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ICC moots internet in dressing rooms

Amol Karhadkar

June 27, 2013

Comments: 9 | Text size: A | A

Thilan Thushara gets a warm reception at the Sri Lankan dressing room, Sri Lanka v India, 5th ODI, Colombo, August 29, 2008
The ACSU has been against the use of internet in dressing rooms during international matches © ESPNcricinfo Ltd
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Nearly two months before the start of the sixth IPL season, the BCCI and Cricket South Africa had supported a Cricket Australia (CA) proposal, during an ICC board meeting in Dubai, for introducing internet access in dressing rooms during international matches. The proposal was opposed by YP Singh, the head of ICC's Anti-Corruption and Security Unit (ACSU).

The ACSU has consistently opposed access to internet in the players' and officials' area since it poses a danger of information being disseminated to the outside world.

According to the minutes of the ICC board meeting held on January 29 this year - which were accessed by ESPNcricinfo on Thursday - BCCI president N Srinivasan had supported Cricket Australia's proposal, which had been struck down once earlier, because "live performance data could be transferred into the PMOA (Players and Match Officials Area) for live use by analysts". However, Srinivasan wasn't the only one to support this cause.

"Despite concerns raised by Mr Singh as to the ability of the ACSU to monitor the kind of system being proposed, Mr Srinivasan and Mr Faul [then acting CEO of CSA] expressed support for CA's proposal," the minutes read.

The discussion concluded with the board being of the view that "alternate technology must be available to provide a solution to the concerns of the ACSU". As a result, CA and the England and Wales Cricket Board were asked to carry out further work with the ACSU on a "trial" basis and revert to the board with a progress report "at an appropriate time".

Singh, who was a special invitee for the meeting, had reiterated the ACSU's stand of not making internet access available to players, support staff and match officials.

During the third Test of India's tour of Sri Lanka in 2010 at the P Sara Oval, an ACSU officer had forced the Sri Lankan media manager to introduce a password for the wi-fi connection in the press box. Since the media box was very close to the dressing room, the analysts and match officials could access internet meant for the press. The moment ACSU realised it, it was brought to the match referee's attention and a password was introduced for wi-fi access in the press box.

The minutes also mention Singh having raised an alarm over ownership patterns of a few franchises, without specifying the domestic Twenty20 leagues. "Mr (Giles) Clarke reported that Mr Singh had explained in a meeting the previous day that his biggest concern was in respect of the identity of the owners of certain domestic franchises, and the lack of transparent process around how those franchises had been awarded and how they could financially be sustained."

Amol Karhadkar is a correspondent at ESPNcricinfo

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© ESPN Sports Media Ltd.

Posted by SarfBD on (June 28, 2013, 11:07 GMT)

Well, I'm not sure how internet connection in the dressing room can contribute positively in the game. I remember in 1999 WC Hansi Cronje used headphone to communicate with the coach, and ICC didn't allow that. I think that sort of things might help teams strategically. Now, at a time when fans are losing faith and corruption in the game has become menacing, allowing internet in the dressing room can complicate things. Apart from team members and match officials no one is allowed to enter the dressing room. But internet connection can virtually give access to the restricted area. How they are going to prevent that?

Posted by   on (June 28, 2013, 10:03 GMT)

Please anyone can explain me why they are going to introduce internet for dressing rooms?

Posted by dwblurb on (June 28, 2013, 8:05 GMT)

@spindizzy, mobile phones, tablets, etc are not allowed in dressing rooms. That is basically the whole point of the article.

Posted by oj..cricfan on (June 28, 2013, 7:53 GMT)

@Arun Kumar C: The picture still doesn't relate to the article, the picture is of a ODI and not test.

Posted by   on (June 28, 2013, 7:31 GMT)

@Stup1d: I think you did not read full article. "During the third Test of India's tour of Sri Lanka in 2010 at the P Sara Oval, an ACSU officer had forced the Sri Lankan media manager to introduce a password for the wi-fi connection in the press box. Since the media box was very close to the dressing room, the analysts and match officials could access internet meant for the press. The moment ACSU realised it, it was brought to the match referee's attention and a password was introduced for wi-fi access in the press box.

"

Posted by spindizzy on (June 28, 2013, 7:09 GMT)

Surely telecoms networks and wireless access make this decision obsolete about 5 years ago anyway? Any smartphone/tablet/laptop with 3G/4G modem has full internet access anyway. This is just a strange piece of officiating after the horse has bolted. Not exactly demonstrating their relevance, are they?

Posted by I-Like-Cricket on (June 28, 2013, 5:51 GMT)

Why not? If both teams can use it, any information coming in would be helpful to both sides. This would then mean teams would have to focus on having brilliant people to look at the stats and learn from them as the game goes. It would also allow the players to be on social networking sites, interacting with all the fans which can only be good for the game.

Posted by WalkingWicket11 on (June 28, 2013, 3:26 GMT)

What is the connection between the article and that picture?

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