Ball-tampering

Players are barred, by Law 42.3, from rubbing the ball on the ground, interfering with its seam or surface, or using any implement that can alter the condition of the ball to thereby gain unfair advantage. There have been plenty of ugly incidents centring on accusations of ball-tampering through cricket's history: the John Lever "Vaseline" affair in 1976-77; the times England and New Zealand accused Pakistan of it in the early 1990s; Michael Atherton's admission that he used dirt to treat the ball against South Africa in 1994; and perhaps most infamously, the Oval Test of 2006 when Pakistan forfeited the match because they were accused of having tampered with the ball.


What a horrible mess
What a horrible mess

Of all the Pakistan series to have taken place in England since the start of the 1980s, this had been by a country mile the most harmonious. All that has changed with Darrell Hair's one decision

Pakistan forfeit Test amid farcical scenes
Pakistan forfeit Test amid farcical scenes

The fourth Test between England and Pakistan at The Oval has been forfeited as an England win, after a joint statement between the ICC, ECB and PCB

Troubled times ahead
Troubled times ahead

While the debate rages about the rights and wrongs of actions on the fourth day at The Oval, the attention will soon turn to the future and what will happen to the various parties in the days ahead. Here is Cricinfo's take on what to expect.

Scrambling the seam
Scrambling the seam

Tampering with a cricket ball isn't a new phenomenon but it was only in late 2000 that the ICC decided to impose a five-run penalty if any side was found guilty of affecting the condition of the ball. Here we track the recent instances

A matter of honour, says Inzamam
A matter of honour, says Inzamam

Inzamam-ul-Haq has confirmed that the Pakistani stance on their forfeited Test at The Oval is a matter of honour, after the match ball was changed by umpire Darrell Hair midway through the afternoon session