He was also a very good wicket-keeper, and in the University's match with Surrey at the Oval in 1866 caught three and stumped two in an innings. In his eight innings against Oxford he scored 101 runs, and was always on the losing side. In 1866, his last season in the Eleven, he appeared for the Gentlemen at Lord's, making 23 and 4, and bringing off two catches in the second innings of the Players, who (owing chiefly to a very lucky innings of 122 not out by the late Tom Hearne) won by 38 runs. In important cricket his highest score was 82 for the M.C.C. against the University at Lord's in 1867, but a year earlier he had made 67 on the same ground off the bowling of Wooton and Grundy, and in 1863 had played an innings of 60 against Buttress and Tarrant at Cambridge. Mr. Balfour, who played for I. Zingari and had been a member of the M.C.C. since 1868, was a younger brother of Mr. E. Balfour of the Oxford Eleven of 1852 and two following years. He was one of the men who helped to bring about the rule which prevented a cricketer from representing his University more than four times in the great match at Lord's.

LIEUT. JAMES ELLIOT BALFOUR-MELVILLE (3rd Black Watch), a son of Mr. Leslie M. Balfour-Melville, was born in Edinburgh on July 9, 1882, and was killed in action in France on September 27. He was a useful hard-hitting batsman and a good wicket-keeper, and for the Malvern College XI in 1901 averaged 23.91: that year he played an innings of 51 v. Uppingham. In 1913 he was a member of the Scotch side which played a few matches in England, and against Surrey at the Oval scored 32 out of 43 in twenty minutes. Among the many clubs to which he belonged were the M.C.C., I. Zingari and Grange. For the last-named he averaged 57 in 1905. At Oxford he obtained his blue for Association football, playing from 1901 to 1905, and in the last-mentioned year being captain.

MR. WILLIAM BALSTER, who was born at Woolwich, in Kent, and died at Chicago in May, aged 50, was an excellent fieldsman and a good hard-hitting batsman with many strokes. For 25 years he was identified prominently with the game in Chicago, making many large scores for the Wanderers: his highest innings was 176 for Wanderers B. v. Douglas Park B in 1905. For many years he was Secretary of the club mentioned.

2ND LIEUT. CECIL BANES-WALKER (2nd Battalion Devon Regiment) was killed near Ypres on May 9, aged 26. He was born at North Pethertons, near Bridgwater, and came to the front as a member of the Long Ashton C.C. In 1914 he appeared in five matches for Somerset, and by aggressive batting made 172 runs with an average of 19.11, his highest score being 40 v. Hampshire at Southampton. He was also a very good hockey player, assisting Gloucestershire under the residential qualification.

CAPT. PERCY D'AGUILAR BANKS--Queen Victoria's Own Corps of Guides (attached 57th Rifles)--was killed near Ypres on April 28. He was born in 1885 and was in the Cheltenham Eleven in 1902, when he made 312 runs an average of 22.28, making 27 and 103 v. Haileybury, 8 and 6 v. Marlborough, and 62 and 6 v. Clifton. In 1903 he was third in the Sandhurst averages with 33.00, and the same season played once for Somerset, scoring 0 and 27 v. Hampshire at Bournemouth. Later he did well in India, and in 1904 appeared for the Army against the Rest at Lahore. He was also well-known as a polo player. Writing of his batting in Wisden of 1903, the late Mr. W. J. Ford said:-- Banks played a remarkable innings of 103 v. Haileybury. The pavilion critics were unanimous in calling it equal to any innings ever played by a boy at Lord's, his variety of strokes and his manipulation of the bat being quite Trumperesque. I fancied that he must be exceedingly strong in wrist and elbow.

2ND LIEUT. JAMES JOYCE BEASLEY (6th Royal Irish Fusiliers), who was killed in the Dardanelles in August, aged 19, was educated at Trinity College, Dublin, where he won much distinction as a cricketer, footballer and oarsman.

CAPT. GORDON BELCHER, 3rd (attached to 1st) Battalion Royal Berkshire Regiment, youngest son of the Rev. T. Hayes Belcher, of the Oxford XI of 1870, was killed in action in France on May 16, aged 29. He was educated at Brighton College, where he was in the Eleven in 1901 and three following years, leading the side in 1903 and 1904. His record there was a good one:--

1901110 runs (average 8.46) and 17 wickets (average 17.05)
1902276 runs (average 17.25) and 36 wickets (average 16.63)
1903216 runs (average 27.00) and 15 wickets (average 28.20)
1904402 runs (average 28.71) and 50 wickets (average 12.14)

During his last season he made most runs, took most wickets, and headed both batting and bowling averages. In 1905 he played in the Freshmen's match at Cambridge, but did not obtain his blue. Later he appeared frequently for Berkshire, his most successful years being 1910 and 1911, when his averages were 27.00 and 26.60 respectively. He was first in the County's bowling in 1912 and second in 1911. His highest innings for Berkshire were 112 not out v. Wiltshire at Reading in 1910, and 104 not out v. Carmarthen on the same ground a year later. In 1905 he played in one match for Hampshire--against Warwickshire at Southampton, in which he was unfortunate enough to obtain spectacles. He was born at Brighton College on September 26th, 1885. In February last he was awarded the Military Cross.

LANCE-CORPL. JOSEPH BELL (Machine-Gun Section Queen's Own Rifles) was born in Bombay on February 13, 1888, and killed in action in April. In 1905 he settled in Toronto, where he became prominently identified with the Rosedale C.C. As a batsman he was well above average, his best feats being to score 84 and 77 not out for Ontario Cricket Association v. Eastern Canada in 1909, and 67 not out and 70 for Ontario v. Quebec in the following year. In 1909, when playing for Ontario against the Gentlmen of Ireland at Toronto, he made 3 and 41.

CAPT. FRANK MILLER BINGHAM (5th King's Own Royal Lancaster Regiment) was born September 17, 1874, and killed in Flanders on May 22. He was in the Eleven at St. Peter's School, York, and in 1896 played for Derbyshire v. M.C.C. and Ground at Lord's scoring 6 and 11. Up to the outbreak of war he was in medical practice at Lancaster. He was at one time a well-known Blackheath Rugby forward.

LIEUT-COL. ARTHUR PERCIVAL DEARMAN BIRCHALL, Colonel of the 4th Battalion (Infantry), was born in 1877 and killed near Ypres on April 23. He was not in the Eleven at Eton or Oxford, but was a useful cricketer and played much in regimental matches.

LIEUT. WILFRID STANLEY BIRD (6th Battalion King's Royal Rifle Corps.) was born at Yiewsley, Middlesex, September 28, 1883, and killed in action on April 9. He was educated at the Grange, Eastbourne, where he was captain of the cricket and football elevens, and afterwards at Malvern, where he represented the College at cricket, football and fives. He was in the Malvern eleven in 1900-1-2, among his contemporaries being A.P. Day and G. N. Foster. Going up to Oxford with good credentials as a wicket-keeper he would in the ordinary course of events have stepped straight into the eleven, but Oxford in 1903 had a wicket-keeper of established reputation in W. Findlay. However, he kept wicket for Oxford in 1904-5-6, being captain of the eleven his last year. As a wicket-keeper he had not the genius of Martyn or Macgregor, but he was decidedly above the average. It was his privilege to keep wicket for the Gentlemen at Lord's in 1908 and 1912. He also played on a few occasions for Middlesex. His skill was, perhaps, never seen to better advantage than when keeping to D. W. Carr's googlies at Scarborough in 1909. As a batsman he was only moderate, but he helped the late W. H. B. Evans to save the University match in 1904. He was a master at Ludgrove School for several years, and was gazetted to the King's Royal Rifles in January, 1915. He had been a member of the M.C.C. since 1905.

THE REV. HENRY BRYDGES BIRON, who was born at Hythe on June 13th, 1835, died at Derringstone, Barham, Canterbury, on April 7, in his 80th year. He was a free and attractive batsman who made several good scores for the Gentlemen of Kent. In August, 1864, he made 214 for Cambridge Quidnuncs against the Gentlemen of Sussex, at Brighton, this being the first instance of an innings of 200 or more being played in that county. His enormous score was achieved by the most rapid hitting and judicious placing, combined with a just contempt of the wicket-keeper. The bat used on that occasion was borrowed from Mr. John Walker, the eldest of the famous brotherhood. Mr. Biron evidently had a partiality for the old Brighton ground, for he scored 59 and 68 there for the Gentlemen of Kent against the Gentlemen of Sussex in 1862, and 67 and 52 not out in the match between the same sides in the following year. Between 1857 and 1864 he represented the County in fifteen matches, scoring 208 runs with an average of 9.90, and taking one wicket for 31 runs. He was educated at King's School, Canterbury, and at Cambridge, but did not obtain a place in the University eleven.

MAJOR JOHN G. BLACKBURNE (9th Sherwood Foresters) was killed in the Dardanelles on August 22, aged 42. He was in the Charterhouse Eleven in 1890 and had been a member of the M.C.C. since 1910. He played in many Army matches in Ireland and also appeared for the Free Foresters.

CAPT. HARVERY BLEASE-- King's (Liverpool Regiment) 15th Battalion--was killed in august, at the age of 32, whilst serving in the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force. He was educated at Sedbergh, where he was in the Eleven, and later was for many years captain of the Sefton Park C.C., Liverpool. In 1907, 1908, 1912, and 1913 he headed the latter's averages, his figures in the last mentioned year being 52.72 with 167 not out as highest score. He was also a distinguished cross-country runner.

CORPL. CHARLES HUBERT BLIGH (8th Overseas Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force) was a well-known Winnipeg cricketer identified with the Free Press C.C. He was born at Mirzapur, India, on October 5, 1891, and fell in action in France on May 8.

LIEUT. EDWARD HENRY SWINBURNE BLIGH (Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve) was killed in action in the Dardanelles on September 10, aged 31. He played cricket both at Clifton and Cambridge, but was not in either Eleven. A son of the late Rev. the Hon. Henry Bligh, he was a member of the well-known Kent cricketing family. The present Earl of Darnley was his cousin, and the late Hon. the Rev. E. V. Bligh his uncle.

MR. JOHN BLYTH, Who died on November 18, aged 81, was President of the Sefton C.C.

CAPT. CHARLES GORDON BOND (2nd Wiltshire Regiment), who was killed in action in Flanders on November 25, aged 34, was a very useful cricketer who played for his Regiment, Tidworth Garrison and Free Foresters. He had been a member of the M.C.C. since 1905.

MR. RONALD MERVYN HAROLD BONHAM-CARTER died on March 11, aged 21, and is buried at Westerham. He was in the Winchester Eleven of 1910, when he scored 225 runs with an average of 14.06, and took fourteen wickets for 15.50 runs each. Against Eton he made 11 and 3 and took six wickets for 71.

CAPT. WINFIELD JOYCE BONSER (Rifle Brigade) fell in action in France on September 25, aged 29. In 1904 he was in the Westminster Eleven, scoring 285 runs with an average of 17.81

2ND LIEUT. ARTHUR GEORGE EVELYN BOURCHIER (2nd Royal Berkshire Regiment) fell in action near Ypres on May 9, aged 24, having previously been wounded--on April 12--while superintending a bomb-throwing experiment. He was educated at St. Edmund's College, Old Hall, Ware, Herts., and was a very useful club cricketer. During one week's play in Devonshire in 1914 he scored 61, 42, 113 not out, 135 not out, 105 and 97.

CAPT. THE HON. FERGUS BOWES-LYON (8th Black Watch), fourth son of the 14th Early of Strathmore, was killed in France on September 27, aged 26. He was a keen cricketer and took part in the autumn fixtures at Glamis Castle.

PRIVATE WILLIAM JAMES BOWSER (7th Overseas Battalion Canadian Expeditionary Force) was born at Victoria, British Columbia, on September 9, 1891, and killed near Ypres on April 15. He was a useful batsman and played for Victoria University (B.C.) and Point Grey C.C.

LIEUT. DRUCE ROBERT BRANDT (6th--attached 1st--Rifle Brigade) was killed in Flanders on July 6. As he was born at Streatham on October 20, 1887, he was in his 28th year. A very good batman and wicket-keeper, he was in the Harrow Eleven three years, commencing 1904, and in 1907 obtained his blue for Oxford as a Freshman. In his six innings against Eton he made 132 runs, his highest score being 53 in 1904. On his only appearance in the University match he made 3 not out and 4. In 1909 he made 44 and 70 not out in the Seniors' match. He had been a member of the M.C.C. since 1907. It should be added that whilst at Harrow he won the Public Schools light-weight boxing championship.

MR. G. W. BREED, Who died at York on April 27 at the early age of 31, was a cricketer of more than average ability, and had played in turn for the York C.C., Yorkshire 2nd XI, and Durham County. His brother, Ernest Breed, was the Amateur billiards champion in 1906.

MR. H. C. BRETTALL, Town Clerk and Clerk of the Peace at Dudley, died in April, aged 67. He was prominently associated with the Dudley C.C., and in his young days played for XVIII's and XXII's of Dudley against England XI's. It was on his initiative that the Birmingham and District Cricket Association was formed in 1879.

2ND LIEUT. JOHN KENNETH BRICE-SMITH (7th Battalion Lincolnshire Regiment) was killed in Flanders on September 11, at the age of 20. He was useful both as batsman and change bowler, and at Cranleigh School, Surrey, was captain of the cricket and football teams and a member of the shooting eight. He was well-known in Lincolnshire club cricket.

MR. EVERARD BRITTEN-HOLMES, who died at Kensington on August 25 in his 64th year, was founder of the Oxford University Authentics and had been honorary secretary and treasurer of the Club since 1883. He had been a member of the M.C.C. since 1892.

MAJOR BERNARD MAYNARD LUCAS BRODHURST (4th Gurkha Rifles) was killed near Y pres on April 27, aged 41. As a fast bowler with good length and pace he obtained a place in the Clifton XI in 1889 and two following years, his best season being that of 1890, when he took 30 wickets at a cost of 14.66 runs each. In 1891, when he had a batting average of 15.30, it was said of him:-- Would be a most destructive bowler if he could only bowl with the same confidence and luck with which he bats: he has improved in fielding. In 1892 he was in the Sandhurst Eleven, and in the match with Woolwich scored 0 not out and 6, and obtained three wickets. He had been a member of the M.C.C. since 1905.

SUB-LIEUT. RUPERT C. BROOKE (Royal Naval Division), born at Rugby on August 3, 1887, died at Lemnos of sunstroke on April 23. In 1906 he was in the Rugby Eleven, and although he was unsuccessful in the Marlborough match he headed the School's bowling averages with a record of nineteen wickets for 14.05 runs each. He had gained considerable reputation as a poet.

CAPT. F. S. BROWN (5th Manchester Regt.), who fell in action in May, distinguished himself as a member of the Wigan C.C., being a sound bat and a useful bowler.

JOSEPH H. BROWN, who died in May at the age of 39, was a well-known professional who excelled as a right-handed bowler with considerable break. He was engaged in succession by Birken-head Park, Sefton, and Colne, and, later, in the Staffordshire League. Undoubtedly his best season was that of 1910, in which he obtained eighty-two wickets for Colne for nine runs apiece. He appeared with success in some of the first-class matches played by Liverpool and District.

THE REV. ELLIOTT KENWORTHY BROWNE, for 26 years Rector of North Stoneham, Southampton, was born at Goldington Hall, near Bedford, on October 10, 1847, and died at Bournemouth on March 10. He was in the Rugby Eleven in 1866, when he was described as a fair bat, with good style and hitting; an admirable field at mid-off and long-leg where he has made some wonderful catches. Against Marlborough he scored only 2 and 8, and at Oxford he did not obtain his blue. In 1868 he appeared in the Hampshire XI, and in 1872 for Gloucestershire, for which county he made 52 v. Sussex, at Clifton.

CAPT. HAROLD VERNON BROWNE (1st Queen's Own Dorset Yeomanry) was born at Buckland Park, South Australia, and died on September 7 of wounds received at the Dardanelles. In 1901 and 1902 he was in the Wellington Eleven, with out, however, performing anything of note.

MR. HENRY AUGUSTINE BRUMO, who lost his life when the Lusitania was torpedoed on May 7, was honorary secretary of the Commonwealth C.C. of Montclair (New Jersey) in 1912. He was born in London, and was 43 years of age.

THE REV. MARTIN BRERETON BUCKLE, Hon. Canon of Worcester and Rector of Astley, who died suddenly at Malvern of February 10, at the age of 62, had been a very useful all-round cricketer. At Bromsgrove Grammar School he was in the Eleven in 1869 and 1870, being contemporary with E. M. Kenney, and captain in his last year. He was described as An excellent bowler, being very straight and having a good pitch; a good bat, but wants a little more confidence and should practise leg-hitting. A brilliant point. In the days before Worcestershire became a first-class county he for a while captained the county team. In 1886, when he made 110 v. Old Malvernians, he was second in the batting averages with 52.25; and in 1887 and 1888 occupied the same position with 35.61 and 27.20 respectively, in 1887 scoring 134 v. Bromsgrove School and 116 v. Warwickshire Regiment. In 1888 also he headed the County's bowling.

SIR THOMAS TOWNSEND BUCKNILL, The well-known Judge, was born on April 18, 1845, and died at Epson on October 4, aged 70. He did not obtain his colours whilst at Westminster, but was a life-long enthusiast and a generous supporter of the game. For many years he had been a member of the Surrey County C.C.

MR. THOMAS LOWNDES BULLOCK, born September 27, 1845, died at Oxford on March 20. He was in the Winchester Eleven in 1864, and was described as a first-rate field at long-leg; fair bat. In the match with Eton he scored 0 and 14. At Oxford he was in the New College XI, but did not obtain his blue. He was Professor of Chinese in the University of Oxford, and formerly H. M.'s Consul in China.

CAPT. L. VINCENT BURGOYNE-JOHNSON (8th Durham Light Infantry), killed in action on April 28, was a well-known Durham County club cricketer. He was brother of Mr. F. W. Burgoyne-Johnson whose name will be found occasionally in the Count Eleven.

LIEUT. LEONARD RIGHTON BURROWS (9th Northumberland Fusiliers) was born on October 10, 1888, and was killed in Flanders on September 27. In 1905 and two following seasons he was in the Charterhouse Eleven, being a hard-hitting batsman and a moderate disciple of the Schwarz school. In 1905, when only sixteen, he headed the school averages with a record of nineteen wickets for 14.26 runs each, and two years later, when he was captain, was again the most successful bowler in he side, his twenty-eight wickets then costing 14.14 runs apiece. In 1906 he played an innings against Westminster destined to be long remembered, going in last man and carrying out his bat for 42, he and C. V. L. Hooman adding as many as 119 together. At Oxford in 1908 he took six wickets for 40 in the second innings of the Freshmen's Match, but did not receive his blue. He was a son of the Bishop of Sheffield.

CAPT. W. M. BURT-MARSHALL (Argyll and Sutherland High-landers), who died in February of wounds received in action, was in Rugby Eleven in 1905 when he scored 139 runs ten innings. He was also a well-known footballer, playing both for his School and Sandhurst.

2ND LIEUT. HAROLD STERNDALE ENTWISLE BURY (Grenadier Guards), born in 1889, was killed in the trenches on January 25. He was in the Eton XI in 1907, when he scored 207 runs with an average of 29.57. His highest innings of the season was 65 v. Harrow: he did not play against Winchester.

MR. SPENCER PERCIVAL BUTLER, born on April, 1828, died at Oxford on July 11, aged 87. He was elder brother of Dr. Montagu Butler, Master of Trinity (Cambridge), and was in the Rugby Eleven of 1847. His highest score was 46 v. The Town, but in the first innings of the match with M.C.C. and Ground he made 14 off the bowling of William Lillywhite and Dakin. He was Conveyancing Counsel to the High Court of Justice.

MR. FREDERIC WILLIAM BUTTERWORTH, who died at Putney on February 19, aged 70, was in the Marlborough Eleven in 1860 and three following years, being captain in 1863. Among his contemporaries were J. J. Sewell, S. C. Voules, E. L. Fellowes, and T. W. Baggallay. He was an able captain and was described as A good bat and free hitter all round, but was somewhat unlucky last season ( 1863); a beautiful field at cover-point and sometimes gets wickets with slows. In his two matches against Rugby--there was no game in 1861, and in 1860 he did not play owing to illness--he made only 19 runs in three innings. He was deputy chairman of the Gresham Assurance Offices.

2ND LIEUT. HUGH MONTAGU BUTTERWORTH (9th Rifle Brigade) was killed in Flanders on September 25, aged 29. He was educated at Marlborough, where he was in the Eleven in 1903 and 1904, being sixth in the averages in the former year with 13.36 and first in the latter with 34.13. In 1904 he played a first innings of 78 in the match with Rugby at Lord's. Proceeding to Oxford, he made many good scores for University College, but did not obtain his blue, although he was accorded a few trials in the Eleven in 1906 on the strength of an innings of 130 in the Seniors' Match, wherein he and C. J. Farmer scored 157 for the first wicket. In 1905 and 1906 he played Rackets (Doubles) for Oxford v. Cambridge, in the former year having the Hon. D. N. Bruce as a partner and in the latter G. N. Foster. Subsequently he settled in Wanganui, New Zealand, where he kept up the game, and in the early part of the 1914-15 season scored 296 and 311 in consecutive innings.

SIR THOMAS FOWELL BUXTON, 3rd Bart., G.C.M.G., was born at Cromer on January 26, 1837, and died there on October 28. He was not in the Eleven either at Harrow or Cambridge, but was very fond of the game, and was a well-known member of the Essex County C.C. From 1865 to 1868 he was M.P. for King's Lynn, and from 1895 to 1898 Governor of South Australia.

THE 5TH EARL CADOGAN, K.G. (GEORGE HENRY CADOGAN), who was born at Durham on May 12, 1840, died in London on March 6. He had been a member of the M.C.C. since 1863, and in 1873 was (as Vicount Chelsea) President of the Club. He was also proprietor of the estate in which Prince's Ground was situated. The 1st Duke of Wellington was his great uncle, and the 2nd Earl of Craven (President of the M.C.C. in 1841) his father-in-law. He was educated at Eton and Oxford, but was not in either Eleven.

LIEUT. GEORGE EDWARD FORMAN CAMPBELL (2nd Battalion 10th Gurkha Rifles), who was killed at the Dardanelles between August the 6th and 10th, aged 21, was in the Edinburgh Academy Eleven in 1909 and two following years. His most successful season was that of 1910, in which he scored 219 runs with an average of 19.91 and obtained twenty-two wickets at a cost of 23.45 runs each. Both at the Academy and Sandhurst he was in the XV.

SERGT. EVAN STUART CAMERON (14th Overseas Battalion Canadian Contingent), killed at St. Julien on April 24, aged 21, was captain of the Blundell's School XI in 1912, when he headed the averages with 40.92. That year he was chosen for the Public School's XI against the M.C.C. at Lord's and scored 20. He played for Montreal v. Australians in 1913, and the same year was a member of the Montreal team which visited New York and Philadelphia. In the match v. Staten Island he scored 140. He was born at Inverness on September 2, 1893.

CAPT. EDWARD BERRY CARPENTER (Plymouth Battalion R. M. Brigade R. N. Division) died of wounds at the Dardanelles on August 18, aged 29. He was in the Winchester Eleven in 1905, when he scored 93 runs with an average of 11.62 and took twenty-two wickets for 18.63 runs each. Against Eton he played an innings of 34 and, with right-hand slows, obtained eight wickets for 115. He did not obtain his blue at Oxford.

THE REV. WILLIAM ARNOLD CARR, who died at Brighton on April 23, was one of the founders of the Sussex Martlets C.C., and played for the Gentlemen of Sussex. He was Vicar of Christ Church, Brighton.

MAJOR WILLIAM OXENHAM CAUTLEY, D.S.O. (3rd Suffolk Regiment, attached tot he 1st Northants), was born in 1875 and killed on May 9 while leading his men against the German trenches. He was in the Bradfield Eleven in 1892, 1893, and 1894, and was described as A very fair fast-medium bowler of his day; a very unsafe, though at times a brilliant, field; has no idea of batting; handicapped much by ill-health. He received his D.S.O. for conspicuous gallantry on December 22nd, 1914, near La Quinque Rue.

2ND LIEUT. R. M. CHADWICK (R.G.A.) died of wounds on May 12. He was in the Rugby Eleven in 1902 and two following years, and in his three matches v. Marlborough, at Lord's made 94 runs in five innings, his highest score being 46 in 1904. At times he bowled well, though never more than as a change.

LIEUT.-COL. E. H. CHAPMAN (6th Battalion Yorkshire Regiment), who was killed in action in the Dardanelles on August 7, aged 40, was in the Eleven at Aysgarth and United Services College, Westward Ho! but not at Sandhurst. He was a keen follower of hounds.

2ND LIEUT. A. K. CHAYTOR (3rd Battalion Worcester Regiment) died of wounds in France on May 26, aged 24. He was educated at King's School, Worcester, where he was successively captain of cricket and of the boats.

ARTHUR CHESTER, born at Kingston-on-Thames on December 18, 1851, died in St.Thomas' Hospital on May 13, following an operation for cancer. Scores and Biographies said of him:-- Is a good average batsman and bowler, and in the field he is generally long-leg and cover-point. He played for Surrey occasionally between 1872 and 1883, scoring 302 runs with an average of 11.61, his highest score being 54 not out against Hampshire at the Oval in 1883, the match wherein Surrey totalled 650. For nine years he was captain of the Kingston Town C.C., for which in 1888, when his average was over 54, he played an innings of 284 v. Early Rising Club at Kingston on May 21st, and from 1896 to 1902 was one of the county umpires selected by the M.C.C. On April 28th, 1890, a match between Surrey and XVIII of Kingston was played for his benefit. His father, James Chester, appeared in the county eleven between 1846 and 1858.

LIEUT. JAMES LESLIE CHESTER--9th King's (Liverpool) Regiment--was killed in action on July 6. He was captain of cricket and football at Birkenhead School, and was 22 years old at the time of his death.

CAPT. ESME FAIRFAX CHINNERY (Coldstream Guards and Royal Flying Corps) was killed on January 18 while flying in an aeroplane as a passenger. He was born in 1886 and educated at Eton, where he was in the Eleven in 1905. In the matches against Harrow and Winchester that year he made 74 runs in four innings and obtained three wickets. Since 1910 he had been a member of the M.C.C.

LIEUT. C. G. CLARKE (8th East Yorkshire Regiment), who died of wounds received in action in October, was in the Bradfield Eleven in 1914, when he scored 27 runs in three innings.

2ND LIEUT. WILLIAM HAMILTON CLARKE (3rd Battalion Worcestershire Regiment) fell in action near St. Eloi on March 13, aged 22. As a member of the Rugby Eleven of 1912, he headed the batting averages with 27.08, making 325 runs with 118 not out as his highest score. Against Rugby he failed in batting, making only 10 and 0, but he took four wickets for 34 runs.

PETER CLARKE, who died in Dublin in December, aged about 33, came to the front suddenly in May, 1912, when he was chosen for his googly bowling for the Trial match at the Oval between England and The Rest. In his few representative games in Ireland he had done little against All India, Hampshire, and Cambridge University, and the Oval his solitary wicket cost 68 runs. For Woodbrooke he took many wickets, but for Middlesex (for which county he had a birth qualification) he was not very successful. For three seasons he was on the ground staff at Lord's.

2ND LIEUT. E. D. CLIXBY (4th Lincoln Regiment), who was killed in France in October, aged 20, was educated at Berkhamsted School, where he was in the Eleven in 1912 and two following years. He was a useful batsman, but owed his place in the side chiefly to his bowling. During the three years mentioned he obtained 114 wickets for the School for 16.52 runs each.

MR. WILLIAM BRODRICK CLOETE was born in 1851 and was drowned in the torpedoing of the Lusitania on May 7. Since 1877 he had been a member of the M.C.C., for which he played in many matches. For the Club against Essex at Brentwood in 1877 he bowled unchanged throughout with Rylott, taking six wickets for 74 runs in the first innings and six for 48 in the second. In the same match he also scored 60--the highest innings played for either side--and 9. He was a well-known owner and breeder of race horses. The best horse he ever had was Paradox--second to Melton in the Derby in 1885.

LIEUT. ALAN D. COATES (Yorkshire Regiment) died of wounds on April 28, aged 21. As a left-handed batsman he obtained a place in the Tonbridge School Eleven, whose averages he headed in 1912 with 41.54 for an aggregate of 458 runs. In 1912 he appeared in the Seniors' match at Cambridge, scoring 3 and 8. but was not tried in the Eleven.

MR. JOHN WILLIAM COCKERHAM, J.P., a Vice-President of the Yorkshire County C.C., died at Harrogate on April 24.

CAPT. PHILIP COLLINS (7th Rifle Brigade), who fell in Flanders on July 30, was born at Beckenham on November 8, 1882, and educated at Rugby, where he just missed being in the Eleven. He was a useful run-getter and played chiefly for the Incogniti and Butterflies. In 1913 he accompanied the Incogniti team to America as manager, and was joint author with Mr. Michael Falcon of An Account of the American Tour, 1913. For many years Mr. Collins was Hon. Secretary of the Hockey Association, a position he resigned in 1912, and he acted as the Association's representative at the Olympic Games. He was also a Vice-President of the Hockey Association and Hon. Secretary of the International Board. By profession he was a solicitor.

CAPT. AND ADJUTANT EDWIN READ COLLISSON (1st 6th South Staffordshire Regiment) was killed in action in France on October 13, aged 28. He played both cricket and football for St. Edward's School, Oxford.

CAPTAIN BASIL J. L. CONSTABLE (4th Royal Sussex Regiment), killed in action in September, was honorary secretary of the Littlehampton C.C.

PRIVATE ARNOLD CORDER (7th Durham Light Infantry), a member of the Sunderland first eleven, died of wounds during the week ending June 19.

MR. WILLIAM CORDERY, a member of the once-famous Bramshill C.C., Hampshire, died at Farley Hill, Berkshire, in August, aged 96. He had hunted frequently with the great Duke of Wellington.

MR. THOMAS EDWARD CORNWELL, a former captain of the Bishop Stortford School Eleven, died at Bishop Stortford in the First week of April.

LIEUT. NORMAN JOHN COX (7th Royal Sussex Regiment) was killed in Flanders on august 23, aged 27. He was in the Eleven at Highgate School and subsequently played with some success for Hertfordshire. In 1913 he scored 91 runs for the Country with an average of 22.75, and in 1914 took 26 wickets at a cost of 15.65 runs each.

MR. HAROLD CRABTREE, an assistant-master and house-master, died at Charterhouse on January 28 of heart-failure following pleuro-pneumonia, aged 40. He was in the Charterhouse Eleven in 1890 and three following years, being captain in 1893, when it was said of him:-- Has been a hard-working captain, and had a very successful season; a greatly improved bat, and has on several occasions saved his side from disaster; a brilliant field anywhere. That season he made 322 runs with an average of 21.46, his highest score being 86 not out against Westminster at Vincent Square. He did not obtain his blue at Cambridge.

LIEUT. JOHN MCADAM CRAIG (57th Wildes Rifles) fell in action in France on November 2, 1914, aged 28. He was in the Westminster Eleven of 1905, scoring 145 runs with an average of 12.08.

CAPTAIN ALFRED SACKVILLE CRESWELL (East Kent Regiment) was killed in action on March 14, aged 36. He was a well-known club cricketer, playing for his Regiment, the Band of Brothers and other touring teams. He was a good batsman.

CAPTAIN CHARLES ARTHUR CUNINGHAM (6th Border Regiment) was killed in the Dardanelles on August 16, aged 25. He was not in the Eleven at Cheltenham, but played for Sandhurst in 1909, scoring 35 and taking five wickets for 33 runs against Woolwich, who were beaten by an innings and 104 runs. He played much Army cricket in Aldershot, Ireland, and Burma, and was an all-round athlete.

CAPTAIN WILFRED JOHN HUTTON CURWEN (6th Battalion Royal Fusiliers, attached 3rd Battalion) was killed in action in France on may 13. He was born at Beckenham on April 14, 1883, and was thus 32 years of age at the time of his death. In 1901 and 1902 he was in the Charterhouse Eleven, averaging 22.66 in the former year and 26.00 in the latter. In 1901 also he was second in bowling, taking seventeen wickets for 18.23 runs each. At Oxford he obtained his blue in 1906, scoring 12 not out and 34 not out v. Cambridge, and in his second innings adding 90 runs in fifty-five minutes for the last wicket with E. G. Martin (56). Occasionally he appeared for Surrey, and in 1906-7 was a member of the M.C.C.'s Team to New Zealand. Subsequently he went to Australia as A.D.C. to Sir John Fuller, Lord Denman and Sir Munro Ferguson and during 1911-12 was thus enabled to play for the M.C.C.'s team at Geelong and Ballarat. He was a good batsman and a useful fast-medium bowler. At Oxford he obtained his blue for Association football.

CHARLES FREDERICK DAFT, elder brother of the late Richard Daft, died at Nottingham on March 10, aged 84. He was born at Nottingham on June 8, 1830, and was described in Scores and Biographies as A good and steady batsman...in the field is generally mid-wicket on and long-stop. His career in County cricket was short, extending only from 1862 to 1865. One of his best innings was his 46 v. Kent, at Trent Bridge, in 1864, slowly but well played for. As a cricketer he was somewhat late in coming to the front, and he had almost completed his thirty-second year when he appeared at Lord's for the Colts against M.C.C. In that match he scored 26 and 13 and took five wickets for 34, an all-round feat for which he was called up to the pavilion and presented with a prize bat. For several years he was secretary of the Nottingham Commercial C.C., as well as one of the most useful players in the team.

THE REV. JOHN WALTER DANN, M. A. brother-in-law of the late Dr. W. G. Grace, was born at Fermoy, County Eleven Cork, on November 20, 1842, and died at Downend, of which parish he had been Vicar for 47 years, on July 22. He was never much of a cricketer, but took a keen interest in the game, and played occasionally for the Thornbury and Downend clubs. He took a very active part in the formation of the Gloucestershire County C. C., undertaking practically all the correspondence in the matter for the late Dr. H. M. Grace. In his younger days he was an excellent lawn tennis player, and he played quite a good game until he was 70.

THE REV. EDWARD DAVENPORT, who was born at Oxford on March 26, 1844, died at Stoke Talmage, Oxfordshire, of which parish he had been Rector since 1904, on March 5. In 1861, when he was described as a very steady bat and excellent long stop, he was in the Rugby eleven, being contemporary with M. T. Martin, E. Rutter, C. Booth, F. R. Evans, and B. B. cooper. He played for Oxfordshire in 1863 and 1864, and for Oxford University in 1866, scoring 8 and 17 in the University match which Cambridge lost by 12 runs. His great feat was to score 107 in the M.C.C. match at Oxford in May, 1866, off the bowling of Grundy, Wootton, Mr.Harvey Fellows and Tom Hearne. From 1868 until 1904 he was a master at Wellington College.

COL. WILLIAM LESLIE DAVIDSON, C. B. (Royal Artillery), born on January 30, 1850, died of heart failure in France on August 3 while holding a depot command at the base. He was a fine, free hitter, and represented the Royal Artillery at cricket, football, rackets, and billiards. In 1809 he was in the Woolwich Eleven, scoring 8 and 50 v. Sandhurst, and had been a member of the M.C.C. since 1873. He took part in the Zulu, Afghan and Boer Wars, was mentioned in despatches twice, and received the C. B. in 1901.

CAPT. GEOFFREY BOISSELIER DAVIES (11th Essex Regiment), born on October 26, 1892, fell in action near Hulluch, France, on September 26. In 1909 and three following years he was in the Rossall Eleven, being captain in 1912. His most successful season there was his last, when he made 468 runs with an average of 33.42 scoring 117 v. Shrewsbury and heading the averages, and took forty-one wickets for 14.75 runs each. He had been second in the batting averages in 1910 with 31.07, and first in 1911 with 27.57: in the latter year he also obtained thirty-seven wickets at a cost of 12.67 runs apiece. Proceeding to Cambridge, he at once made his mark, scoring 81 and 18 and taking five wickets for 19 in the second innings of the Freshman's match of 1913. Both in that year and the next he played against Oxford, but hardly did as well as was expected, his four innings producing but 19 runs and his six wickets costing 132 runs. In 1912, 1913, and 1914 he assisted Essex, and there can be but little doubt that, but for the War, he would have developed into an England player. In all first class matches in 1914 he made 852 runs (average 21.30) and took eighty-three wickets (average 19.72): he twice reached three figures, scoring 118 v. Somerset at Weston-super-Mare, and 100 v. Northamptonshire at Leyton. He had good strokes on both sides of the wicket, and was an excellent slip fieldsman. He was an all-round athlete.

SUB-LIEUT. GEORGE LLEWELLYN DAVIES (4th Battalion Rifle Brigade) fell in action on March 15, aged 21. He was in the Eton XI in 1912, when he scored 170 runs with an average of 34.00, and took fifteen wickets for 19.26 runs each. Against Harrow he made 59 and 17, and v. Winchester 42; in the latter match he also obtained four wickets for 18. His bowling was left-hand medium pace.

SIR JAMES STEWART DAVY, K. C. B., born in 1848, died at Wintergreen Wood, Pyford, Surrey, on November 16. He was in the Uppingham XI in 1866 and 1867, and in the latter year was considered one of the most useful members of the side. In his matches against Repton he did little, scoring only 11 runs in three innings. Since 1896 he had been a member of the M.C.C.

THE 8TH EARL DE LA WARR (GILBERT GEORGE REGINALD SACKVILLE) (Lieut R. N. V. R.), born on March 22, 1869, died at Messina on December 16. He was not in the XI whilst at Charterhouse, but was fond of the game, and in 1894 and 1896 got together sides which played the South Africans and Australians respectively at Bexhill. He himself played in both matches, scoring 0 and 8 not out in the first--he was then Viscount Cantelupe--and 1 in the second.

LIEUT. AUBREY CRAWSHAW DENHAM (6th Bedfordshire Battalion), a keen student of cricket lore and a regular contributor to Wisden's Almanack, died at Huddersfield on April 1, aged 33.

He was at first in the O. T. C. at Leeds, but afterwards joined the Royal Naval Division when the commission for which he applied did not arrive. On November 25, however, a letter addressed Lieut. Denham forwarded to him at the Crystal Palace, where he was stationed. Two days later he returned home, only to take to his bed, and there he remained, except for a few hours downstairs about Christmas, until he passed away. He made a close study of the life and times of Napoleon, on which subject he was an authority.

MAJOR WILFRED HARRY DENT (10th Yorkshire Regiment) was killed in action in France on September 27, aged 48. In 1884 and 1885 he was in the Harrow Eleven, averaging 14.20 in the former year and 27.69 in the latter, when he scored 131 against Harrow Town. He had strong defence and could hit well all round, and was also a very good field anywhere. In his matches v. Eton he made 0 and 35, 0 and 6. In 1884 he was in the Football XI. He saw active service in the Chin Hills in Burmah and at the Relief of Pekin in 1900. Since 1887 he had been a member of the M.C.C.

JOSEPH DEXTER, who played occasionally for Leicestershire about 1887 and 1888, died at Nottingham on March 2, aged 52. He was of no account as a batsman, but was a good wicket keeper, and when he played for the Nelson was regarded as the best taking part in Lancashire League matches. For a time he was engaged on the ground staff at the Oval.

LIEUT. CYRIL MAXFIELD DIXON (4th York and Lancaster Regiment) fell in action in France on August 30. He was in the Bradford College Eleven in 1910 and two following years, in 1911 having a batting average of 37.80.

DR. THOMAS JAMES DIXON, born in London on October 6, 1847, died at Potchefstroom (Trasvaal) on April 23. For some years he was one of the leading cricketers in South Africa. At Kroonstad in 1883 he scored 158 not out for Home-Born v. Colonial-Born, and at Kimberley in April, 1890, represented the Transvaal against Kimberley in the first Currie Cup match.

PRIVATE ANDREW THOMAS DOW (10th--formerly 32nd--Overseas Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force) was born at Kinclavin, Scotland, on May 29, 1891, and killed in action on June 9. He was well known in Winnipeg cricket circles as a member of the Young Conservative C.C.

CAPT. GEOFFREY CHARLES WALTER DOWLING (7th King's Royal Rifle Corps) was killed in Flanders on July 30, aged 23. He was in the Charterhouse Eleven in 1908 and two following years, averaging 25.90 in 1908 and 28.60 in 1910. In Public School games his highest scores were 78 not out (going in tenth) v. Westminster in 1908, 57 v. Haverford in 1910, and 31 v. Wellington in 1908. At Cambridge where he did very well indeed in College cricket, he made 60 in the Freshmen's match in 1911, but obtained spectacles in the Seniors' two years later. He appeared for Sussex three times in 1911 and once in 1913, his largest innings being 48 v. Cambridge University at Cambridge, and 33 v. Kent at Tunbridge Wells, both in the former season. In 1913 he became a member of the M.C.C., and playing for the Club at Rye that year against Rye he scored 138, he and R. D. Cochrane (184) adding 294 together for the second wicket.

LIEUT. CAMPBELL. DRUMMOND (8th King's Own Scottish Borderers) was killed in action in France between September the 26th and 29th, aged 26. He was educated at Loretto, where he was in the first XV., and played cricket for Stirling County in 1906 and 1907.

MR. GEORGE M. DUNN, a Northamptonshire man by birth, died at Chicago on March 22, aged 58. For several years he was a useful member of the Wanderers and Pullman Clubs of Chicago.

JOHN WILLIAM EASBY, who died at Dover on February 8, was born at Appleton-upon-Wiske, Yorkshire, on August 12, 1867, He learned his cricket under Major L. A. Hamilton in the King's Own York and Lancaster Regiment, and gave such promise that he was persuaded to leave the Army and accept the position of groundsman to the St. Lawrence C.C., of Canterbury, so as to qualify for Kent. This he did, and the very first time he played on the famous ground he scored 172 not out against Chatham House. That was on June 27th 1892, and six weeks later he made 202 (retired), again for St. Lawrence, v. Holborn. In the following season he punished the South Hampstead bowling for 213. It cannot be said that he accomplished all that was expected of him in county cricket, for in the 62 games wherein he played for Kent between 1894 and 1899 he scored only 1,851 runs with an average of 18.32, his highest innings being 73 not out v. Philadelphians at Maidstone in 1897, and 73 v. Middlesex at Tonbridge in 1895. He had sound defence and many strokes, was a fine field, and could keep wicket well.

MAJOR ERNEST ELLIOT EDLMANN, D.S.O. (R. A., 23rd Peshawar Mountain Battery), who was born in 1869, died on April 17 of wounds received on April 14 at Shaiba, Persian Gulf. He was educated at Leamington College, where he was one of five brothers in the Eleven at various times. In 1887 he played for the R.M.A., Woolwich, having a batting average of 10.16, and being second in the bowling with a record of forty-four wickets for 12.22 runs each. He also appeared occasionally for the West Kent C.C.

MR. WILLIAM EDSER, who was born at West Horsley in 1829 and died at Ripley on May 22, aged 85, was for over forty years a member of the Ripley Eleven, being for many seasons captain. He was over 60 before he gave up active participation in the game, and then he took to umpiring.

LIEUT.-COL. ARTHUR G. E. EGERTON (Commanding 1st Cold-stream Guards) was born in 1879 and fell in action in France on September 29. He was not in the Eleven whilst at Eton, but played for the Guards. He took part in the South African War, and had been wounded a short time before his death.

CAPT. ALFRED CHARLES ERNEST ELBOROUGH (6th King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry) died of wounds received whilst serving in the Expeditionary Force on July 31, aged 37. For four years, commencing 1895, he was in the Blair Lodge XI, being captain in 1897 and 1898, in each of which seasons he headed the batting averages, his figures being 43.06 and 38.05 respectively. He had good defence and was a very useful wicket-keeper.

LIEUT. BASIL HERBERT ELLIS (5th King's Shropshire Light Infantry) was killed in France on June 16, aged 20. A steady and sound batsman, he was in the Shrewsbury Eleven in 1912 and two following years, averaging 28.73 in 1913 and 24.81 in 1914, when the School side was one of the strongest of the season, for five men averaged over 30 and over 20. In 1913 he scored 35 and 38 v. Rossall, 15 and 14 v. Uppingham, and 13 and 38 v. Sedbergh; and in 1914 made 16 and 23 v. Uppingham and 17 and 44 v. Sedbergh.

MAJOR GEORGE ADAMS ELLIS (the Cameronians), who was killed in action on March 14, aged 45, was in the Sherborne Eleven in 1886, 1887, and 1888, in the last-mentioned year being the best all-round man in the team. In 1888 his record was 177 runs with an average of 19.66 and thirty-three wickets for 8.96 runs apiece. He excelled on the football field and as a runner also.

MR. THOMAS EMERY, an all-round player, who appeared in various matches on the old Race-course ground for XXII of Northamptonshire against the All England and United South of England Elevens, died suddenly at Northampton on September 24.

MR. ROWLAND EVANS, one of the founders of the Merion C.C., of Philadelphia, in 1856, died at Ardmore on January 15. He played frequently for the first Eleven of the Club, and afterwards for the veterans. In 1873 he had a prominent share in the purchase of the ground, and in turn held every office in the Club.

LIEUT. (ACTING CAPTAIN) CHARLES HOWARD EYRE (6th King's Royal Rifles) was born at Liverpool on March 26, 1883, and fell in action in France on September 25. He played for Harrow for three years ( 1900 to 1902) and for Cambridge the same period, being captain of each side during his last year, and it is worthy of mention that in his six great matches at Lord's--against Eton and Oxford--he was not once on the losing side. For this happy experience he himself was not largely responsible, as in the games with Eton he made only 68 runs in five innings and in the inter Universities' matches but 75 in six. At Harrow his most successful season was that of 1901, when he obtained 302 runs with an average of 30.20, his highest scores being 105 v. I. Zingari and 100 v. Old Harrovians. His great feat was to make 153 in three hours and a-half, with only one chance, for the University against Yorkshire, at Cambridge, in 1906. That year he had a strong side under him, and his task of selection was unusually easy, seeing that he had eight old blues to choose from. He was a son of the late Archdeacon of Sheffield, and since 1906 had been an assistant-master at Harrow. He joined the M.C.C. in 1904.

CAPTAIN LESLIE SHAW FARQUHARSON (1st Royal Scots), who was killed near Ypres on May 12, aged 30, was in the Charterhouse Eleven in 1902, when he had a batting average of 10.50. In the following year he averaged 7.38 for the R.M.C. Sandhurst.

2ND LIEUT. C. R. FAUSSET (3rd Battalion, attached 1st Royal Irish Regiment), who fell in action in May, rendered excellent service at cricket for Dublin University and Leinster. He was in the Eleven at Rathmines School, and was a good, though patient, batsman, and an all-round athlete. At one time he was mile and quarter-mile champion of Ireland.

LIEUT. JOHN WILLIAM FERGUSON (R.N.V.R.) was born in 1890 and was killed in the Dardanelles on June 7. He was in the Westminster Eleven of 1908, making 38 runs with an average of 7.60 and taking thirteen wickets for 21.15 runs each.

LIEUT. DARE HAMILTON FIELD (2nd London Heavy Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery), an all-round player who had appeared occasionally for Buckinghamshire, fell in action near Ypres on April 23, aged 23. He was born on August 31, 1891. In his first match for the country he made 112 v. Bedfordshire in 1912, and in his last 116 v. M.C.C. and Ground, at Lord's in 1913. At Wellington he headed the batting averages in 1908 with 32.62 and was second to E. L. Kidd in the bowling with 17.85 for forty-two wickets.

2ND LIEUT. OLIVER FIELD (Durham Light Infantry) was killed in action in France on July 18, aged 42. A steady batsman and good field, he was in the Clifton College Eleven in 1890, when he scored 113 runs with an average of 14.12. Proceeding to Oxford, he played for Trinity in 1892 and 1893, averaging 29.00 in the former year and 27.50 in the latter. His highest innings for the College was 100 not out v. Malvern College in 1893. He was a direct descendant of Oliver Cromwell.

CAPT. RICHARD FENWICK FINKE (2nd Royal Sussex Regt.), reported missing believed killed in May, and killed in September, was in the Cheltenham Eleven in 1895 and 1896, averaging 15.42 in the former year and 14.12 in the latter. He was a useful batsman and a smart field at point. He served in the South African War, and was 37 at the time of his death.

MR. A. J. FLEMING, who died at Blackrock, County Dublin, in the first week of November, aged 55, was one of three brothers--A. J., S. H., and W. M.--all prominently identified with the Leinster C. C. He was an excellent batsman, and especially in the late seventies and early eighties made many large scores in good-class cricket in Ireland. His chief successes were for Leinster, Pembroke, and the Gentlemen of Ireland.

LIEUT. ARTHUR CHARLES FLUKE (116th Battery, Royal Field Artillery) was born on September 9, 1891, and killed at Cuinchy on January 10, having previously been mentioned in Despatches. He was in the King's School, Canterbury, Eleven in 1908, 1909, and 1910, being captain the last-mentioned year. In 1911 he led the Woolwich Eleven which was beaten so badly by Sandhurst owing to the remarkable all-round cricket of R. St. L. Fowler.

TROOPER JOHN FLUX (10th Australian Horse), a former captain of cricket and football at Colchester Royal Grammar School, was killed in the Dardanelles in August.

2ND LIEUT. A. L. FORD (12th King's Liverpool Regiment), who died in action in Flanders on September 28, was in the Charterhouse Eleven in 1912 when he scored 206 runs with an average of 22.88 and, taking twenty-seven wickets for 10.37 runs each, headed the bowling averages. Subsequently he played a few times for Durham.

MAJOR HUGH MURRAY FORSTER (8th King's Own Scottish Borderers) died in France on September 28, of wounds received three days earlier, aged 32. He was in the Charterhouse XI in 1901 and 1902, in the former year being fourth in the averages with 34.72 and in the latter seventh with 13.25.

2ND LIEUT. HERBERT GLOYNE FORSTER FORSTER-MORRIS (1st South Wales Borderers) died in France on October 10 of wounds received on September 26th, aged 19. He was a member of the Exeter School Eleven in 1913 and 1914.

LIEUT. JOHN HYLAND FOSDICK (7th rifle Brigade) died in Flanders on July 31, aged 20, of shrapnel wounds in the head. He was in the Charterhouse XI in 1912 and 1913, averaging 26.40 in the former year and 23.23 in the latter. His highest scores in Public School matches were 29 v. Wellington in 1913 and 23 v. Westminster the previous season. In 1914 he played for the Freshmen at Cambridge and also for his college (Pembroke) eleven. As a Freshman he obtained his blue for Association football, and in 1914 visited the Argentine with the Corinthian team.

CAPT. STANLEY FOSTER-JACKSON (6th Manchester Regiment) was killed in the Dardanelles on June 10, aged 28. He was educated at St. Winifred's Kenley, and Shrewsbury, scoring for the latter 99 runs in 1904 with an average of 19.80. He had also played football for Lancashire.

LIEUT. LOUIS RICHARD FOWLE (14th King George's Own Sikhs) was killed in action in the Dardanelles in June, aged 27. In 1904 he was in the Wellington Eleven, taking half-a-dozen wickets in the matches with Charterhouse and Haileybury, and scoring 60 runs in his three innings. At Rugby football he captained the Wellington XV, and played three-quarter for the R.M.C., Sandhurst, and in 1912 won the gold Amateur Golf Championship of North India at Gulmarg, Kashmir.

MR. THOMAS FREDERICK FOWLER was born at Kennington Park, London, on March 12, 1841, and died at Woolston, near Southampton, on January 7. He was in the Uppingham Eleven in 1857 and two following years, being captain in 1859. A resolute hitter, a fast round-armed bowler, and a good field at cover-point, he subsequently obtained his blue for Cambridge, playing against Oxford in 1864. In the great match at Lord's he scored 7 not out and 3, and took one wicket for 18 runs, Oxford winning by four wickets. From 1862 to 1868 he was Hon. Secretary and Captain of the Huntingdonshire C.C.C., and a member of the County team from 1862 to 1879.

CORP. THEODORE HUMPHRY FOWLER (Honorable Artillery Company) died in the London County Hospital, Epsom, on August 17, after an operation for hernia. He was born on September 25, 1879, and was thus in his thirty-sixth year at the time of his death. In 1894 and three following seasons he was in the Lancing Eleven, being captain in 1897. His most successful year was 1896, when he made 457 runs with an average of 45.70. He could hit hard when necessary, and was a useful wicket-keeper, and for two seasons he won all the long-distance races at the College. Between 1901 and 1914 he played cricket for Gloucestershire (by birth) and Dorset, his most noteworthy feat being to make 114 for the former against London County at the Crystal Palace in 1903, when he and Wrathall (160) scored 277 together for the first wicket. He was twice wounded in action, and twice declined a commission.

LIEUT.-COLONEL FREDERICK CHARLES RANCE-HAYHURST (4th Battalion Royal Welsh Fusiliers) was born on April 23, 1872, and was killed in action in France on May 9. He was in the Eton Eleven of 1891, when he was described as: A dashing but very uncertain player, very dangerous when set, hitting very hard all round; safe field. Against Winchester he scored 29 and 4 and v. Harrow 0 and 14. He had been a member of the M.C.C. since 1892.

SIR JOHN MICHAEL FLEETWOOD FULLER, 1st Bart., K.C.M.G., who was born on October 21, 1864, died at Melksham, Wiltshire, on September 4 of heart failure following an operation. In 1882, when he played an innings of 46 v. Eton, he was in the Winchester XI, scoring that year 146 runs with an average of 15.11 and taking eight wickets for 13.12 runs each. He was then described as A useful man in the Eleven, having no special excellence in any one department, but being fairly good all-round and having quite justified his place. At Oxford he failed to obtain his blue, but he represented the University at polo against Cambridge in 1885. Since 1886 he had been a member of the M.C.C., and he was prominently identified with Wiltshire cricket. He was aide-de-camp to the Viceroy of India in 1894-5, and M. P. (Liberal) for the Westbury Division of Wiltshire in 1910-11, after three unsuccessful attempts to enter Parliament. From 1911 to 1914 he was Governor of Victoria.

LIEUT. H. F. GARRETT (9th Service Battalion East Yorkshire Regiment) was killed in the Dardanelles in July. He was an excellent bat and effective googly bowler, but did not obtain a place in the Cambridge Eleven. In the Eastbourne Week of 1913 he bowled very effectively for Mr. H. D. G. Leveson Gower's XI., his analyses against Cambridge University being three for 31 and five for 39, and against Oxford six for 60 and four for 32. In all first-class matches that season he made 209 runs with an average of 13.06 and took thirty-two wickets for 20.93 runs apiece. He was well-known in Eastbourne club cricket, and appeared occasionally for Somerset.

CAPT. JOHN GEDDES (79th Highlanders), who was born in Chicago was killed in action in Flanders. He was not in the Eleven whilst at Rugby, but upon settling in Winnipeg in 1903 played much in club cricket. He was born on November 6, 1879, and died April 23, 1915.

2ND LIEUT. WILLIAM PURDON GEEN (9th Battalion King's Royal Rifle Corps) was born on March 14, 1891, and killed at the Dardanelles in the first week of August. In 1907 and three following years he was in the Haileybury Eleven, his most successful season being his last, when he was second in the averages with 28.00, and played an innings of 54 v. Uppingham. In 1910, 1911, and 1912 he appeared occasionally for Monmouthshire.

THE REV. HUGH HODGSON GILLETT, born at Waltham, Melton-Mowbray, on June 19, 1836, died at Thornbury, Gloucestershire, on January 22. He was in the Winchester XI in 1851 and next three years, his most successful season being his last, when he made 7 and 41 and took five wickets v. Eton, and scored 15 and 32 and obtained seven wickets v. Harrow. In 1857 and 1858 he played for Oxford v. Cambridge, being thus a contemporary of C. D. Marsham, A. P. Law, C. G. Lane, and W. F. Trail. In the second innings of the 1857 match he took five wickets for 46 runs. Scores and Biographies said of him:-- Is a very hard hitter indeed, and bowls round-armed of middle speed......In the field generally long-leg or cover point. In a minor match on July 11th, 1859, for Henry Box's Xiv. Chew Stoke at Chewton Mendip, he made 166 in a total of 251 (including 14 extras), going in first and carrying his bat through the innings.

CAPT. MARMADUKE WHITTAKER GRAHAM (2nd Battalion Royal West Kent Regiment) was born on March 18, 1879, and fell in action in Mesopotamia on July 24. He was educated at Sedbergh and Malvern, being in the latter Eleven in 1897, when he made 268 runs with an average of 22.33.

2ND LIEUT. HUGO FREDERICK GRANTHAM (1st Essex Regiment), grandson of the late Mr. Justice Grantham, was killed in action at the Dardanelles on June 28, aged 20. He was a very useful cricketer, playing for the Witham C.C., but did not obtain a place in the Eleven at Cheltenham.

LIEUT. E. T. GRAY (15th Durham Light Infantry) was born at South Moor, Durham, on December the 1st, 1895, and killed in France on October 21 or 23, aged 19. He was in the St. John's School, Leatherhead, Eleven in 1914, scoring 68 runs with an average of 7.33.

LIEUT. MAGNUS NIGEL GRAY (Cameronians), who died of wounds on June 21, aged 20, was in the Loretto Eleven in 1911 and two following seasons, being captain in 1913. He was a good wicket-keeper and a useful batsman, averaging 17.88 in 1912 and 14.33 in 1913. He was also captain of the Rugby XV.

CAPT. FRANCIS OCTAVIOUS GRENFELL, V.C. (9th Lancers), born on September 4, 1880, fell in action on May 24. In 1899 he was a member of the Eton XI under W. Findlay's captaincy, scoring 327 runs with an average of 40.87: his highest innings was 136 not out v. I. Zingari. He did not play in the Winchester match, but against Harrow scored 28 and 81, he and H. K. Longman making 167 together in two and a quarter hours in the second innings for the first wicket. That year it was said of him:-- In batting he has the highest average, and has made the only century for the school; he bats in a taking style and scores quickly; he watches the ball well, and makes good strokes all round the wicket. He took part in the South African War in 1901-2, receiving the Queen's Medal with five clasps, and he was the first officer in the Army to gain the V.C. in the present War. The action for which he was awarded the latter was described in the London Gazette in these terms:-- For gallantry in action against unbroken infantry at Andregnies, Belgium, on 24th August, 1914, and for gallant conduct in assisting to save the guns of the 119th Battery Royal Field Artillery, near Doubon, the same day. Twice he had returned to England badly wounded.

LIEUT. WILFRID HANBURY GRENVILLE-GREY (1st Battalion King's Royal Rifles) was killed in action on May 15, aged 20. He was in the Wellington XI in 1912, scoring 48 runs in six innings and taking ten wickets for 232 runs. He was a fine rider and athlete, and represented both Wellington and Sandhurst at rackets.

LIEUT. GEORGE EDWARD GRUNDY (9th Royal Warwickshire Regiment) was killed in the Dardanelles on July 22, aged 32. With C. C. Page, G. N. Foster and the late W. S. Bird, he was in the Malvern Eleven in 1902, scoring 261 runs with an average of 20.07. His highest score that season was 91, but he was unfortunate enough to obtain spectacles against Repton. He did not obtain his blue at Oxford, but was captain of the Brasenose cricket and football elevens, and represented the University at golf for three years.

CAPT. EDWARD HAIN (royal 1st Devon Yeomanry), born on August 15, 1887, fell in action at the Dardanelles in November. In 1906, when he headed the Winchester averages with 67.66, he played a good forcing innings of 60 against Eton. In the following season he scored 26 in the Oxford Freshmen's match, but did not obtain his blue.

MR. JOHN HALES, born at Charmouth, Dorset, on September 16th, 1833, died at Bournemouth, on January 25. He was described as an excellent cricketer who combines great power of defence with superior hitting, and, after failing to obtain a place in the Rugby Eleven, played for Cambridge in 1855 and 1856, scoring 35 runs in his four innings. In the former season he made 22 and 22 not out against Buttress, and in 1856 scored 33 v. Old Cambridge Men, who had Messrs. Kempson, Drake, and Blore to bowl for them. His name will occasionally be found in matches played by the Yorkshire Gentlemen and Civil Service. In club cricket his fast-medium round-armed bowling was often successful.

Louis Hall, the famous Yorkshire batsman, died at Morecambe on November 19. He was born at Batley on the 1st of November, 1852. Hall played his first match for Yorkshire at Prince's Ground against Middlesex in 1873, but his real career in the county eleven dated from 1878. He had been almost forgotten when an innings of 78 for a local eighteen against the first Australian Eleven revealed his full powers. Few English batsmen had up to that time met with much success against the great Australian bowlers, and this one performance established Hall's reputation. He went back at once to the Yorkshire team and kept his place without a break till 1892. For a few seasons he did nothing exceptional, but in 1883 he took a big step to the front, scoring 911 runs for the county and, with ten not outs to help him, averaging 43. His best season of all was 1887--a summer of sunshine and hard wickets--when he made 1,544 runs with an average of 41. Hall was in the strict sense of the words an old-fashioned batsman, trusting as much for defence to forward play as the men of Fuller Pilch's day. It cannot be said that he was an attractive bat to watch--he was at times a veritable stonewaller--but in the Yorkshire eleven which included George Ulyett and William Bates his stubborn defence was of priceless value. In match after match he kept up his wicket while one or other of those brilliant hitters demoralised the bowling. He and Ulyett on eleven occasions sent up the hundred for Yorkshire's first wicket. Once--against Sussex at Brighton in 1885--they scored the hundred together in both innings. Hall made fifteen hundreds during his career--all but two of them for Yorkshire--and seventeen times he carried his bat right through an innings. His greatest success was in the Yorkshire and Middlesex match at Sheffield in 1884 when he scored 96 and 135. He was not often chosen for Players against Gentlemen, but he played at Lord's in 1883, 1884, and 1885, and at the Oval in 1884. Not much success rewarded him in these games, his best score being 32 at Lord's in 1883. He was given the Surrey match for his benefit at Sheffield in 1891, and profited to theextent of £570. A quiet man of very careful habits, Hall enjoyed the good opinion of everyone who knew him. After his active career in the cricket field had come to an end he was for some time coach at Uppingham School. Hall appeared in 336 matches for Yorkshire, batting in 334 of them. He also bowled in 67 of the games, taking 33 wickets for 34.06 runs each.

2ND LIEUT. GARETH HAMILTON-FLETCHER (3rd Grenadier Guards, attached 1st Scots Guards) was killed in action at Cuinchy on January 25. In 1912 and 1913 he was in the Eton Eleven, in the former year scoring 206 runs with an average of 34.33, giving promise of future excellence which unfortunately was not realized, for in 1913 he was last in the list with 6.45. In his four Public School matches he made 59 runs in five innings, obtaining spectacles v Harrow in 1913. He was excellent at cover-point.

LIEUT. R. HARTLEY (10th Worcestershire Regiment), who was killed in France on October 26, aged 24, was in the Eleven at Bromsgrove School and New college, Oxford.

CAPT. C. B. HAYES (10th Hants. Regiment), who was killed in the Dardanelles on September 10th aged 21, was a useful all-round player who was in the Campbell College Eleven, of Belfast, in 1911 and 1912.

MR. EDWARD BROWNLOW HAYGARTH, born on April 26th 1864, died at Siddington Manor, Cirencester, on April 14th aged 50. He was brother of Messrs. F. and J. W. Haygarth, both of whom were in the Winchester Eleven, and cousin of Mr. Arthur Haygarth, the Old Harrovian, and himself played for Lancing for three seasons commencing 1868. Later he appeared for Hampshire in 1875 and for Gloucestershire in 1883, but without much success. He was described as A fair wicket-keeper and good bat on his day.

MR. GERVYS R. HAZLITT, who was born in New South Wales on September 4, 1888, died on October 31, aged 27. A very useful all-round cricketer, he made his first appearance for Victoria in 1905-6, when only 17, and during the next few seasons was one of the most promising players in Australia. In 1906-7 he made 52 for Rest of Australia v. New South Wales, and in the following season appeared in a couple of Test matches against England, and by an innings of 34 at a critical period helped largely to gain a victory by two wickets for his side at Sydney. He also bowled well for his State that year, taking seven wickets for 127 runs v. England, and six for 134 v. South Australia at Melbourne. In 1908-9 he obtained eight for 99--three for 19 and five for 80--v. South Australia on the last-mentioned ground, and later in the season scored 62 for Rest of Australia v. The Australian Team at Sydney. His form at that time was so good that he only just failed to be chosen for the trip to England. In 1909-10 he took part in only two big matches, but in one of them--v. South Australia at Adelaide--scored 82 not out, adding 126 for the eight wicket with Dr. N. L. Speirs (49) after seven had fallen for 140. At Melbourne in 1910-11 he made 77 v. South Australia at Melbourne, and a year later, upon accepting a mastership at The King's School, Parramatta, assisted New South Wales, for which State he was qualified by birth. During 1911-12 he took nine wickets for 104 v. South Australia at Sydney, and on the same run-getting paradise, six for 140 v. Victoria and seven for 95 v. England: he also played in the fifth Test match, in which his four wickets cost 31.75 runs each. He visited England in 1912, and although his batting was disappointing--his highest score was only 35 not out v. Cambridge University--he took 101 wickets for slightly under 19 runs each. For some time he had eye trouble. Being obliged to undergo an operation, and doubtless this militated against his success. His great feat was performed in the Test match against England at the Oval, when he took seven wickets for 25 runs in the second innings, at one period taking five for 1 in seventeen balls (including four without a run in ten). But forthis very pronounced success it is certain that Australia would have saved the game, for within half-an-hour after England had won the rain descended in torrents and further play would have been impossible. In the same match he made a most brilliant catch at shortleg which dismissed Spooner. During the early part of the tour he undoubtedly threw a good deal, but he bowled with a straighter arm later. His visit to England practically marked the end of his career in first-class cricket. His bowling was medium-paced, right-hand, with a useful off-break and much swerve. In the field he was excellent. Before appearing in first-class cricket he was coached by Carpenter, of Essex.

2ND LIEUT. CECIL AMBROSE HEAL (3rd Wiltshire Regiment, attached 1st) was wounded in Flanders on June 29, after being two days at the front, and died on July 3, aged 18. He was in the Marlborough Eleven in 1914, taking fifteen wickets and scoring 72 runs with an average of 8.00.

LIEUT. RONALD YOUNG HEDDERWICK (Honorable Artillery Company), who was killed near Ypres on May 16, aged 27, was in the Haileybury Eleven in 1905 and two following seasons. In 1906 he averaged 21.22 and a year later 28.15.

2ND LIEUT. RALPH EUSTACE HEMINGWAY (8th Sherwood Foresters) was born on December 15, 1877, and killed in action in France on October 14. He was not in the Eleven whilst at Uppingham, but subsequently made some good scores by hard hitting for Nottinghamshire. Perhaps it was in 1904 that he was seen at his best, for that season he scored 300 runs in first-class cricket with an average of 23.07. Against the South Africans he made 85 and 30, he and George Gunn (143) obtained 165 together for the opening partnership in the first innings. A year later, when he played more frequently, he scored 84 against Sussex at Brighton, and in the course of a week at the end of that season had the curious experience of assisting the North v. South at Blackpool and the Gentlemen of the South v. Players of the South at Bournemouth.

2ND LIEUT. ANDREW HUBERT MILLIN HENDERSON (King's Own Scottish Borderers, 4th Battalion), who fell in action at the Dardanelles on July 12, aged 27, gained distinction at Edinburgh University for cricket and hockey, for which he got his half-blue.

LIEUT. H. G. HICKSON (6th Leinster Regiment), killed at the Dardanelles in August, aged 21, was educated at the Royal Naval college, Eltham, where he was in the Eleven.

MAJOR CHARLES ERNEST HIGGINBOTHAM (2nd Battalion Northmapton Regiment), who was born in July, 1866, was killed at Neuve Chapelle on March 11, aged 48. He was a hard-hitting batsman and a smart field, and in 1884 was in the Rugby Eleven, scoring 7 not out and 2 v. Marlborough. For Sandhurst v. Woolwich in 1886 he played useful inings of 24 and 40, and four years later was a member of the Straits Settlement team which visited Hong Kong. For some seasons he captained the Aldershot Officers' XI, succeeding R. M. Poore in 1911, and in the year mentioned and 1912 played for Army v. Royal Navy at Lord's obtaining 61 runs with an average of 20.33. He had, too been a member of the M.C.C. since 1896. In scoring 117 for Aldershot Command v. United Services at Portsmouth, in June, 1910, he and Capt. E. L. Challenor (170) made 297 together for the first wicket. He married a daughter of the Rt. Hon. James Round, the old Eton and Essex cricketer, and served in the South African war.

2ND LIEUT. ARTHUR LIONEL HILL (1st Middlesex Regiment), who was killed in France on September 25, aged 24, was in the Radley College Eleven in 1907 and 1908.

THE REV. EVELYN HENRY HILL, born in 1859, died at Droitwich on April 21. He was in the Malvern XI in 1876 and 1877, in the latter year being described as A hard hitter with a fair defence; a successful though sometimes rather expensive lob bowler; fair field. At Oxford he was not in the University Eleven, but played for his college (Oriel), and obtained his blue for Association football. From 1896 to 1911 he was Vicar of Brereton, Staffordshire.

RIFLEMAN PAUL JAMES HILLEARD (12th London (Rangers) Regiment) died in May, aged 21, of wounds received near Ypres on April 23. He was a very useful all-round cricketer and in 1914 headed the batting averages of Essex 2nd XI with 27.28, his highest innings being 85 not out v. Surrey 2nd XI, at Leyton. He was an all-round athlete.

2ND LIEUT. CYRIL ANTHONY HUDSON HILLIER died on February 6, aged 17, at the Empress Eugenie's Hospital, Farnborough, of wounds received in action on January 26th. He was in the Cheltenham Eleven in 1913 and 1914, in the latter year scoring 345 runs with an average of 34.50, his highest innings being 72. In the Public School matches his best scores were 54 v. Marlborough and 61 v. Clifton, both in 1914. He had very strong defence, but many good strokes. In 1914 he appeared in a few games for Suffolk.

MR. JOHN HINCHLIFFE, born in New York City on May 19, 1850, died at St. Augustine, Florida, on March 18. He was a liberal patron of the game in America, being President of the Paterson C.C. (New Jersey) for many years and a useful member of the team, President of the Metropolitan District Cricket League in 1906, and a member of the New York Veterans Cricket Association.

SIR SAMUEL HOARE, 1st Bart., born at Hampstead on September 7, 1841, died at Bournemouth on January 20. In 1858 an 1859 he was in the Harrow XI, under the captaincy of R. Lang, scoring 4 and 6 not out in his two matches with Eton and each time being on the winning side. As a long-stop he was excellent, and it was said that without him Lang, who took nine Eton wickets for 66 runs, would probably not have bowled in the 1859 game as he was so fast and erratic that he would have been too expensive Good though he undoubtedly was in that position, Hoare did not obtain his blue at Cambridge, finding a rival in Herbert Marshall, who stopped Lang's bowling very successfully. Before going to Harrow, Sir Samuel had learned the game at Bayford, where he was given his colours by R. D. Walker. He was for many years a partner in the banking firm of Barnetts, Hoares and Co., and M.P. for Norwich in the Conservative interests from 1886 to 1906. He had been a member of the M.C.C. since 1864.

MAJOR VICENT ROBERTSON HOARE (The Rangers, 12th Company of London Regiment), who was born on March 15, 1873, was killed in action on February 15, aged 41. He was educated at Eton, where he was in the Eleven, besides being in the Field and winner of the School Fives. In his six Public School matches--v. Harrow and Winchester in 1890 and two following years--he scored 222 runs in ten innings and took sixteen wickets. Against Winchester he was very successful in his last two seasons, making 1 and 56 and obtaining six wickets in 1891, and scoring 53 and 63 and taking five for 62 in the first innings in 1892. During his last year it was said of him:-- Heads the averages (29.38); a fine, commanding bat, at times too eager to score, especially off the leg-stump; has been exceedingly useful; a steady medium bowler, and an excellent field. Since 1893 he had been a member of the M.C.C. He served in the South African War as a trooper in the Suffolk Yeomanry, afterwards gaining a commission.

2ND LIEUT. HAROLD WARDALE HODGES (2nd Battalion King's Royal Rifles Corps) was killed in action on May 9, aged 21. In 1912 he was the Epsom College XI, scoring 186 runs with an average of 16.82.

THE REV. GEORGE LANGTON HODGKINSON, born at Kentish Town on October 13, 1837, died at Chipping manor, Wotton-under-Edge, Gloucestershire, on February 16. Scores and Biographies said of him: Is a pretty batsman, being a good forward player and leg hitter. Also a fine field and catch, generally taking cover-slip, and an excellent shot at the wicket. He was in the Harrow Eleven in 1854 and two following years, and in his two matches against Eton (both of which Harrow won)--the side did not meet in 1856--scored 17 runs in three innings. At Oxford he obtained his blue as a freshman, but in his three matches against Cambridge did very little, scoring but 15 runs in five innings. That he was regarded as a good player, however, is evident from the fact that in 1858 he appeared at the Oval for Gentlemen v. Players, scoring 3 and 5 and taking one wicket--Caffyn's--for 13 runs. In 1861 he assisted Middlesex against M.C.C. and Ground at Lord's scoring 22. Since 1876 he had been Prebendary of Lincoln Cathedral.

CAPT. BERNARD HENRY HOLLOWAY (9th Battalion Royal Sussex Regiment), brother of Mr. N. J. Holloway, the Cambridge blue, was born in Surrey on January 13, 1888, and killed in France on September 27. In 1904 and three following years he was in the Leys School XI, being a very useful all-round player, and proving himself a good captain. He was third in the batting averages in 1904, second in 1905 and 1906--in the later year with 35.81--and top in 1907, when his figure was 35.75. In the last-mentioned season he also took twenty-two wickets for 14.59 runs each. At Cambridge, where he did not obtain his blue, he did little in the trial games save in 1911 when, in the Seniors' match, he scored 52 and made 133 for the first wicket with C. G. Forbes-Adam (78). During 1910-11 he visited the West Indies as a member of the M.C.C. team and, making 443 runs with an average of 24.61, rendered excellent service: his highest score was 100 v. British Guiana at Georgetown. In 1911 and three following seasons he appeared occasionally for Sussex, for which side his best performances were against his old University, on the Cambridge ground, in 1913 and 1914, his scores being 58 not out and 32 not out, and 54 and 15. He played half-back at Rugby football for Cambridge v. Oxford in 1907, and centre three-quarter back in 1909. He was also in the University Lacrosse XII in 1908-9-10, being captain in 1910, in which year he played at the game for England.

2ND LIEUT. GEOFFREY WILLIAM VAN-DER-BLY HOPLEY (2nd Battalion Grenadier Guards) died at the age of 23 on May 12 in the Military Hospital at Boulogne-sur-Mer, having been severely wounded in Flanders on February 3. He was in the Harrow Eleven in 1909 and 1910, in the latter season being second in the batting averages with 27.18. In his two matches against Eton he scored 1 and 23, 35 and 8. Proceeding to Cambridge, he obtained his blue in 1912, making 14 and 6 not out v. Oxford, but was unable to keep his place in either of the two following years. In 1914 he gave every promise of regaining a position in the side, scoring 29 and 120 in the Seniors' Match and 86 and 68 in a Trial game, but later he was quite out of form. In 1912 he won the heavy-weight boxing for Cambridge. He was brother of Mr. F. J. V. Hopley, and had been a member of the M.C.C. since 1911.

2ND LIEUTENANT JOHN HOWELL (King's Royal Corps), was killed in Flanders on September 25. Among all the young cricketers who have fallen in the War not one of brighter promise than John Howell can be named. Judging from his wonderful record at Repton it is not too much to say that he was potentially an England batsman. But for the War he would have been at Oxford last year and would no doubt have been seen in the Surrey eleven at the Oval. Born on the 5th of July, 1895, he was only twenty when he lost his life. He was in the Repton team for four seasons-- 1911 to 1914--being captain in 1914. From the first he showed-great promise as a batsman, his style having obviously been modelled on that of Tom Hayward. He did well in 1911 and 1912, and in the next two years he was probably the best school bat in England. In 1913 he scored 737 runs for Repton, with an average of 56, and in 1914, 686 runs with an average of 52. He took some little time to find his form in school cricket in 1914, but he scored 202 not out against the Old Reptonians and 202 against Uppingham. In a trial match at the Oval at the beginning of the seasons he played an innings of 109. In 1913 he scored 108 and 114 against the Old Reptonians, and 144 for Young Surrey Amateurs against Young Essex Amateurs. Towards the close of the season in 1913 he journeyed up to Walsall with Surrey's Second Eleven for the express journeyed up to Walsall with Surrey's Second Eleven for the express purpose of playing against Barnes's bowling and had the satisfaction of scoring 45.

2ND LIEUT. HUGH MICHAEL HUNTER (Wiltshire Regiment), born on august 20, 1891, died at Boulogne from wounds received at Neuve Chapelle on April 6. He was in the Winchester Eleven in 1910, when he took twenty-one wickets for 21.42 runs each, and (being not-out in eight of the eleven innings he commenced) averaged 20.66 with the bat. Against Eton he made 3 not out and took two wickets for 31 runs. He did not obtain his blue at Oxford. In 1913 he was elected a member of the M.C.C.

2ND LIEUT. CECIL HURST-BROWN (Oxford and Bucks. Light Infantry) died on September 26, aged 21, of wounds received in France the previous day. In 1912 and 1913 he was in the Westminster Eleven, averaging 14.60 and 19.00 in the respective seasons. He was also in the football team for two years.

LIEUT. DONALD HERBERT HUTCHISON (London Regiment 16th Battalion queen's Westminster Rifles), born in Yokohama on august 11, 1895, was killed in Flanders on his twentieth birthday. He was an all-round athlete and for several seasons in the Merchiston Eleven.

CAPT. JOHN EDMUND VALENTINE ISAAC, D.S.O. (2nd Battalion Rifle Brigade) was born in February, 1880, and killed in action in France on May 9, having previously been mentioned in despatches, and wounded on October 24. He was not in the Eleven whilst at Harrow, but played occasionally for Worcestershire in 1907 and 1908, and had been a member of the M.C.C. since 1903. His name will occasionally be found in Free Foresters matches. During the South Africa campaign he was severely wounded at Nooitgedacht in December, 1900. He was a well-known gentleman jockey, and in 1911 rode the winner of the Cairo Grand National.

CAPT. ARTHUR JAQUES (12th West Yorkshire Regiment), who was born at Shanghai on March 7, 1888, fell in action in France at the end of September. In 1905 and two following years he was in the Aldinham XI, in 1907 having a batting average of 20, and heading the bowling with a record of forty-three wickets for 10.74 runs each. Subsequently he appeared with pronounced success for Hampshire. In 1913, his first season as a regular player for the County, he did nothing remarkable, but in 1914 in championship matches alone he obtained 112 wickets for 18.26 runs each. Doubtless his unusual methods contributed much to his success, for, placing nearly all his field on the on-side, he pitched on the wicket or outside the leg-stump, and, swinging-in and getting on an off-break, cramped the batsmen so much that many of them lost patience and succumbed. That year he assisted the Gentlemen both at Lord's and the Oval, but took only two wickets in the two games for 73 runs. His best analyses during the season--all for Hampshire--were fourteen for 105 (including eight for 67) v. Derbyshire at Basingstoke; fourteen for 54 including eight for 21) v. Somerset at Bath (he and Kennedy bowling unchanged throughout), and seven for 51 v. Warwickshire at Southampton. In all first-class matches during 1914 he obtained 117 wickets for 18.69 runs each. It is interesting to recall that at Cambridge he was never tried in the Eleven, although he played for the Freshmen in 1908 and the Seniors in 1909 and 1910, and that when he went to the West Indies in 1912-13 as a member of the M.C.C. team his five wickets cost 29 runs each. He was 6ft 3in. in height.

2ND LIEUT. BURNET G. JAMES (R.F.A., attached to Flying Corps) fell in action in France at the end of September. For five years he was captain of the Bristol Imperial C.C., for which his batting average in 1914 was over 100. In the season mentioned he appeared on a few occasions for Gloucestershire, but with small success, scoring only 27 runs with an average of 5.40. He also represented Gloucestershire at hockey.

LANCE-CORPL. HAROLD GEORGE JEFFERIES (Berkshire Yeomanry) fell in action at Burnt Hill, Gallipoli, on august 21, aged 22. He was well-known as an all-round cricketer in the Windsor district, and was a keen Association football player.

THE 7TH EARL OF JERSEY (VICTOR ALBERT GEORGE CHILDVILLIERS), P.C., G.C.B., G.C.M.G., who was born on March 20, 1845, died at Osterley Park, Isleworth, on May 31. He was educated at Eton and Oxford, but was in neither Eleven. He was, however, prominently identified with the M.C.C., having been a member of the club since 1865, its President in 1894 and a Committeeman 1895-98, 1902-05, and 1908-11. In 1865 he represented Oxford in the mile race v. Cambridge, being second to Lord Alverstone (then R. E. Webster), and in the two-mile, being fourth.

CAPT. ERNEST NEVILL JOURDAIN (1st Suffolk Regiment), who was killed in March, aged 34, was a very useful player, although not in the Eleven Whilst at Haileybury. He was, however, captain of the regimental cricket and hockey teams. He served throughout the South African War with the Mounted Infantry, and won for himself the Queen's medal with three clasps, and the King's medal with two.

2ND LIEUT. GEORGE FRANCIS JUCKES (6th Rifle Brigade), who fell in action on July 8, aged 20, was in the King's School, Canterbury Eleven, in 1912, when he made 142 runs with an average of 15.80.

MR. WILFRID JOHN KEMPE, born in 1849, died at Long Ashton, near Bristol, on August 31. He was in the Bromsgrove School Eleven in 1866 and two following years.

2ND LIEUT. THOMAS CHRISTIE KENNEDY (Royal Field Artillery) who was born at Muzaffarpur, Bengal, in October, 1896, was killed in action in France on November 25. He was educated at Edinburgh Academy, where he was in the Eleven in 1912 and two following seasons. In his last season he headed the batting averages with 40.08, making 561 runs with 172 as his highest score, and took twenty-eight wickets for 19.50 runs each.

2ND LIEUT. JOHN DE WINTON KENYON (4th Battalion King's Liverpool Regiment) was born in 1896, and killed on May 18. He was in Giggleswick School Eleven in 1913 and 1914.

LIEUT P. M. KERWOOD (8th Worcestershire Regiment), who fell in France on June 26, was a former captain of the Bromsgrove School Eleven.

COL. HENRY BLLOMFIELD KINGSCOTE, born at Kingscote (Gloucestershire), on February 28, 1843, died in London on the last of August. He was nephew of the famous Henry Kingscote, and was described in Scores and Biographies as An excellent wicket-keeper and a fine, free hitter, his scores being very large. He entered the Royal Artillery in 1862 and kept wicket for them from 1864 until 1881, but his military duties prevented him from assisting Gloucestershire more than very occasionally. He joined the M. C. C. in 1864, and when playing for the Club against Kent at Canterbury in 1877 caught three and stumped five. Between 1882 and 1889 he took part in many matches in India and was interested in the game to the last, being a regular visitor both at Lord's and the Oval, at the former ground especially. In the Army v. Bar matches at Lord's he generally chose the former team and Mr. R. D. Walker the latter.

CAPT. RONALD OWEN LAGDEN (King's Royal Riffles), born on November 21, 1889, was killed on March 1, when in command of a company leading an attack on enemy trenches. In 1906 and two following years he was in the Marlborough Eleven, in 1907 being second in batting and first in bowling, and in his last season heading the batting averages with 52.54. In 1908 he performed the remarkable feat of scoring 149 not out and 102 in the match with Liverpool, all the runs being made on the second day: he also played an innings of 84 v. Rugby, and scored 64, besides taking six wickets, v. Cheltenham. His form caused him to be picked for the Public School XI v. M.C.C. at Lord's, a match wherein he made 33 and 0 and proved the most successful bowler with an analysis of seven for 167. Obtaining his blue as a Freshman at Oxford, he played four times at Lord's against Cambridge, by far his highest score in the matches being 68 in 1912. In bowling he took three wickets for 35 in 1910-- Le Couteur's match--five for 118 the next year, and four for 79 in 1912. In the last-mentioned season he headed the University's batting averages with 54.25, with 99 not out against Mr. H. D. G. Leveson-Gower's XI at Eastbourne as his highest effort. He represented Oxford against Cambridge at cricket, Rugby football, rackets, and hockey, and was also a Rugby international. He was elder brother of Mr. R. B. Lagden (of Marlborough, Cambridge University and Surrey), and had been a member of the M.C.C. since 1913.

PRIVATE WILLIAM LAMB (5th Royal Scots, Queen's, Edinburgh), who was killed in the Dardanelles on May 8, was educated at George Heriot's School, Edinburgh, where he was in both the Eleven and XV.

GEORGE LAMBERT, born on May 31, 1842, died in London on the 1st of August. For many years he was Tennis Master at Lord's, and as a player was unrivalled from 1871 to 1885, being at his best in 1872-73-74. He was a useful cricketer, being a hard hitter to leg--he once hit a ball over the roof of the old Tennis court at Lord's--and a good slow bowler. He was the chief promoter of the old St. John's Wood Ramblers C.C., the membership of which was composed of those employed at or connected with Lord's.

LIEUT. JAMES EDWARD DOWNES LAMBERT (6th Northamptonshire Regt.) was killed in action in France on November 1, aged 20. In 1913 and 1914 he was in the Bedford Grammar School XI's in the latter year scoring 100 v. Leys School and averaging 24.20. He was an all-round athlete, representing his School at cricket, football, running and fencing.

2ND LIEUT. ARTHUR HORACE LANG (Grenadier Guards, attached to Scots Guards) was born at Bombay on October 25, 1890 and was reported Missing, believed killed on or about January 26. Since then no news has been received, and his family and friends have abandoned hope. He was in the Harrow Eleven in 1906 and three following years, being captain in 1908 and 1909, in each of which seasons he was chosen for the Public School v. M.C.C. match at Lord's. In addition to being a sound batsmen--he averaged over 20 in three of the four years mentioned--he was an excellent wicket-keeper, and in the game with Eton in 1907 made four catches in each innings. At Cambridge he did not receive his blue until 1913, when he scored 28 and 4 against Oxford and stumped three. From 1907 to 1911 he assisted Suffolk, and in 1912 and 1913 Sussex, in the last mentioned year scoring 141 v. Somerset at Eastbourne, and 104 v. Cambridge University at Cambridge. He had been a member of the M.C.C. since 1910.

MAJOR HARRY ASTELL LANG (4th Worcestershire Regiment) was born in March, 1874, and killed in the Dardanelles in June. He was a very useful cricketer and captained his regimental team. He took part in the South African war, being slightly wounded.

CAPT. EDWARD GEORGE LANGDALE (1st Battalion 5th Leicestershire Regiment) was killed in action in France on October 13, aged 32. He was educated at Eastburne College, where he was in the Eleven in 1898 and three following years, being captain in 1900 and 1901. During his last three seasons he headed the batting averages, his figures being 33.00, 24.42 and 25.78. He had been wounded in the trenches the month before his death.

2ND LIEUT. JOHN FREDERICK LASCELLES (Rifle Brigade, attached Royal Flying Corps) was killed in France on July 31,aged 19, after having been mentioned in Despatches and receiving the Military Cross. As a fast medium left hand bowler he obtained a place in the Winchester Eleven in 1913 and 1914, taking in the former year fifteen wickets for 21.47 runs each and in the latter twenty-eight at a cost of 24.71 apiece. In 1914 he headed the averages. In his two matches against Eton he was not very successful, his four wickets costing 178 runs.

2ND LIEUT. JAMES LAVELLE (12th Highland Light Infantry) was killed in action on August 20, aged 24. He was in the Stony Hurst Eleven and played for the Drumpellier C.C., of Scotland.

2ND LIEUT. CECIL D. NORTON LAWSON (8th Battalion Royal West Kent Regiment) was killed in action in France on September 26, aged 19. He was in the Haileybury Eleven in 1914, scoring 65 runs in six innings and taking sixteen wickets for 21.06 runs each.

MAJOR BERTRAM HENRY LEATHAM, D. S. O. (19th Yorshire Regiment, temporary Lieut-Col. in command of the 2nd Wiltshire Regiment) was killed in Flanders on September 26, aged 34. He was a keen all-round sportsman and captained his regimental cricket and football elevens.

THE HON. SIR EDWARD CHANDOS LEIGH, K. C. B., K. C., late Counsel to the Speaker, who was born at Stoneleigh Abbey, Warwickshire, on December 22, 1832, died in London on May 18. His death followed very closely on that of his elder son, while his younger son had also earlier in the year met a soldier's death at the front. He was in the Harrow Eleven in 1849 and two following years, being captain in 1851. In his first two seasons he did little in the Public School matches, apart from his long-stopping, which was very good indeed; but in 1851 he scored 8 and 11 v. Winchester, and 42 v. Eton. In the last-mentioned year it was said of him:-- The Captain of the Eleven, and certainly he appeared a most excellent and popular one. His style of batting is awkward, but he is a fine hitter forward and to leg. He played remarkably well in the matches at Lord's. We noticed him last year as one who in the field will let a ball go through him rather than by him, and the same steady determination was evident this year. He was right-handed as a batsman, but fielded left, and was excellent at long-stop. At Oxford he obtained his blue as a Freshman and played against Cambridge in 1852, 1853 and 1854. In the three matches Sir Edward made only 8 runs, but Oxford won each game by an innings. In important cricket his highest score was 62 for M.C.C. v. Gentlemen of Kent at Canterbury in 1861. He was one of the founders of the Oxford Harlequins, and for many years Secretary of I Zingari. Between 1853 and 1856 he assisted Oxfordshire. He joined the M.C.C. in 1852, served on the Committee 1866-69, 1877-79, 1888-91, and was President in 1887. He was brother-in-law of Mr. R. A. FitzGerald and uncle of Mr. H. D. G. Levenson-Gower. He was Recorder of Nottingham from 1881 to 1909 and Counsel to the Speaker from 1883 to 1907.

MR. JOHN LLOYD, born in 1833, died in London on June 8. He was a sound batsman and above the average as a wicket keeper. For some years he was Honorary Secretary of the South Wales C.C., with which the brothers Grace were prominently associated. It was for that Club that W. G. obtained his first great success as a batsman, making 170 and 56 not out against the Gentlemen of Sussex on the old ground at Brighton. In the same match Mr. Lloyd scored 82 and 4 not out and caught one and stumped three. As a memento of the occasion Mr. Lloyd presented W.G. with an appropriately inscribed bat, He was the founder of the Brecknockshire County C.C., and was most keenly interested in the game to the last. He will always be chiefly remembered for the very prominent part he played in obtaining a system of county government for London.

LIEUT. THOMAS LENTHALL, LODER-SYMONDS (2nd Scottish Rifles) who was born in 1892, fell in action in France on May 9. He was in the Lancing Eleven in 1911, when he made 172 runs with an average of 12.28.

THE 9TH MARQUESS OF LONDONDERRY (CHARLES STEWART VANE-TEMPEST-STEWART), G.C.V.O., K.G., P.C., &c., was born in London on July 16, 1852, died on February 8. He was President of the Durham County C.C.

2ND LIEUT. ROBERT LONGBOTTOM (7th King's Royal Riffle Corps) was killed in Flanders on July 30, aged 19. He was a fair all-round cricketer and in the Wellington XI in 1912 and 1913. He was also a member of the College XV.

2ND LIEUT. E. J. LONGTON (Essex Regiment) was reported killed in October in the Dardanelles, having previously been stated to be missing. He was in the Westminster School Eleven in 1914, making 178 runs with an average of 25.42. Against Charterhouse he scored only 9.

LIEUT. ARTHUR CARR GLYNN LONSDALE (6th Battalion King's Royal Rifles, attached to 2nd Battalion Royal Scots Fusiliers) died on March 13 of wounds received two days earlier, aged 23. He was a scholar of Eton and Radley and was in the latter Eleven in 1910, when he was second in the batting averages with 19.25.

2ND LIEUT. FRANCIS WILLIAM LYNCH (Connaught Rangers), was killed in action on April 26, aged 19. He was a useful member of the Pembroke C.C., of Ireland.

CAPT. JOSEPH LYNCH (10th Yorkshire Regiment) killed in France on September 25, aged 25, was in the Dublin University Eleven in 1905. He also gained note as a Rugby footballer and golfer.

MR. WILLIAM VESEY MACHIN, who at one time played for the Notts Gentlemen, died at Scarborough on September 8.

2ND LIEUT. CLAUDE LYSAGHT MACKAY (2nd Worcestershire Regiment) died on June 7, at Boulogne, of wounds received in action on May 28, aged 20. In 1912 and 1913 he was in the Clifton Eleven, in the latter year making 400 runs with an average of 36.33--his highest score was 71 v. Cheltenham--and taking twenty wickets for 15.45 runs each. He was essentially the all-round man of the side, being second in the batting and first in bowling. He had a good reach and would undoubtedly have made a name for himself had he been able to devote himself to first-class cricket. On his only appearance for Gloucestershire--v. Kent at Maidstone in 1914--he scored 13 and 15. He won the Challenge Cup in the Athletic Sports at Clifton and the Public Schools heavy-weight Boxing Competition at Aldershot in 1913.

LIEUT. MAYDO DANIEL MACDONALD (13th Overseas Battalion Canadian Expeditionary Force) who was born at Ripley, Ontario, on August 29, 1885, fell in action on April 23. He was a member of the Rosedale C.C., of Toronto.

MR. DONALD MACLAURIN, who died in Edinburgh on August 22, aged about 40, was a good batsman and a medium-paced bowler with much break. During the three years he was in the Blair Lodge Eleven he did excellent work..

CAPT. BASIL MACLEAR (2nd Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers) was killed on May 26, whilst serving with the Expeditionary Force. In 1897 and 1898 he was in the Bedford Grammar School XI, in the latter year (when the side did not lose a School match) taking most wickets--35--at a cost of 13.91 runs each. He was one of the most famous of Irish International Rugby footballers.

CAPT. JOHN WYNDHAM HAMILTON MCCULLOCH (8th Border Regiment), died on October 21 of wounds received in Flanders the previous day, aged 20. At Westminster he was a double pink, being a prominent member of the football team and a promising cricketer. He was in the Eleven in 1912 and 1913, in the former season making 309 runs with an average of 23.76 and in the latter 413 with one of 34.41. In 1914 he obtained the Pashley Cup for batting. In his two matches v. Charterhouse, he scored 24 and 1, 6 and 86, and v. M.C.C., 18 and 53, the last-mentioned innings being played against the bowling of Walter Mead and Reeves.

CAPT. ANGUS V. MAKANT (5th Loyal North Lancashire Regiment) died on March 14, aged 26, of wounds received in France. He was in the Harrow Eleven in 1907 and 1908, playing each year against Eton, but was lucky to receive his colours. At Cambridge he was not successful in obtaining his blue.

MR. VICTOR M. MANSELL, who died suddenly in London on October 12, aged 43, was a well-known writer on the game, and a member of the Sportsman staff.

SERGT. REGINALD MARKS (10th-106th Winnipeg Light Infantry) was killed in France in June. He was born in London, educated at Taplow Grammar School and King's College (London), and played for the Rangers C.C. and the Young Conservative C.C. of Winnipeg.

2ND LIEUT. FREDERICK ERNEST MARRIOTT (7th Rifle Brigade) was killed on July 30, aged 22. He did not obtain his colours at Uppingham, but was in both the XI and the XV at Brasenose College, Oxford.

CAPT. EDMUND MARSDEN (64th Pioneers, Indian Army) died of malarial fever in Burma in September, aged 34. In 1909, when he averaged 42.09 for the East Gloucestershire C.C., he played in two matches for Gloucestershire, scoring 7 and 11 v. Notts and 38 and 23 v. Northamptonshire, both games taking place at Gloucester. (Owing to an oversight, his initial was given as G. in Wisden for 1910.)

2ND LIEUT. NICHOLAS CLAYTON MARSH (16th, attached 1st, Battalion The King's (Liverpool) Regiment) fell in action in France on September 26, aged 19. He was educated at Birkenhead School, where he was in both the Eleven and Fifteen.

THE REV. CANON JOSEPH WILLIAM MARSHALL, who was born at Cambridge on December 5, 1835, died at Blackheath on September 10. Educated at King Edward VI's School, Birmingham, and Trinity College, Cambridge, he obtained his blue in 1855, playing against Oxford in that and the two following years. In his three matches he obtained 104 runs with an average of 20.80 and took five wickets for 108 runs. In 1836 he made the winning hit, for which he was presented with a ball by the M.C.C. He found himself in very good company whilst at the University, his captains being Reginald Hankey, Joseph M'Cormick, and C. D. Marsham, and others in the Eleven with him Joseph Makinson and R. A. Fitzgerald. He was described as A steady batsman, a fast round-armed bowler, fielding in no place in particular, though generally behind the wicket. In 1857 he was one of the Cambridge Committee which established the Sports, and it was in that year that he won the Silver Racket. He was brother of Mr. J. H. Marshall, of the Cambridge Eleven of 1859.

LIEUT. WILLIAM MARSHALL (8th Durham Light Infantry), a well-known club cricketer in Durham, was killed in action on April 28.

THE REV. CLOUDESLEY DEWAR BULLOCK MARSHAM died at Harrietsham, near Maidstone, of which parish he had been rector for twenty-seven years, on the 2nd of March. Born at Merton College, Oxford, on January 30, 1835, he had completed his 80th year, outliving his famous Cambridge contemporaries Joseph Makinson and Joseph McCormick. Mr. Marsham retired from first-class cricket so long ago that to the present generation he was merely a name, but in his day he was the best amateur bowler in England. Playing all his serious cricket before the alteration of Law X, he bowled--right hand on the fast side of medium pace--with a purely round arm action, but as he stood 6ft. 1in. the ball was delivered from a good height. He was very straight, with great accuracy of length, and came off the pitch with plenty of life. It has been said that he had a quick break from the leg side, but a famous cricketer who remembers him perfectly well says that he did not with intention make the ball turn, such break as he got on now and then being due to the ground. What Mr. Marsham would have done in these days of carefully prepared wickets and the heavy roller it is futile to conjecture. It is sufficient that on the wickets of his own time he was brilliantly effective as long as he remained before the public. He said himself that flexibility of wrist was the chief cause of his success. He played five times for Oxford against Cambridge--1854 to 1858--and even if he had done nothing else his record in the University match would have made him famous. In the Gentlemen and Players' matches he appeared ten times, playing every year at Lord's from 1854 to 1862, but it was never his good fortune to be on the winning side. Still he took forty-eight wickets against the Players for just under 18 runs apiece. In 1860 he had the honour of being chosen captain at Lord's of the first Eleven of England against the Next Fourteen. Mr. Marsham did not play much important cricket after entering the Church, but he took part in a few matches for Bucks between 1864 and 1868. He played for the Zingari and Free Foresters and had been a member of the M.C.C. since 1886. It was under the leadership of his son, C. H. B. Marsham, that Kent won the Championship in 1906

2ND LIEUT. ERIC NEWTON MARSON (9th Warwickshire Regiment), born on December 26, 1895, was killed in the Dardanelles in August. He was in the Eleven both at Aston School and Birmingham University.

MR. RICHARD BRISCOE MASEFIELD, who died at Westward Ho! on January 28, aged 71, played a few times for Cambridge University in 1863 and 1864 but did not obtain his blue. He was in St. John's College Eleven, and was described as A difficult bowler when on the spot.

MR. ERIC STUART MATTHEWS, of the Harrow Eleven of 1890, died in London on March 6. In his match with Eton he scored 5, only A. C. MacLaren (76) and A. H. M. Butler (19) reaching double-figures. Of his cricket that season it was written:-- Early in the year seemed to have lost all form, but came on again suddenly, and proved a very respectable bat: not too brilliant in the field. Subsequently he played for Clare College, Cambridge, but did not obtain his blue. He had been a member of the M.C.C. since 1888.

2ND LIEUT. HAROLD GOSTWYCH MAY (1st Battalion Dorsetshire Regiment) died at Boulogne on March 27 of wounds received on March 14, aged 26. A good batsman and excellent wicket-keeper, he was in the Sherborne Eleven four years, 1904 to 1907, being captain in the last season. His batting whilst at School showed a continued advance, his averages being 9.57, 17.50, 23.11, and 30,69, the last-mentioned being the best of the year for the side.

2ND LIEUT. CHRISTOPHER MEAD (4th, attached 2nd, Battalion East Surrey Regiment) was killed in France on September 28, aged 27. He was educated at Charterhouse, where he was in the Eleven in 1906, scoring 196 runs with an average of 24.50, and taking four wickets at a cost of 21.25 runs each. He also gained his colours for football. In July he had been wounded, but returned to duty.

ARTHUR MIHELL, a well known umpire in Association matches in New South Wales, died in Sydney, in July, aged 52.

CAPT. J. M. MITCHELL (7th Battalion Royal Scots) was killed in the great railway accident at Gretna Junction on May 22. He was one of the best-known cricketers in the Edinburgh district, and had played for Blair Lodge and captained the Royal High School. He was a good batsman, and had served in the Army for twelve years.

LIEUT. HENRY STUART MOBERLY (74th, attached 69th, Punjabis) was killed in action in France on September 26, aged 28. At Bedford Grammar School he obtained his colours for cricket, football, and swimming. He was in the School XI in 1905 and 1906, in the latter year taking fifty seven wickets for 14.94 runs each.

LIEUT. ARCHIBALD GIFFORD MOIR (7th Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders) born on March 25, 1890, was killed near Ypres on April 25. He was a sound batsman, and scored well for Fettes and Clackmannan County. For the former he averaged 33 in 1910, 46.14 in 1911, and 38.50 in 1912. When he headed both sets of averages, his bowling showing ten wickets for 11.70 runs each. For Clackmannan in 1913 he averaged 22.70, his highest score being 122 not out v. Fettes.

CAPT. GEORGE KING MOLINEUX (2nd Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers), born on April 15, 1887, was stated to have fallen in France about the beginning of June, having previously been officially reported missing. He was in the Winchester Eleven of 1906, when he scored 343 runs with an average of 26.38, and took thirty-nine wickets for 24.25 runs each. Against Eton he played an innings of 35 and took five wickets for 157. That season he and J. Leslie were the best all-round men in the side. He was elected a member of the M.C.C. in 1912.

MR. FRANCIS GEORGE MONKLAND, born at Trichinopoly on October 8, 1841, died in London on January 15. As a batsman he was a good hitter, while in the field he excelled at long-stop and mid-on. He was educated at Repton, where he was in the Eleven in 1872 and 1873, during which season the scored 403 runs for the School with an average of 21, and took forty-six wickets. His first appearance for Gloucestershire was in 1874, and three years later he was chosen for the Gentlemen v. Players match at Prince's. In first-class cricket his highest score was 59 against Surrey at Clifton in 1875. By profession he was a solicitor.

MR. F. E. MORGAN, who died at Cambridge on September 21, played cricket occasionally for Cambridgeshire early in the century. He was for a time secretary of the Cambridgeshire Cricket Association, and at the time of his death a vice-president.

CAPT. GUY MORGAN (Royal Welsh Fusiliers) who was killed in France on September 27, aged 20, after having been wounded twice, was not in the Eleven whilst at Winchester, but played for Christ Church, Oxford.

2ND LIEUT. STEPHEN BEVERLEY MORGAN (2nd Leicestershire Regiment), who was killed on May 14, aged 17, was in the Clifton Eleven in 1913 and 1914. He was a most promising all-round cricketer, and in 1914 had headed the College bowling with sixty-six wickets for 9.92 runs each, and was third in batting with 23.79. As a bowler, he was left-hand medium paced and whipped back quickly.

LIEUT. EDMUND MORTIMER (6th Northumberland Fusiliers) was killed in action on April 25. He was a poor bat, but had appeared occasionally in the Northumberland Eleven. He was brother of Mr. W. B. Mortimer, mentioned below.

LIEUT. WILLIAM BRIAN MORTIMER (4th Battalion Durham Light Infantry) was killed in action on June 15, aged 39. He was educated at the Royal Lancaster Grammar School, where he was in the Eleven. Like his brothers, he had also been associated with the Lancaster C.C.

2ND LIEUT. BASIL MUIR (6th Worcestershire Regiment, attached 3rd Battalion) was killed in action in Flanders on June 16, aged 19. He was in the Malvern Eleven in 1914, when he made 59 runs with an average of 7.38 and took forty wickets for 17.43 runs each. He was a right-hand medium-paced bowler of much promise.

LIEUT. GUY GREVILLE NAPIER (35th Sikhs) born on the 26th of January, 1884, died in France on September 25, of wounds received earlier that day. Mr. Napier will live in cricket history as one of the best medium pace bowlers seen in the University match in his own generation. Playing four times for Cambridge--1904 to 1907--he took thirty-one wickets for 544 runs. Considering the excellent condition of the ground in the first three of these matches his figures will bear comparison with the finest records of old days when scores were far smaller than they are now. He was nearly always seen to great advantage at Lord's, the slope of the ground no doubt helping him. At Lord's for the Gentlemen in 1907 he took six wickets for 39 runs in the Players' second innings, this, having regard to the class of the batsmen opposed to him, being the best performance of his life. It is scarcely an exaggeration to say that he did not bowl a bad ball in the innings. He fully retained his skill after his Cambridge days were over. When home from India, where he held a Government appointment at Quetta, he bowled with marked success for the M.C.C. against Yorkshire at Scarborough in 1913 taking eight Yorkshire wickets in one innings for 44 runs. Bowling with a fairly high and very easy action he had great command of length and made the ball go with his arm. Quick off the ground he nearly always looked hard to play. He was in the Marlborough eleven for three years-- 1899, 1900 and 1901--taking nine wickets in his last match against Rugby. For Cambridge in first-class matches he took sixty-seven wickets in 1904, sixty-four in 1905, seventy-seven in 1906, and seventy-five in 1907. He was thus consistently successful for four seasons, but most of his best work was done at Lord's. In 1904 he played for the Gentlemen for the first time and made his first appearance for Middlesex. He was on the winning side three times, the match in 1904 being drawn. In 1905 he helped A. F. Morcom to get Oxford out in the last innings for 123, Cambridge gaining a sensational victory by 40 runs.

LIEUT. ROWLAND E. NAYLOR (1st Royal Welsh Fusiliers) fell in action on May 17, aged 21, having previously been wounded in October. He was the Eton wicket-keeper in 1912 and 1913, being also a useful batsman. In his two matches v. Harrow he scored 27 and 26 and made seven catches. He also played for Montgomeryshire. He was born on April 25, 1894.

LIEUT. COL. GEORGE HENRY NEALE (3rd Middlesex Regt.), born at Reigate on January 31, 1869, was killed in France on September 28. He was an excellent batsman with strong back play and a very good off-drive. In 1886 and 1887 he was in the Lancing Eleven, averaging 14.50 in the previous year and 25.50 in the latter. Subsequently he played much Army cricket and in India especially made many large scores. At Peshawar in January, 1903, he made 55 and 124 not out for Peshawar v. Oxford University Authentics, in the second innings going in first and carrying out his bat, and on the same ground a month later contributed 267 to the total of 607 scored by Queen's Regiment v. Gordon Highlanders. Since 1902 he had been a member of the M.C.C.

LIEUT. H. G. NEVILE (2nd South Wales Borderers), after having been wounded twice, was killed in action in the Dardanelles in September. He played occasionally for Lincolnshire. Whilst at Cambridge he obtained his blue for golf.

LIEUT. CHARLES NEAL NEWCOMBE (7th Batt. King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry) fell in action in December, aged 24. He was a useful left-handed slow-to-medium bowler, who made the ball swing, and in 1910 played for Derbyshire v. Yorkshire at Chesterfield.

MAJOR GEORGE POPE NEWSTEAD (1st Battalion Suffolk Regiment, temporary Lieut-Col. Sierra Leone Battalion of the West African Frontier Force) died of wounds on March 4, at Paro, Cameroon, aged 39. He was in the Rugby School Eleven in 1894, when he scored 138 runs with an average of 9.87. His play that season, apart from one innings of 54 not out, was very disappointing, but he was a very fine out-field. He saw service in the South African War, receiving the Queen's medal with three clasps and the King's with two.

SUB.-LIEUT. JOHN NORMAN (Howe Battalion, Mediterranean Expeditionary Force) was killed in the Dardanelles on June 7, aged 22. A very useful all-round cricketer, he was in the St. Paul's Eleven in 1909 and two following years. In 1909 and 1910 he was second in bowling, and in his last season third in batting (317 runs with an average of 22.64) and first in bowling (sixty wickets at a cost of 14.87 runs each). He threw the hammer for Cambridge against Oxford in 1913 and 1914.

SIR CHARLES WILLIAM ATHOLL OAKELEY, 4th Bart., who was born at Ealing on October 25, 1828, died at Tunbridge Wells on November 2. He was not in the Eleven either at Eton or Oxford but was a life-long lover of the game and a very useful performer. Whilst in India--he was formerly Captain in the Bengal Cavalry--he made several centuries, and in 1867 scored 151 for Cranbrook v. Tenterden. In 1876 he was elected President of the Kent County C.C., and for many years was a member of the Committee. Since 1857 he had been a member of the M.C.C. Among his most cherished possessions was a bat bearing the following inscription:-- Presented to Sir Charles Oakeley, Bart, in recognition of his generous patronage of cricket, by members and friends of the Frittenden Cricket Club, 1887. He was a great friend of Mr. Roger Kynaston, a former Hon. Secretary and Treasurer of the M.C.C., and in May, 1879, presented the Club with his original bat.

2ND LIEUT. D. MCK. M. O'CALLAGHAN (Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry) was killed at St. Eloi on March 14, aged 25. He was in the Cheltenham Eleven in 1909, scoring 213 runs with an average of 21.30, and being the best bowler on the side: he took twenty-seven wickets for 19.48 runs each. Against Haileybury he did little, but in the second innings of the Marlborough match he played a rousing second innings of 66. In the first innings of the Oxford Freshman's match of 1910 he took three wickets for 24 runs, but he did not obtain his blue.

MR. LYNDHURST OGDEN, born at Kirby Douglas, Isle of Man, on March 12, 1847, died at Toronto on April 26. He was educated at Charterhouse, where he was in the Eleven in 1863 and 1864. In the former year he played little, owing to a accident at football, but in the latter he fielded brilliantly at point and occasionally bowled his peculiar break-backs with success. In 1865 he assisted the Liverpool C.C. and, leaving England in 1869, played in Chili and Pera until 1876, when he settled in Toronto. He was Secretary treasurer of the Toronto C.C. until 1894, and at one time captain of the Club.

MR. WILLIAM EDWARD OPENSHAW, of the Lancashire County C.C., died on February 15. In 1869 and 1870 he was in the Harrow Eleven, being described as A very neat and careful bat, and frequently makes good scores: is also a good field, especially at cover-point. In his two matches with Eton he scored 45 runs with an average of 11.25 and took two wickets--Mr. G. H. Longman's was one of them--for 24 runs. Between 1879 and 1882 he appeared a few times, but without much success, for Lancashire, and he also played for the Gentlemen of Cheshire. In 1869 he was in the Harrow Football XI, and ten years later represented England v. Ireland at Rugby.

MR. JOHN ARTHUR ORNSBY died at Durham on March 28, aged 64. He was in the Doncaster Grammar School XI in 1867 and two following years, being captain in 1869, when he headed the batting averages. He was also a very good long-stop. In 1870 he won the long jump for Oxford in the University Sports, covering 20ft, 3¾ ins., and rowed twice in the Boat Race--in 1872 and 1873, the latter being the first year in which sliding seats were used.

CAPT. ARTHUR ROXBURGHE ORR (2nd Scots Guards) was killed in action in France in October, aged 30. He was educated at Loretto, and played for Household Brigade and Stirling County, being a free-hitting batsman. In 1914 he had been wounded at Ypres.

LIEUT.-COL. CECIL HOWARD PALMER (9th Royal Warwickshire Regiment) who was born in July, 1873, was killed in Dardanelles on July 26. He was fourth in the Radley College averages in 1890 and third in 1891. In 1899 he made his first appearance for Hampshire, his chief success for the County that year being an innings of 64 v. Yorkshire, at Bradford. Four seasons later--in June, 1903--when assisting the Gentleman of Worcestershire v. Gentleman of Warwickshire, on the Edgbaston ground, he made 102 in his first innings and 127 not out in his second. In July, 1904, he scored 41 and 75 not out for Worcestershire v. Oxford University, at Worcester, and later in the same season played in the three matches for Hampshire, in that with Somerset at Taunton, making 37 and 49. He served in the South African War, being mentioned in Despatches and receiving the Queen's medal with four clasps.

LIEUT. J. A. PARKE (10th Durham Light Infantry, attached 9th Rifle Brigade), who was killed in France on September 28, was in the Winchester XI in 1910 and 1911. He averaged 10.69 in the former year and 26.76 in the latter, when he was unfortunate enough to obtain spectacles v. Eton.

CAPT. WILLIAM MACKWORTH PARKER (Adjutant 8th Rifle Brigade) who was born on the 1st of September, 1886, was killed in action in Flanders on July 30. In 1903 and two following seasons he was in the Winchester Eleven, averaging 25.77 in 1904 and 28.91 in 1905. Against Eton he was not seen at his best, making only 48 runs in five innings. In 1906 he was in the Sandurst XI, and subsequently he played frequently in Army cricket and for the Green Jackets and Free Foresters. Since 1912 he had been a member of the M.C.C. At Frensham Hill in August, 1909, he scored 106 and 103 for Bordon Camp v. C. E. N. Charrington's XI. In 1914 he played at Lord's in the Centenary Week, for Army v. Navy, making 5 and 10 and taking four wickets for 81 runs.

MAJOR WALTER HERBERT PATERSON (1st Battalion East Surrey Regiment) fell in action in April, aged 45. He was a very useful cricketer, and had played in the Farnham Grammar School XI. He served in the South African War, receiving the Queen's medal with two clasps.

2ND LIEUT. JAMES LEY PATON (3rd Black Watch, attached 1st Battalion), born in December, 1892, was killed in front of the German trenches on October 13. He captained the St. Andrew's University Eleven, and was also a member of the XV and of the golf teams. He played occasionally for Perthshire.

MR. THOMAS MAIN PATTERSON, born at Huyton, near Liverpool, October 17, 1857, died at Littlebourne, near Canterbury, on March 31. He was a younger brother of Mr. W. S. Patterson and was in the Uppingham Eleven of 1875, when he scored 284 runs with an averaged 31.55, his highest innings being 165 v. Repton. He was then described as Good bat, but rather uncertain: hits very hard past cover-point, and is very good to slows; punishes loose bowling of any sort; fast bowler, and field and catch.

MR. JACOB LUARD PATTISSON, who died at Savernake on September 18, aged 74, was one of the founders and first Secretary of the Civil Service C.C.

CAPT. BERTRAM PAWLE (8th Rifle Brigade) was killed in Flanders at the end of July, aged 23. He was in the Haileybury Eleven in 1908 and three following years, being captain in 1911. In 1908 he was second both in batting and bowling and in 1909 first in bowling. In 1910 he scored 62 v. Haverford, and in his last season 25 and 39 not out v. Wellington. At Oxford he played for the Freshman in 1912, and for the Seniors the two following years, making 64 not out and 0 in 1913, and 26 and 47 in 1914.

PRIVATE JAMES PEARSON (9th Royal Scots Highlanders), who was killed near Ypres in May, aged 27, was in the XI and XV at Watson's College. He was a good, free hitter, had made many hundreds, and was very keen in the field. He was an International footballer.

CAPT. ERIC FRANK PENN (4th Grenadier Guards), born in London on April 17, 1878, was killed in action in France on October 18. As a member of the Eton Eleven of 1897 he scored 195 runs with an average of 15.00 and took twelve wickets for 18.08 runs each. Against Harrow he made 0 and 22 and obtained two wickets in the first innings for 46 runs. In 1899 and 1902 he played for Cambridge against Oxford, scoring 43 runs in his three innings and taking one wicket at a cost of 113 runs. In 1902 he played a not-out innings of 51 v. All Ireland on the Cambridge ground. He visited America in 1898 as a member of Mr. P. F. Warner's team, and the same year was elected a member of the M.C.C. Owing to service in the South African War, he did not play in first-class cricket in 1900 and 1901. His name will be found in Norfolk matches, commencing in 1899. He was the eldest son of Mr. William Penn, and nephew of Messrs. Frank and Alfred Penn, and of Messrs, Frederick, Lennard and Graham Strokes, all of the whom have played for Kent.

2ND LIEUT. RODOLPH ALGERNON PERSSE (Rifle Brigade, attached 2nd 60th Rifles) who fell in action on January the 1st, was in the Eton XI of 1911. Against Winchester he took five wickets for 42 runs, and v. Harrow four for 73. In the Freshman's match at Oxford in 1913 he obtained four for 56. He was 22 years of age.

THE REV. CANON ERNEST E. M. PHAIR, born at Fort Alexander in 1870, was educated in the loss of the Lusitania on May 7th. He was a member of the St. John's C.C., of Winnipeg.

THE REV. THOMAS DOWELL PHILLIPPS, born at Bristol on April 16, 1833, died at Oakland, California, on January 6. He was a very strongly defensive batsman, cutting and hitting to leg well, and a remarkably quick and active field. In succession he played for Upper Canada College (Toronto), Trinity College and Canada, and in the Halifax Tournament of 1874 scored 197 runs with an average of 39.40, obtaining a cup for making the largest aggregate and a couple of bats for obtaining two scores of over 50. He appeared for Canada v. United States in 1858, 1859, 1860 and 1879, and in 1880 captained the Canadian team during their ill-advised tour in England. In the match v. Surrey Club and Ground, at the Oval, he scored 12 and 50. In 1858, 1876, and 1877 he published a Canadian Cricket Guide, and he was interested in the game to the end. It was at the age of 63 that he made the highest score of his career--100 not out for Chicago 2nd XI v. St. George's 2nd XI, in 1896.

LIEUT. EDWARD STONE PHILLIPPS (1st Monmouthshire Regiment) born at Newport (Mon) on January 18, 1883, was killed in action in Flanders in the second week of May. For three years he was in the Marlborough Eleven. His great triumph at the College was to score 61 and 141 v. M.C.C. and Ground in July, 1900. In his matches against Rugby he made 64 runs in five innings. In 1904 he obtained his blue for Cambridge, scoring 9 and 12 v. Oxford. Since 1901 he had rendered excellent service to Monmouthshire, and, in making 133 not out v. Glamorganshire at Cardiff in 1905, put on 284 for the second wicket with Silverlock (155 not out) without a separation being effected. He had been a member of the M.C.C. since 1908, and was an amateur ex-champion of golf for England.

LIEUT. HERBERT HENRY PHILLIPS (3rd Leicestershire Regiment), who died in hospital at Merville on October 4 of wound received in action, aged 22, had been captain of cricket and football at Hertford Grammar School.

CAPT. LESLIE PHILLIPS (1st Welsh Regiment), brother of Mr. E. S. Phillips, was killed in Flanders on May 24, aged 28. He played occasionally for Monmouthshire, but was not in the Eleven whilst at Marlborough.

LIEUT. ROGER THOMPSON POLLARD (5th Royal Berkshire Regiment), born on May 25, 1891, was killed on October 13 whilst leading a bombing attack. Whilst at St. Paul's School he was in the Eleven in 1908 and two following years, being a useful all-round player. His best season was that of 1910, during which he scored 177 runs with an average of 11.06 and headed the bowling by taking twenty wickets for 14.80 runs each. At Oxford he was in his College (Merton) Eleven, but did not obtain his blue. He was in the Rugby XV both at St. Paul's and Merton.

2ND LIEUT. J. S. POOLE (4th King's Royal Rifle Corps) was killed in action in the second week of May, aged 19. He was brilliant in the field and a good slow left-hand bowler. In 1913 and 1914 he was in the Rugby Eleven, and was captain-elect for last year. In 1913 he had a batting average of 22.72 and took thirty-one wickets for 20.35 runs each: in 1914 he averaged 13.44 with the bat and obtained seventeen wickets at a cost of 23.82 apiece. On his only appearance--in 1913--against Marlborough he played an innings of 35 and took one wicket.

LIEUT. REGINALD THOMAS BUCKINGHAM POPE (1st Battalion Welsh Regiment) was killed in action near Ypres on February 16, aged 23. As a member of the Bradfield College Eleven of 1910, he was second in the averages with 33.00, his highest score being 106.

PRIVATE THOMAS CHRISTOPHER PORTER (6th Battalion Manchester Regiment) was killed in the Dardanelles in June, aged 29. He made many good scores for the old Manchester Broughton C.C., and twice headed the averages, in 1905 (when he played for Lancashire 2nd XI) his figures being 11--0--115*--642--58.36. He was well-known as an Association footballer.

LIEUT. RONALD WILLIAM POULTON-PALMER(4th Royal Berkshire Regiment) was killed in the trenches on May 5, aged 25. In 1907 and 1908 he was in the Rugby Eleven, in each year being third in the batting averages, in the former with 18.87 and in the latter with 27. 96. In his matches v. Marlborough he made 51 runs in three innings. He was a splendid field. As a three-quarter he had played Rugby football for Oxford University and England.

2ND LIEUT. LEONARD MAURICE POWELL (1st Battalion Gordon Highlanders) fell in action on June 18, aged 20. In 1911 and two following years he was in the Loretto Eleven, in 1913 making 460 runs with an average of 27.05 and taking twenty-three wickets for 9.91 runs each. In 1914 he appeared in the Freshmen's match at Cambridge, scoring 22 and 5, and also made 76 runs in eight innings for Kent 2nd XI.

2ND LIEUT. ROWLAND RAW (9th Lancashire Fusiliers) was killed in action in the Dardanelles on August 7, aged 31. He was in the Clifton College Eleven in 1901 and 1902, averaging 22.00 in the former year and 20.71 in the latter. He did not obtain his blue at Cambridge.

LIEUT. LIONEL HENRY YORKE POWNALL (1st Battalion Royal West Kent Regiment) was killed in action on March 21, aged 19. He was in the Clifton College Eleven of 1913, when he scored 57 runs with an average of 6.33.

LIEUT. HENRY BERTHAM PRICE (London Rifle Brigade), born at Montmorency Falls on February 25, 1891, was killed in action at Ypres in June. He was an useful all-round player for the Quebec C.C. He had been mentioned in Despatches.

MR. JOHN GRIMSHAW PRIZEMAN, who died in Manchester on December 20, aged 47, was founder of the Central Lancashire Cricket League and honorary secretary during the twenty-four years of its existence.

MR. ROBERT WILLIAM RAPER, B.C.L. Senior Fellow, Vice-President and Bursar of Trinity College, Oxford, was born in Monmouthshire on March 9, 1842, and died at his College on July 15. Although not in the Eleven whilst at Cheltenham, he was in his younger days an accomplished player. Since 1884 he had been a member of the M.C.C.

LIEUT. DOUGLAS RAWES (8th Battalion King's Royal Rifle Corps) died in London on August 16 of wounds received in Flanders on June 26, aged 34. He gained his colours at Dover College at the age of 16, and afterwards kept up the game in Lisbon.

LIEUT. HARRY NOEL LESLIE RENTON (9th King's Royal Rifle Corps) who was born in Ceylon was killed in action on July 31, aged 20. He was the wicket-keeper of the Harrow Eleven in 1914, and in the match with Eton played a very useful not-out innings of 28.

FREDERICK REGINALD REYNOLDS, born at Bottisham, Cambridgeshire, on August 7, 1834, died at Chorlton-cum-Hardy on April 18, aged 80. Scores and Biographies said of him:--As a batsman he does not excel, hitting at everything with but small defence. He, is however, a superior fast and straight round-armed bowler, with a break-back from the off, and with an easy delivery. In his later years he took to lobs. After filling various engagements he played in turn for the United and All England Eleven, as well as for Cambridgeshire and Lancashire. In 1861 he went to Manchester, and for 48 years was manager of the Old Trafford ground, retiring in December, 1908, with a pension of £100 a year. In 1870 the match at Manchester between Lancashire and Surrey was played for his benefit, but the financial result was disappointing, the game lasting only ten hours. On his occasional appearances for Lancashire between 1865 and 1874 he scored 304 runs with an average of 6.75 and took ninety-four wickets at a cost of 19.21 runs each. Playing for the A.E.E. v. XXII Gentlemen of Sussex at Brighton in 1859, he took nine wickets for 40 runs in the first innings and six for 15 in the second: for United E.E. v. XV of M.C.C. and Ground at Lord's in 1863, eight for 49 second innings and fifteen for 126 in the match, he and Grundy bowling unchanged throughout, which latter feat he and Tarrant performed for Cambridgeshire v. Yorkshire at Bradford in 1866: and four for 12 for Lancashire v. Yorkshire at Sheffield in 1871. For the All England Elevens in 1859 he took 190 wickets for less than 3½ runs each.

2ND LIEUT. NORRIS RIPPON (1st Batt. 5th Duke of Wellington's) who was killed by a sniper on November 18, aged 23, was educated at Giggleswick, where he was in the Elevens.

MR. HENRY MIDDLETON ROGERS, born in 1840, died at Tunbridge Wells on November 16. He was in the Harrow XI of 1859 when it was said of him:-- A good change bowler, a hard hitter, and became by careful practice a good bat. Not very effective in the field. In his match against Eton he scored 18 and took two wickets for 21 runs. He did not obtain his blue at Oxford.

2ND LIEUT. FRANCIS WATSON ROBARTS (1st Battalion 14th London Regiment, London Scottish) fell in action in France on October 13, aged 33. He was well-known as a batsman in Metropolitan club cricket, especially for the Norwood C.C. and the Wanderers.

LIEUT.-COL. CHARLES LAWSON ROBINSON (1st Battalion Monmouthshire Regiment) was killed in action in the first week of May. He had been a member of the Eleven and Fifteen at Durham School.

2ND LIEUT. A. J. H. ROE (7th King's Royal Rifles), who was killed in action in August, aged 24, was in the Merchant Taylors School Eleven in 1908 and two following years. In his last season his batting average was 29.50, for ten innings, his highest score being 105 v. St. John School, Leatherhead. He was not in the Eleven at Oxford, but only just missed obtaining his blue for Rugby.

CAPT. J. MCB. RONALD (The Buffs), killed in April on his 39th birthday, north of Ypres, was well-known in Canterbury with the Old Stagers. He served in the South African War, in which he was wounded.

2ND LIEUT. CURITT NOEL RUNDLE (2nd South Wales Borderers, attached to 5th Royal Scots) fell in action in the Dardanelles in June, aged 19. He was captain of the cricket and football Elevens at Victoria College, Jersey.

SIR WILLIAM RUSSELL, 3rd Bart., born on September 28, 1865, died suddenly at Onibury, Shropshire, on November 25. He was educated at Fettes, where he was in the Eleven in 1882 and 1883. In the former year he headed the bowling averages by taking fifty-four wickets for 7.72 runs each: in 1883 no averages were kept as, owing to an outbreak of diphtheria, the school migrated for a month to Windermere. Of his play in 1883, however, it was said: Has not been quite as successful in bowling as last year, but has nevertheless done good service: has a good break from leg: should learn to vary his pace with an occasional fast one: as a bat has improved much of late.........the most active field: a good short slip. From January, 1896, to December, 1905, he was Hon. Secretary of the Incogniti C.C., of which club he was a life member. He had been a member of the M.C.C. since 1897.

CAPT. JAMES H. A. RYAN (1st Liverpool Regiment) was killed in France France on September 25, aged 23. He was not in the Eleven whilst at Wellingborough Grammar School, but played once or twice for Northamptonshire in 1913 and 1914, in the latter year making 41 v. Somerset on the Northampton ground. He appeared also for Sandhurst and Aldershot Command, his right-hand fast bowling proving very useful. He had received the Military Cross and been mentioned in Despatches.

MR. THOMAS SADLER, who died at Chiddingfold on September 26, aged 80, was about sixty years ago a well-known all-round cricketer in West Surrey. He had declined an invitation to play for Surrey. He was the founder of the Chiddingfold Hunt.

CAPT. GEORGE AMELIUS CRAWSHAY SANDEMAN (3rd Battalion Hampshire Regiment) was born in 1883, and was killed in Flanders on April 26. As a left-handed bowler he obtained a place in the Eton XI in 1901 and 1902, in the latter year (when he headed the averages) taking all ten wickets for 22 runs in the first innings of Winchester and sixteen for 46 in the match: bowling against the wind, he made the ball swerve and was almost unplayable. That season his thirty-five wickets for Eton cost 11.62 runs each. At Oxford he was chosen for the Freshmen's match, but did not obtain his blue. He played for the Eton Ramblers and Free Foresters, and had been a member of the M.C.C. since 1904. He was Squire of Fonab, Perthshire.

LIEUT. HAROLD SCOTT SANDERSON (8th Battalion Black Watch) was killed in France on September 26, aged 22. At Charterhouse he represented the school at cricket, football, and fives, and won the Rackets Cup. He was in the Eleven in 1910 and 1911, in the latter year (when he scored 69 v. Wellington) being second in the averages with 32.83. From 1912 to 1914 he batted well for the Grange C.C. of Edinburgh.

2ND LIEUT. WILFRID PAUL SCHOLES (1st Battalion 4th Leicestershire Regiment) was killed in action in France October 11 and 13, aged 20. He was educated at Wyggeston Grammar School, Leicester, where he was for two years captain of the cricket eleven and Victor Ludorum at the sports, 1913.

LIEUT. CHARLES HARRY NORMAN SCHOLEY (Rifle Brigade) was killed in France on September 26, aged 23. He was not in the Eleven whilst at Uppingham, but played for Clare College, Cambridge, at cricket, hockey, and Rugby football.

LIEUT. J. HARTLEY SCHUTE (6th Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers), previously reported missing, was officially stated in September to have been killed in the Dardanelles. He was a well-known Irish cricketer and footballer.

CAPT. ALISTER WILL HENDERSON SCOTT (2nd Worcestershire Regiment) was born at Pietermaritzburg, and died on May 17 of wounds received near Ypres, aged 24. He was in the Malvern Eleven in 1909 and 1910, being contemporary with D. J. Knight, J. H. and F. C. G. Naumann and A. C. P. Arnold. He was a very useful all-round cricketer, and it is a curious fact that he headed the bowling with 22.08 in 1909 and was last with 19.21 in 1910. For three seasons he was in the Malvern football eleven.

TOM SELLARS, one of the best-known Scottish professionals, died on September 13, aged 70. He was born at Nottingham, and went to Scotland, as professional to the Grange C.C., in 1869, on the recommendation of Richard Daft. He was then described as A good practice bowler for any club and fair bat. He will be best remembered for his association with Edinburgh Academy, where he went in 1875 and remained until 1899, completing a quarter of a century's work there. In 1873 and 1874 he was at Fettes, and from 1891 to 1912 was groundman to the Grange C.C. Perhaps the best innings of his career was one of 71 for Players v. Gentlemen of Scotland, at Raeburn Place in 1883.

CAPT. GEOFFREY BARNSLEY SIMPSON (7th York and Lancaster Regiment), who died of wounds in November, was captain of the Harrogate XI in 1913 and 1914.

ALFRED FARRER SMITH, who was born at Birstall on March 7, 1847, died at Ossett in January. Between 1868 and 1874 he played in 29 matches for Yorkshire, making 692 runs with an average of 14.72, his highest score being 89 v. Notts, at Huddersfield in 1873. A year later he made 99 for Players of North v. Gentlemen of South at Prince's. He was described as A fine batsman, having excellent defence, with plenty of hit......Is also a good field at cover-point and can bowl fast round-armed. Owing to business reasons he retired from first-class cricket at the age of 27, but afterwards was nominated a county umpire.

2ND LIEUT. P. S. SNELL (6th Royal Irish Fusiliers), who was killed in the Dardanelles in August, aged 22. He was educated at Campbell College, Belfast, where he was in the Eleven.

MAJOR ALFRED SOAMES D.S.O., (6th East Kent Regiment), who was killed in Franch on October 13, aged 53, was well-known in cricket circles in Johannesburg, especially as an umpire on the Wanderers' ground.

MR. VERNON JOHN SOUTER died at Elsternwick, Victoria, on July 17, aged 21. He was a very promising left-hand batsman and right-hand medium-paced bowler with a high delivery, who had played for Elsternwick in the sub-District Association and the St. Kilda C.C. In 1913-14 and 1914-15 he had been tried in the Victorian Eleven, in the former season making 55 v. Tasmania at Hobart, and in the latter 57 v. Queensland at Brisbane.

LIEUT. GERALD CAMERON SOUTHERN (53rd Sikhs, Frontier Force) was born in March, 1892, and died in July of wounds received in the Dardanelles. In 1909 and two following seasons he was in the Clifton Colleage Eleven, being captain in 1911, when he scored 102 and 47 in the match with Malvern and averaged 23.15. He was an excellent fieldsman and in 1910 had captained the Rugby XV.

MR. ALBERT GOODWILL SPALDING, born at Byron, Illinois, on September 2, 1850, died at Point Loma, California, on September 9. A famous base-baller, he brought a team to England in 1874 which played seven cricket matches, winning four and drawing three. In the early eighties he was a member of the Chicago C.C. Eleven. He was the head of a well-known American sporting outfitter's firm bearing his name.

MR. CYRIL ANDREW SPOTTISWOODE, who died in London on January 7, aged 47, was a familiar figure at the Canterbury Week, where he took part in the performances of the Old Stagers. He was younger brother of Mr. W. Hugh Spottiswoode.

MR. WILLIAM HUGH SPOTTISWOODE, born in London on July 12, 1864. died suddenly of heart failure at Llandrindod Wells on August 20. He was not in the Eleven whilst at Eton, but was a good batsman and captained the Balliol team at Oxford. He played for Kent three times in 1890, his highest score being 37 against Yorkshire. At times his lobs were very successful.

LIEUT. ALEXANDER POPHAM SPURWAY, R.N. (H.M.S. Achilles) died of illness on November 29, aged 24. He was in the Eleven both at Osborne and Dartmouth.

FREDERICK STEELE, born in London on May 14,1847, died on January 22, in his sixty-eighth year. He was no batsman, but useful as a left-handed fast bowler. He played for Middlesex between 1877 and 1879, taking thirty-four wickets for 18.09 runs each. Among his analyses for the County were three for 10 v. Yorkshire at Lord's in 1877, five for 22 v. Gloucestershire at Lord's in 1879, eight for 93 v. Oxford University at Lord's in 1879, and four for 28 v. Surrey at the Oval in 1879.

2ND LIEUT. JOHN LOCKHART STERLING (3rd, attached 2nd, Royal Scots Fusiliers) fell in action in France on September 26, aged 20. He played cricket at Sedbergh and Glasgow Academy.

2ND LIEUT. PAUL WILLIAM JOHN STEVENSON (23rd London Regiment) fell in Flanders in May, aged 20. He was in the Christ's Hospital Eleven of 1913, making 129 runs with an average of 14.33 and taking fifteen wickets for 12.87 runs each.

LIEUT. JAMES ALEXANDER LOCAN STEWART (1st Rifle Brigade) was reported missing on May 13, and killed--at Shelltrap Farm, Weiltje--in August, his death being announced by the German Red Cross. He was 22 years of age, and had played for Winchester in 1911, when he took thirty-eight wickets for 23.65 runs each: against Eton his analyses were two for 42 and three for 68.

LIEUT. RICHARD KELLOCK STIRLING (5th, attached 1st, Royal Fusiliers) was killed in Flanders on August 21, aged 22. He was educated at Exeter School and Exeter College, Oxford, and played in his College Eleven.

2ND LIEUT. A. W. S. STOCKDALE (7th Durham Light Infantry), previously reported missing, was officially reported in June to have been killed in action. He was a member of the Sunderland Eleven.

LIEUT. W. E. STOCKDALE (Sherwood Rangers Yeomanry), killed in the Dardanelles in September, was a well-know cricketer and hockey-player in the Retford district.

2ND LIEUT. R. A. STUART (7th Cameron Highlanders), who was killed in action in the last week of September, was the fast bowler of Watson's College Eleven in 1911.

MR. HENRY BOYD SUTHERLAND, late Captain in the King's Own Royal Lancaster Regiment, died at St. Leonard's-on-Sea on August 27, aged 71. He was in the Eton XI in 1861 and two following years, and in 1863 it was said of him:-- A very steady and excellent bowler. Uncertain as a bat, being rather fond of THE hit. Takes point well. In his six Public School matches--v. Harrow and Winchester--he made 68 runs in ten innings and took twenty-one wickets. Against Winchester in 1861 his analyses were six for 19 and three for 12. In 1871 he played in one match for Kent. His elder brother, Mr. C. L. Sutherland, appeared for Eton in 1855, 1856, and 1858.

CAPT. THOMAS FRNCIS SWINFORD, late in H. M.'s 98th Regiment (North Staffordshire), born at Margate on May 9, 1839, died at Eastbourne on January 23. He was educated at Black-heath Proprietory School, and played for Kent four times in 1874, scoring 89 runs with an average of 11.12, his highest innings being 50 v. Lancashire at Manchester. He was a good batsman and long-stop.

MR. THOMAS SWINYARD, who died at New York on February 25, aged 82, had been a well-known all-round Canadian cricketer. In 1872 he played with success against Mr. R. A. Fitzgerald's team, at Toronto scoring 29 not out and taking four wickets for 69 runs. He was for many years prominently associated with the Toronto C.C.

LIEUT. C. A. SYMONS (10th Gloucestershire Regiment) was killed in action, September 25-29, aged 22. He was a member of the cricket and football teams at King Edward's School, Bath.

2ND LIEUT. RONALD FRANCIS TAYLOR (5th Shropshire Light Infantry) was killed in Flanders on August 9, aged 27. In 1907 he was in the Malvern College Eleven, making 272 runs with an average of 19.42: he scored 18 v. Clifton and 19 v. Repton. He did not obtain his blue at Cambridge.

2ND LIEUT. T. RALPH TAYLOR (6th Battalion Lancashire Fusiliers) was killed in the Dardanelles in August, aged 28. He was a member of the Castleton C.C.

CAPT. ALEC VAUGHAN THOMAS (11th East Surrey Regiment, attached 2nd Hampshire) was killed in action in the Dardanelles on August 6, aged 22. He was in the Repton XI in 1912, when he headed the batting averages with 29.30, and subsequently played at Oxford for his College, Oriel, but did not obtain his blue. In 1913 he appeared in the Freshmen's match, but failed to score.

CAPT. GEORGE OLIVER THOMAS (2nd Battalion Royal Welsh Fusiliers), who was killed in Flanders on September 27, aged 31, was well-known in North Wales as a cricketer.

2ND LIEUT. ALAN H. THOMPSON (4th Grenadier Guards), who fell in action in France on September 27, aged 35, was in the Charterhouse XI in 1898 and 1899, being captain the latter year. He averaged 20.61 in 1898 and 31.52 in 1899, when it was said of him: Quite the best bat of the eleven: plays well in front of the wickets: has a clever leg-stroke, but he does not use his strength to the best advantage, and is weak in cutting. A good ground field and safe catch. As a captain has taken a great deal of trouble, but has been unfortunate in his eleven. His chief scores that season were 144 v. Butterflies and 105 v. Free Foresters. Since 1900 he had been a member of the M.C.C.

MR. WILLIAM WRIGHT THOMSON, for many years a member of the Surrey County C.C. Committee, died at Mitcham Park, Surrey, on January 3, aged 68. He was born in South Africa and educated at Cheltenham, but was not in the Eleven. Several well-known players, including Richardson and Strukwick, owed their introduction to first-class cricket to him. He was a well-known member of the Kennel Club, and one of the oldest exhibitors of collies.

MR. WALTER ALFRED THORNTON, brother of Messrs, R. T. and A. J. Thornton, was born in London on February 23, 1858, and died at Kidderminster on the 2nd of February. He has been described as A fast but erratic bowler, a hard hitter and a sure field. In 1874 and next two seasons he was in the Winchester Eleven, in 1876 making 31 not out and 22, in totals of 74 and 67, v. Eton: he was the highest scorer in each innings and in his first carried his bat through. In 1879 and three following years he was in the Oxford Eleven, but in his four matches v. Cambridge made only 86 runs in eight innings, and took but five wickets for 126 runs. He also played for Devonshire, and at Southampton in 1880 played an innings of 122 not out. He once hit Mr. David Buchanan for 20 runs (6, 4, 6, 4,) off a four-ball over. In strictly first-class cricket his highest score was 70 for Oxford University v. M.C.C. and Ground, at Oxford, in 1879.

2ND LIEUT. ARTHUR GEOFFREY THURLOW (8th Duke of Wellington's Regiment) died at Alexandria on August the 29th of wounds received in the Dardanelles eight days earlier, aged 23. In 1909 and two following years he was in the Felsted Eleven, heading the averages in 1910 and 1911 with 23.86 and 43.76 respectively. His highest score was 87 v. Leys School in 1911. He was an all-round athlete and played hockey several times for Cambridge University in 1912-13.

THE REV. ROBERT MOWBRAY TILLARD, who died on June 8, aged 69, played occasionally in the Rugby Eleven in 1864, but not against Marlborongh or M.C.C. and Ground. That year he scored 35 and 16 for Next XXII v. The Eleven.

LIEUT. ALEXANDER FINDLATER TODD (1st Norfolk Regiment) was killed in action at Hill 60, near Ypres on April 21. He was educated at Mill Hill School (1885-1892), where he was in the Eleven, and subsequently played occasionally for Berkshire, being a capital wicket-keeper. Playing for Beckenham v. Streatham, at Streatham, in June, 1899, he was bowled three times in two overs by H.L.Dawson, twice in an over with no-balls. He was a famous Rugby footballer, playing for Cambridge University in 1893-4-5, and later for England against Scotland and Ireland. In 1896 he was a member of the English Rugby XV in South Africa. He served through the South African War as a captain in Roberts' Horse, and was wounded. He was born on September 20, 1873.

2ND LIEUT. J. S. M. TOMBS (148th Brigade, R.F.A.) died on September 13, aged 27, of wounds received in Belgium. At Loretto he was in the Football XI and twelfth man at cricket. For many years he played for Rock Ferry, his best season being that of 1910, when he made 441 runs with an average of 23.21.

CAPT. FRANCIS WHITECHURCH TOWNEND (Royal Engineers) died on March 29 from wounds received on the previous day, in his thirtieth year. He was born in Nova Scotia and educated at Dulwich, but left too young to be in the Eleven. He was a well-known Army cricketer, having appeared for the Royal Engineers against the Royal Artillery at Lord's several times. He had also played for the Bombay Presidency, the Indian Army and the Free Foresters.

CAPT. CECIL THOMAS TUFF (Royal West Kent Regiment) was killed in action at Hill 60, near Ypres, on April 18, aged 29. He made many good scores for St. Lawrence C.C., Band of Brothers, and other Kent clubs.

2ND LIEUT. FRANK NOEL TUFF (Royal East Kent Mounted Rifles), born at Rochester on November the 26th, 1889, died at Malta on November 7, of wounds received in the Dardanelles on October 23. At Malvern, where he was in the Eleven for three years. He was the chief bowler of the side--medium-paced--in 1906, and headed the averages in each of the following seasons. At Oxford in 1909 he scored 29 not out and 36 and took three wickets in the Freshmen's match, and in the next year obtained his blue. Against Cambridge he made 10 not out and obtained one wicket for 21 runs, but against the Gentlemen of England the same year his analyses were five for 28 and two for 18. He also appeared for Kent 2nd XI, Band of Brothers, and Free Foresters, and played football for Malvern, Oxford and the Corinthians.

2ND LIEUT. ARTHUR HARRINGTON SEYMOUR TUKE (2nd Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers) was born in June 1891, and killed near Ypres on May 7, aged 23. He had been wounded on April 15, but returned to duty. At Sherborne he was in the Eleven in 1910, scoring 195 runs with an average of 14.92. He was also in the XV.

PRIVATE THOMAS LANCELOT GAWAIN TURNBULL (Honourable Artillery Company) was killed near Ypres on April 15, aged 23. A Left-handed, free-hitting batsman, he was in the Harrow Eleven in 1909 and two following years, being captain in 1911. In his first season he was given his colours on the strength of an innings of 131 v. Old Harrovians, on his first appearance for the School immediately before the Lord's match, and his selection was thoroughly justified, as in the Eton game he hit hard for 40 on a rain-ruined wicket. That year he headed the averages with 62.33, but played only three innings. In 1910 his play was disappointing, but he showed a return to form in his last season, scoring 302 runs with an average of 21.57. Altogether, in his three matches against Eton, he made 81 runs in six innings.

LIEUT. FREDERICK HARDING TURNER (10th (Scottish) Battalion King's Liverpool Regiment) born on May 29, 1888, was killed in the trenches on January 10. He was educated at Sedbergh, where he was in the Eleven in 1904 and three following years, being captain in 1906 and 1907. He was tried for Oxford University in 1909, and that season was tenth in the first-class bowling averages, taking seventeen wickets at a cost of 16 runs each. He did not obtain his blue. Later he played for the Liverpool C.C. In 1913 he obtained his Scotch Rugby International cap.

CAPT. GERALD TURNER (5th Gurkha Rifles) fell in action in the Dardanelles in June, aged 29. In 1901 and the next three years he was in the Fettes XI., being second in the averages in 1903 with 32.37, and first in 1904 with 52.84: in the last-mentioned season he scored 174 not out v. Lasswade and 121 v. Blair Lodge. In 1905 he was second in the Sandhurst averages with 46.80. He was also a good Rugby footballer, and in 1902-3 and 1903-4 was in the Fettes XV.

CORPORAL WILLIAM HUGH TWYNAM (7th Overseas Battalion Canadian Expeditionary Force) born in Hampshire on January 11, 1883, was killed in action on April 24. He was well-known in Canadian cricket circles, and in 1913 was captain of the Burrard C.C. He had served in the Boer War.

CAPT. BEVERLY USSHER (Prince of Wales' Leinster Regiment, Royal Canadians) was killed in action in the Dardanelles on June the 22nd. He had played many good innings for the Staff College, and had appeared occasionally for Buckinghamshire. In the Oxford Freshmen's match of 1899 he scored 46 and 6.

2ND LIEUT. LANCELOT ANDREWES VIDAL (3rd Battalion, attached 2nd, Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry) was killed on September 25, aged 28. He was a member of the Malvern Eleven in 1905 and 1906, in the latter year heading the averages with 40.00. In 1905, when his figure was 15.75, he played an innings of 52 v. Clifton.

PRIVATE SIDNEY FRANK VOLLER (6th Northamptonshire Regiment), born at Milford, Surrey, on December 30, 1889, was killed in Belgium on July 28. He was an all-round cricketer, excelling as a fast right-handed bowler, and was well-known in West Surrey, especially in the neighbourhood of Milford, Witley, and Godalming.

MAJOR GEORGE HENRY WALFORD (Suffolk Regiment) was killed in action in France on April 19, aged 36. He was in the Rugby Eleven of 1896, scoring 231 runs in ten innings. It was said of him: Played some good innings on critical occasions, notably against Marlborough, but was very uncertain. In the match alluded to, at Lord's, he made 71, the next highest score for either side being only 32.

CAPT. ARTHUR J. WALKER (6th Manchester Regiment) born in December, 1895, was killed in the Dardanelles in August. In 1912 and two following years he was in the Wellingborough Grammar School Eleven, his best season being 1913, when he averaged 28.00. His highest score was 73 v. Bedford Modern School in 1914. He was a good footballer and splendid boxer, and probably the youngest Captain in the British Army, having been promoted to that rank before he was 19.

CAPT. H. J. I. WALKER (1st Royal Warwickshire Regiment), who fell in action in May or June, played cricket for his Battalion. He was a splendid all-round athlete, and had been mentioned in Despatches.

2ND LIEUT. E. WALKER-COREN (R.F.A) died on June 15 of wounds received in action, aged 22. He was in the Cheltenham Eleven in 1910 and 1911, being a useful all-round performer without achieving much of note.

LIEUT. W. M. Wallace (2nd Squadron Royal Flying Corps) was killed at the end of August by the falling of his aeroplane close to the German lines, aged 22. He was in the Edinburgh Academy Eleven in 1909 and three following years, his best season being 1911, when he made 409 runs with an average of 24.06. In 1910 he played an innings of 101 v. Loretto. At Cambridge he obtained his blue for Rugby football.

MAJOR WALTER MILBANKE WALMISLEY, of the City of London Artillery Brigade (5th London Division, R.A.), died at Wallington, Surrey, on March 22, aged 83. He was a member of the family which put an eleven in the field against Bromley (Kent) in 1872 and XI of the Blundell Family in 1873.

DR. J. RILEY WATSON, who died at Harrogate on October 18, was for nearly twenty years captain of the Harrogate C.C.

CAPT. THOMAS WEATHERBY (9th Battalion Duke of Wellington's Regiment) was born in 1895 and died at the Alexandra Military Hospital, Cosham, on May 8. He was in the Winchester Eleven of 1913, when he scored 132 runs with an average of 16.50. Against Eton he scored 0 and 34.

LIEUT. GUY FITZGERALD WHARTON (2nd Battalion Durham Light Infantry) died of wounds near Ypres on May 9, aged 20. He was in the Charterhouse Eleven in 1912, but did not play against Westminster or Wellington.

MR. WILLIAM BYRON WHARTON, who was born at Manchester, died in Brooklyn (N.Y.), where he had lived for 70 years, on October 16, aged 83. He was one of the organizers of the Manhattan C.C. In 1853 he played for New York v. Philadelphia, at Camden, and was the highest scorer in the match with 20. He was a member of the New York Veterans' Cricket Association.

CAPT. GEORGE LUMLEY WHATFORD (66th Punjabis) fell in action in the Persian Gulf, November 22--24, aged 37. For several years he made heavy scores for Eastbourne, and in 1904 was tried for Sussex after playing an innings of 101 for the second XI against Kent 2nd at Brighton. He kept up the game whilst in India with his regiment, and at Peshawar especially made many good scores.

MR. FRANCIS VENABLES WILLIAMS, who died at Altrincham, Cheshire, on April 12, aged 72, was in the Harrow Eleven in 1862, when it was said of him: Was chosen in the Eleven for his wicket-keeping; wants more freedom in batting; a moderately good field. In the match with Eton, which Harrow lost by 54 runs, he scored 0 not out and 1 not out and made two catches. He was also in the Football Eleven in 1861-2.

PRIVATE J. N. WILLIAMS (New Zealand Contingent, Auckland Battalion) was killed in action on April 25, 1915. He was not in the Eleven whilst at Eton or Oxford, but was a useful hard-hitting batsman. During 1902-3, having settled in New Zealand, he played a few times for Lord Hawke's team, his best score being 48 v. XVIII of Manawatu. He kept up his cricket in the Dominion, appearing for South Auckland. He was brother of Mr. P. F. C. Williams of the Eton Elevens of 1902 and 1903. Since 1905 he had been a member of the M.C.C.

LIEUT. PHILIP CLARENCE WILLIAMS (10th Hampshire Regiment) was born at Brighton in May, 1894, and fell in action in the Dardanelles on August 10, aged 21. In 1912 and 1913 he was in the Brighton College Eleven, in the former year (when six of his eight innings were unfinished) averaging 42.50 and in the latter 17.44. He did not obtain his blue at Oxford.

2ND LIEUT. JOHN MAURICE WILLIAMSON (2nd Battalion Gordon Highlanders) was killed in France on May 16, aged 25. In 1907 and 1908 he was in the Leys School Eleven, averaging 12.93 and 12.56 in the respective seasons.

MAJOR ERNEST CHARLES WODEHOUSE, D.S.O. (1st Worcestershire Regt.) was born in 1871, and fell in action near Neuve Chapelle on March 12. He played for the Gentlemen of Worcestershire. For his services in the South African War he received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, the King's with two, and the D.S.O.

LIEUT. GEOFFREY DAYRELL WOOD (7th Suffolk Regiment) was killed in France on October 13, aged 24. He was in the Cheltenham Eleven in 1908 and two following years, being captain in 1909 and 1910. As a batsman he was useful, and in his last season headed the bowling with a record of forty-five wickets for 15.17 runs each. Whilst at Cheltenham he was also captain of the Rugby XV and the hockey team. At Oxford he played in the Freshmen's match in 1911 and in the Seniors' in 1912, in the first innings of the latter game taking six wickets for 23 runs. He had been member of the M.C.C. since 1911.

2ND LIEUT. KENNETH HERBERT CLAYTON WOODROFFE (6th Battalion Rifle Brigade, attached 2nd Welsh Regiment) was born at Lewes on December 9, 1892, and was killed in action near Neuve Chapelle on May 9. In 1909 and three following seasons he was in the Marlborough Eleven, being captain in 1912, and he played for Cambridge in 1913 and 1914, obtaining his blue as a Freshman. Mr. F. B. Wilson, writing of his in Wisden for 1912, said: He is really fast, and can make the ball turn from the off on nearly any wicket. His action is a high and easy one, and, being tall, be often makes the ball bet up very quickly. Moreover, what is most important, missed catches do not appear to worry him unduly, and he keeps on trying all the time. He headed the Marlborough bowling in 1910 and 1911, and in 1912 was second to R. D. Busk. In his three matches v. Rugby--he did not play in the 1910 game, which Rugby won easily--he took twenty-one wickets for 14.95 runs each, and on his two appearances in the University match obtained seven for 14.85 apiece. In 1912 he appeared for Hampshire against the South Africans, and two years later assisted Sussex in a couple of games and in the match with Surrey at the Oval almost pulled off the match by taking six wickets for 43 runs. He had been mentioned in Despatches.

2ND LIEUT. SIDNEY CLAYTON WOODROFFE (8th Rifle Brigade) was killed at Hooge on July 30, while showing such bravery that he was awarded the V.C. He was a brother of K. H. C. Woodroffe, and played cricket at Marlborough, but was not in the Eleven. He was 19 years of age.

CAPT. HAROLD WRIGHT (6th Loyal North Lancashire Regiment) died in London on September 13 of wounds received in the Dardanelles on July 28, aged 31. He was in the Mill Hill School Eleven in 1899 and two following years, being captain in 1901, when he had a bating average of 23.30, among his scores that season being 61 v. Wellingborough Grammar School, 51 v. Royal Naval School, and 47 v. Bedford Modern. He was an excellent club cricketer, and captain of the Leicester Ivanhoe C.C. In 1914 he appeared in six matches for Leicestershire, scoring 111 runs with an average of 13.87. His highest innings was 29 v. Hampshire at Leicester, and in the match between the same sides earlier in the year, at Southampton--his second game for the county--he had carried his bat through the innings for 26. Since 1913 he had been member of the M.C.C.

MAJOR ARTHUR WEBSTER YOUNG (10th Sherwood Foresters) was killed in Flanders on September 13, aged 47. He was not in the Eleven whilst at Harrow, but played subsequently for the Derbyshire Friars. He was well-known in the hunting-field.


Particulars of the following deaths were not received in time for inclusion in WISDEN'S ALMANACK FOR 1915:--

MAJOR EUSTACE CRAWLEY (12th Lancers), born on April 19, 1868, fell in action on November 2, 1914, aged 46. He was educated at Harrow and, like his father and uncle and two brothers, obtained his colours. He was in the Eleven in 1885 and 1886. averaging 24.71 in the first year and 22.00 in the second. His best performances were in the matches with Eton, his scores being 100 and 7 in 1885 and 40 and 69 in 1886. In the latter year, when he headed the averages, it was said of him:-- The best bat in the Eleven on all grounds; at Lord's he played two perfect innings; scores fast when set; players straight, watches the ball, and seldom lets off a loose one; is a splendid field and can bowl a bit. At Cambridge he gained his blue as a Freshman in 1887, and by making 35 and 103 not out in the University match fulfilled the promise of his school-days. Against Oxford he failed in 1888, being dismissed for 0 and 1, but in 1889 he scored 54, the second highest innings in the game for either side. No other batsman has ever made a hundred in the Eton and Harrow match and also in the University match. Since 1887 he had been a member of the M.C.C., and he had played with success for Hertfordshire. He also gained high honours at rackets and tennis, and was a skilful and plucky horseman.

CAPT. ROLAND SACKVILLE FLETCHER (1st Northumberland Fusiliers) fell in action in Flanders on November 2, 1914, aged 32. He did not obtain a place in the Eleven at Charterhouse, but proved himself a good batsman for his regimental team. He was the author of Hausa Sayings and Folklore.

LIEUT. HERBERT JAMES GRAHAM GILMOUR (Worcestershire Regt.), born in August, 1883, fell in action on September 28, 1914. He played for the Gentlemen of Worcestershire.

MR. SYDNEY SLEATH GREEN, who died at Brighton on December 31, 1914, was in the Eton Eleven of 1886, when it was said of him: A fair bat: keeps wicket when needed; slow in the field. Against Winchester he scored 0, v. Harrow 1 and 7 not out, and v. M.C.C. and Ground 12 and 9. His average for the season was 13.66.

THE REV. G. L. INGLES (Chaplain with Canadian Contingent), who died on Salisbury Plain on December 31, 1914, was a useful medium-paced bowler and a good batsman. He was a member of the first Toronto Zingari team which visited Philadelphia, and also was in Dr. W. E. Dean's Toronto side which went to New York in 1912.

LIEUT.-COL. GEORGE HENRY FITZMAURICE KELLY (34th Sikh Pioneers) was born at Meerut on May 29, 1869, and killed near Bethune on November 24, 1914. He was educated at St. Charles College, London, where he was in the Eleven. In 1889 he was in the Sandhurst team, and in the match v. Woolwich, which Sandhurst lost by 149 runs, scored 9 and 3, took four wickets and made two catches.

THE HON. JOHN NESBITT KIRCHHOFFER, born in County Cork on May 5, 1848, died at Toronto on December 22, 1914. In 1880 he played for Canada against the United States at Nicetown. He was not in the Eleven whilst at Marlborough.

CAPT. ROWLAND HARRY MAINWARING MOODY (2nd Lancashire Fusiliers) fell in the Battle of Cambrai on August 26, 1914, aged 39. He was not in the Eleven whilst at Charterhouse, but joined the M.C.C. in 1906 and played frequently for the club. He served in the South African War.

LIEUT. A. NORTHEY (Worcestershire Regt.), who fell in action on October 14, 1914, played occasionally for the Gentlemen of Worcestershire.

CAPT. ROBERT HAROLD OLIVER (Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry), who was killed in action on September 23, 1914, aged 35, played occasionally for Wiltshire.

LIEUT. BRIAN OSBORNE (15th Hussars) was killed near Herentage Chateau, Ypres, on November 11, 1914. He was in the Harrow Eleven in 1906, when he made 177 runs with an average of 19.66. Against Eton he did little, however, scoring only 0 and 6. He had been a member of the M.C.C. since 1908.

CAPT. R. W. PEPYS (Worcestershire Regt.), who fell in action on October 10, 1914, appeared at times for the Gentlemen of Worcestershire.

2ND LIEUT. FRANCIS PEPYS (2nd Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry) was killed in action near Ypres on November 12, 1914, aged 23. He was in the Charterhouse Eleven of 1909, when he was third in the batting averages with 22.33. His highest score was 33 not out in the second innings of the match with West minster. He had been a member of the M.C.C. since 1910.

2ND LIEUT. RICHARD DOUGLAS PRYCE-JENKIN (South Wales Borderers), born at Raglan, Monmouthshire, on July 29, 1894, fell in action in December, 1914. In 1913 he was in the Blundell's School XI, when he made 329 runs with an average of 25.31, his highest score being 105.

MR. HUGH EDWARD RAYNHIRD,, born at Hengrave Suffolk, in July, 1825, died at Hackwood (where he had lived for 60 years), near Basingstoke, on May 11, 1914. He was a very great lover indeed of the game, and in 1856 was the chief founder of the well-known Hackwood Park C.C., of which he was for 30 years one of the best players and the Treasurer to the day of his death. In 1863 Parr's All England Eleven played XXII of the Club. All his family were cricket enthusiasts, and he and his sons and daughters were able to form an eleven in the field: these, with family connections, often played together under the name of The Grasshoppers. Mr. Raynbird, who was a well-known agriculturist and auctioneer, was editor of the quarterly journal Hampshire Records, Past and Present.

ARNOLD RYLOTT, born at Grantham of February 18, 1840, died of Pneumonia at Sandy, in Bedfordshire, on April 17, 1914, aged 74, Scores and Biographies said of him:-- Is a right-handed batsman, but a fast left round-armed bowler; fields in no particular place, and has on various occasions distinguished himself in matches of note. He was rather late in coming to the fore, being 30 when he played his first match at Lord's. In 1872 he was engaged at Lord's, subsequently becoming head of the ground-staff. In 1875 he became qualified for Leicestershire, and for that county he appeared for many years. For M.C.C. & Ground v. Nottinghamshire, at Nottingham, in 1883, he and Woof at one period of the game bowled 60 balls without a run, and took five wickets for a single in 65 balls.

Twice he took all ten wickets in an innings for M.C.C. & Ground v. Richmond, at Old Deer Park (for 38 runs), in July, 1881, and v. Bath College, at Bath, in July, 1891.

Rylott received two benefit matches-- Leicestershire, v. M.C.C. & Ground, at Leicester, in 1889, and North v. South at Lord's, in 1891. He was the author of a book of verse entitled: Our Bobby Rylott when a Boy.

LIEUT. JOHN DENIS SHINE (Royal Irish Regiment), who died of wounds at Mons, on August 25, 1914, was educated at Downside School, where he was a prominent member of the cricket, hockey, and football teams.

CAPT. ALGERNON BERESFORD SMYTH (2nd King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry) fell in action on November 15, 1914, aged 30. He played for the Aldershot Command, and was a member of the Yorkshire Gentlemen's C.C. and the Free Foresters.

MR. R. VINCENT, who died at Christchurch (N.Z.) in September, 1914, aged 38, was for four years Hon. Treasure of the New Zealand Cricket Council.

2ND LIEUT. GEOFFEREY CHAUNER WAINWRIGHT (Northamptonshire Regiment) died of wounds on December the 22nd, 1914. He was in the Wellington Eleven in 1911, 1912, and 1913, being second in the averages in 1911 with 19.30, and third in 1913 with 28.33.

CAPT. SIR FRANCIS ERNEST WALLER, 4th Baronet (Royal Fusiliers), born on June 11, 1880, was killed near Neuve Chapelle on October 25, 1914. He was a well-known member of the Warwickshire County C.C., and was High Sheriff for Warwickshire in 1913. He served in the South African War 1899-1902.


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