Nigeria April 17, 2007

Gambia to host Championships

The Gambia will host the North-West African Cricket Championship between May 11 to May 18

The Gambia will host the North-West African Cricket Championship between May 11 to May 18. Six countries - Mali, Morocco, Sierra-Leone, Nigeria, Ghana and the Gambia - are expected to take part in the championship which will be the first of its kind on the continent.

Martin Williamson is executive editor of ESPNcricinfo and managing editor of ESPN Digital Media in Europe, the Middle East and Africa

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • Richie on April 28, 2007, 8:50 GMT

    Bravo crciket le afrique. C'est decision magnifique.

  • Steven Davies-Morris on April 22, 2007, 20:04 GMT

    It's a long road for any nation to get to ODIs. If one goes and reads the ICC progress path for nations beyond the 6 that made it to the recent WC it becomes apparent that they have to jump through hoops (with only token financial assistance) to get within sniffing range of the ICC qualifying tournament. If we really want to get all puffy about minnow nations playing the big guys, it was what? 25 years after it played its first test in 1930 before NZ won a test match. And another 15 years or so before it won its first test series. So I think the aspiring small fry of today should be cut some slack.

    For comparison look at Sri Lanka. How far have they come in 15 years? Going into the 1993 World Cup they were still regarded as a minnow, even though they'd been playing tests for a few years. 30 years ago they were playing at the standard shown by Bermuda in CWC2007. The other minnow teams that played in CWC2007 are *much* better than SL were in the 76 and 79 World Cups. And on par with the 83 and 89 SL teams IMO. They're better than Zimbabwe was too, but since the Zims have backslid because of the terrible internal political situation (not the fault of their players or coaches) comparing to them is a bit pointless.

    Anyway, good luck with this tournament. Small beginnings, but one day some of these nations will get there. Other African nations like Uganda and Tanzania are knocking on the door. I'll have to check the dates but I'm pretty sure that in the general time frame of this tournament in Gambia, the ICC WCL Division 3 feeder tournament will be played in Darwin (Oz).

    [checks schedule]

    Here it is: Division 3 will be staged in Darwin from May 27 to June 2 with the top two teams progressing to WCL Division 2, a 6-team round-robin event to be staged in Namibia from 23 November - 1 December 2007 (feeding to the ICC WC qualifying tournament in 2008).

    Group A. Papua New Guinea (1), Fiji (3), Italy (6) and Argentina (8)

    Group B. Uganda (2), Hong Kong (4), Cayman Islands (5) and Tanzania (7).

    If Uganda and Tanzania weren't going to Oz, they'd no doubt be playing (and be the favourites) to win the Gambia tournament. But even they have a long road to travel to even deserve to go up against Ireland, Scotland, Holland, Kenya, Canada, etc. So don't expect to see any of these other very new boys at the WC any time soon. ;-)

  • Rich B on April 21, 2007, 18:04 GMT

    What tosh! As cricket takes so long to develop in emerging nations that's all the more reason to get started now.

    If the ICC were purely wanting to make money, they wouldn't bother investing in North Africa anyway. This tournament is about allowing cricketers from African nations to play each other, no more, no less. No one's going to be suggesting an ODI series with Australia for the winners.

  • Khurram Habib on April 19, 2007, 16:10 GMT

    Good for cricket. I just came across this comment. Perhaps, for the good of the game, I might have to differ. Trust me, nothing thrills one when average teams begin playing a sport and then, give tons of runs away to opponents. We've seen so 200-plus run margins of victory in the World Cup in West Indies already. So, why bring the level of cricket down and give false hopes.

    Unfortunately, cricket, unlike soccer takes a while to permeate into the society. You need infrastructure and equipment to become a good quality team and it can take years.

    North-west Africa doesn't need cricket. It has great footballing talent. Lust for making money should avoided and I am sorry to say that the governors of the game are not paying attention to the quality of the game. We have Zimbabwe, Kenya, Holland and some others with ODI status. And they are struggling. You need to strengthen cricket in these nations first and then think about spreading it. World Cup soccer is much better-fought than cricket world cup. We need to check this.

    Look at Bangladesh. It's six years since they got Test status and they haven't yet won a one-dayer each against all Test playing nations leave alone Tests. They haven't beaten England, neither New Zealand.

  • Udayan Sanyal on April 18, 2007, 15:17 GMT

    This is good for African cricket.

  • Richie on April 28, 2007, 8:50 GMT

    Bravo crciket le afrique. C'est decision magnifique.

  • Steven Davies-Morris on April 22, 2007, 20:04 GMT

    It's a long road for any nation to get to ODIs. If one goes and reads the ICC progress path for nations beyond the 6 that made it to the recent WC it becomes apparent that they have to jump through hoops (with only token financial assistance) to get within sniffing range of the ICC qualifying tournament. If we really want to get all puffy about minnow nations playing the big guys, it was what? 25 years after it played its first test in 1930 before NZ won a test match. And another 15 years or so before it won its first test series. So I think the aspiring small fry of today should be cut some slack.

    For comparison look at Sri Lanka. How far have they come in 15 years? Going into the 1993 World Cup they were still regarded as a minnow, even though they'd been playing tests for a few years. 30 years ago they were playing at the standard shown by Bermuda in CWC2007. The other minnow teams that played in CWC2007 are *much* better than SL were in the 76 and 79 World Cups. And on par with the 83 and 89 SL teams IMO. They're better than Zimbabwe was too, but since the Zims have backslid because of the terrible internal political situation (not the fault of their players or coaches) comparing to them is a bit pointless.

    Anyway, good luck with this tournament. Small beginnings, but one day some of these nations will get there. Other African nations like Uganda and Tanzania are knocking on the door. I'll have to check the dates but I'm pretty sure that in the general time frame of this tournament in Gambia, the ICC WCL Division 3 feeder tournament will be played in Darwin (Oz).

    [checks schedule]

    Here it is: Division 3 will be staged in Darwin from May 27 to June 2 with the top two teams progressing to WCL Division 2, a 6-team round-robin event to be staged in Namibia from 23 November - 1 December 2007 (feeding to the ICC WC qualifying tournament in 2008).

    Group A. Papua New Guinea (1), Fiji (3), Italy (6) and Argentina (8)

    Group B. Uganda (2), Hong Kong (4), Cayman Islands (5) and Tanzania (7).

    If Uganda and Tanzania weren't going to Oz, they'd no doubt be playing (and be the favourites) to win the Gambia tournament. But even they have a long road to travel to even deserve to go up against Ireland, Scotland, Holland, Kenya, Canada, etc. So don't expect to see any of these other very new boys at the WC any time soon. ;-)

  • Rich B on April 21, 2007, 18:04 GMT

    What tosh! As cricket takes so long to develop in emerging nations that's all the more reason to get started now.

    If the ICC were purely wanting to make money, they wouldn't bother investing in North Africa anyway. This tournament is about allowing cricketers from African nations to play each other, no more, no less. No one's going to be suggesting an ODI series with Australia for the winners.

  • Khurram Habib on April 19, 2007, 16:10 GMT

    Good for cricket. I just came across this comment. Perhaps, for the good of the game, I might have to differ. Trust me, nothing thrills one when average teams begin playing a sport and then, give tons of runs away to opponents. We've seen so 200-plus run margins of victory in the World Cup in West Indies already. So, why bring the level of cricket down and give false hopes.

    Unfortunately, cricket, unlike soccer takes a while to permeate into the society. You need infrastructure and equipment to become a good quality team and it can take years.

    North-west Africa doesn't need cricket. It has great footballing talent. Lust for making money should avoided and I am sorry to say that the governors of the game are not paying attention to the quality of the game. We have Zimbabwe, Kenya, Holland and some others with ODI status. And they are struggling. You need to strengthen cricket in these nations first and then think about spreading it. World Cup soccer is much better-fought than cricket world cup. We need to check this.

    Look at Bangladesh. It's six years since they got Test status and they haven't yet won a one-dayer each against all Test playing nations leave alone Tests. They haven't beaten England, neither New Zealand.

  • Udayan Sanyal on April 18, 2007, 15:17 GMT

    This is good for African cricket.

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  • Udayan Sanyal on April 18, 2007, 15:17 GMT

    This is good for African cricket.

  • Khurram Habib on April 19, 2007, 16:10 GMT

    Good for cricket. I just came across this comment. Perhaps, for the good of the game, I might have to differ. Trust me, nothing thrills one when average teams begin playing a sport and then, give tons of runs away to opponents. We've seen so 200-plus run margins of victory in the World Cup in West Indies already. So, why bring the level of cricket down and give false hopes.

    Unfortunately, cricket, unlike soccer takes a while to permeate into the society. You need infrastructure and equipment to become a good quality team and it can take years.

    North-west Africa doesn't need cricket. It has great footballing talent. Lust for making money should avoided and I am sorry to say that the governors of the game are not paying attention to the quality of the game. We have Zimbabwe, Kenya, Holland and some others with ODI status. And they are struggling. You need to strengthen cricket in these nations first and then think about spreading it. World Cup soccer is much better-fought than cricket world cup. We need to check this.

    Look at Bangladesh. It's six years since they got Test status and they haven't yet won a one-dayer each against all Test playing nations leave alone Tests. They haven't beaten England, neither New Zealand.

  • Rich B on April 21, 2007, 18:04 GMT

    What tosh! As cricket takes so long to develop in emerging nations that's all the more reason to get started now.

    If the ICC were purely wanting to make money, they wouldn't bother investing in North Africa anyway. This tournament is about allowing cricketers from African nations to play each other, no more, no less. No one's going to be suggesting an ODI series with Australia for the winners.

  • Steven Davies-Morris on April 22, 2007, 20:04 GMT

    It's a long road for any nation to get to ODIs. If one goes and reads the ICC progress path for nations beyond the 6 that made it to the recent WC it becomes apparent that they have to jump through hoops (with only token financial assistance) to get within sniffing range of the ICC qualifying tournament. If we really want to get all puffy about minnow nations playing the big guys, it was what? 25 years after it played its first test in 1930 before NZ won a test match. And another 15 years or so before it won its first test series. So I think the aspiring small fry of today should be cut some slack.

    For comparison look at Sri Lanka. How far have they come in 15 years? Going into the 1993 World Cup they were still regarded as a minnow, even though they'd been playing tests for a few years. 30 years ago they were playing at the standard shown by Bermuda in CWC2007. The other minnow teams that played in CWC2007 are *much* better than SL were in the 76 and 79 World Cups. And on par with the 83 and 89 SL teams IMO. They're better than Zimbabwe was too, but since the Zims have backslid because of the terrible internal political situation (not the fault of their players or coaches) comparing to them is a bit pointless.

    Anyway, good luck with this tournament. Small beginnings, but one day some of these nations will get there. Other African nations like Uganda and Tanzania are knocking on the door. I'll have to check the dates but I'm pretty sure that in the general time frame of this tournament in Gambia, the ICC WCL Division 3 feeder tournament will be played in Darwin (Oz).

    [checks schedule]

    Here it is: Division 3 will be staged in Darwin from May 27 to June 2 with the top two teams progressing to WCL Division 2, a 6-team round-robin event to be staged in Namibia from 23 November - 1 December 2007 (feeding to the ICC WC qualifying tournament in 2008).

    Group A. Papua New Guinea (1), Fiji (3), Italy (6) and Argentina (8)

    Group B. Uganda (2), Hong Kong (4), Cayman Islands (5) and Tanzania (7).

    If Uganda and Tanzania weren't going to Oz, they'd no doubt be playing (and be the favourites) to win the Gambia tournament. But even they have a long road to travel to even deserve to go up against Ireland, Scotland, Holland, Kenya, Canada, etc. So don't expect to see any of these other very new boys at the WC any time soon. ;-)

  • Richie on April 28, 2007, 8:50 GMT

    Bravo crciket le afrique. C'est decision magnifique.